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Archive for the ‘drug charges’ Category

When Do Drug Charges Become a Federal Offense?

August 3rd, 2018 at 3:50 pm

drug charges, federal drug charge, federal offense, Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorneys, state drug chargeBoth federal and state laws and regulations govern the use, possession, distributing, and manufacturing of drugs. Illinois has a set of drug laws, but so does the federal government. There is a big difference between being charged with a state drug charge and a federal drug charge. Therefore, it is important to know when a drug charge could become a federal charge. Each case is unique and has its own circumstances and issues, but there are different factors at play that could elevate a state drug charge to a federal one.

Factors to Consider

The following describes a number of factors to consider that may affect a drug charge:

  • The arresting officer – One of the biggest clues involves who is making the arrest. Being arrested by a federal agent is a huge sign that you will be charged with a federal crime. Sometimes local law enforcement, or state police, will ask federal agents to aid in their case. Often, state and federal officers will work together to conduct a sting to catch criminals.
  • Where the crime occurred – Crimes that occur on federal land could result in a federal drug charge. One such example is a crime occurring in a national park.
  • Statements offered by informants – In some drug cases, there is someone who is already being investigated by the federal government. These individuals often become informants for the government and will trade names and information about crimes of others for a reduced sentence or immunity. An informant working on behalf of the federal government will likely result in a federal drug charge.
  • Severity of the drug charge or offense – States often prosecute the smaller drug crimes, while the federal government prosecutes drug crimes that happen on a larger scale.

Why This Matters

One of the biggest differences between federal and state drug crimes are the penalties associated with them. Federal charges that result in a conviction carry longer sentences than state crimes. There are longer federal mandatory sentencing guidelines than the sentencing guidelines at the state level. Additionally, federal drug crimes do not have a parole program and probation is rarely granted.

If there is any doubt as to what type of drug charge is at issue, state and local authorities will discuss the issue and come to a determination as to who is better suited to prosecute the case.

We Can Help You Today

If you have been charged with a drug crime, either state or federal, you need a dedicated and knowledgeable attorney. The skilled Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorneys at The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley are here to help you. Don’t hesitate to reach out to us today for assistance.

Source:

https://www.ussc.gov/research/research-reports/mandatory-minimum-penalties-drug-offenses-federal-system

What is Possession of a Controlled Substance in Illinois?

May 30th, 2018 at 5:10 pm

controlled substance, drug crimes, drug possession, possession of a controlled substance, Rolling Meadows defense attorneysPossession of a controlled substance is a serious drug crime in Illinois. The punishment for such a crime depends on the controlled substance in question and the amount of the substance that is found. Generally, the more of a substance a defendant has, the harsher the punishment can potentially be.

Most possession of a controlled substance crimes carry fines, probation, and jail or prison time. Ultimately, if you have been charged with this crime, it is imperative that you reach out to a skilled attorney for help immediately.

Controlled Substance

The first step in understanding possession of a controlled substance is being able to identify a controlled substance. Per 720 ILCS 570/102(f), a controlled substance is defined as a “drug, substance, immediate precursor, or synthetic drug.” The drugs included in this definition include heroin, cocaine, marijuana, methamphetamines, LSD, oxycodone, ketamine, ecstasy, and other controlled substances listed in Article II of 720 ILCS 570.

The controlled substances are broken into five different schedules. Schedule I drugs are those that are most likely to be abused. These include opiates, derivatives of opiates, and substances that are likely to induce hallucinations. Schedule V includes the least dangerous drugs. Contrary to Schedule I drugs, Schedule V drugs are those least likely to be abused.

Possession

The next step in understanding possession of a controlled substance is knowing what possession means. According to the Illinois Controlled Substances Act, it is unlawful for “any person to knowingly possess a controlled or counterfeit substance or controlled substance analog.” In general, to knowingly possess something requires that an individual must have knowledge of the controlled substance.

Circumstantial evidence can be enough to find that an individual knowingly possessed a controlled substance. For example, if a controlled substance is in a vehicle owned by the defendant, it is likely that he or she will be found to have knowingly possessed the controlled substance.

That being said, simply having a controlled substance in your possession is not enough to be convicted of a crime. In reality, you may not have been aware of the substance if it appeared in your car or your home; instead, it may have belonged to another party. Overall, if you are facing charges of drug possession, an experienced attorney can help mount an aggressive defense and ensure your rights are protected throughout each step of your case.

Contact an Attorney for Professional Help with Your Case

If you have been charged with possession of a controlled substance, you need an attorney with all of the tools to best represent you. At the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley, we combine years of experience with a passion for advocating for your rights. Our talented Rolling Meadows defense attorneys possess the requisite knowledge and skill to properly defend you. Contact us today to give you the best possible defense available to you.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs5.asp?ActID=1941&ChapterID=53

Drugged Driving in Illinois

February 5th, 2018 at 8:40 am

Class 4 felony, drugged driving, DUI charges, Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney, drug convictionMuch focus is on drunk driving. Even though motorists know they should not drive after drinking, many do anyway. This often leads to serious accidents.

Now that recreational marijuana use is legal in many states—including Illinois—it is important for motorists to understand that drugged driving is against the law as well. If a person is pulled over for driving recklessly and is found to have drugs in his or her system, he or she could face DUI charges, regardless of whether or not he or she is at the legal limit.

However, measuring the amount of drugs in one’s blood is easier said than done. There is no 0.08 percent blood alcohol content (BAC) equivalent for marijuana and other drugs. Plus, unlike alcohol, drugs can stay in a person’s body for weeks after use.

Illinois does have laws in place regarding drugged driving. Therefore, if you do use marijuana—whether for recreational or medicinal purposes—and drive later, you could face DUI charges. 

What is Considered Drugged Driving?

Illinois law allows five nanograms of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) per milliliter of blood or 10 nanograms or more per milliliter of urine or other bodily substance. However, it is also illegal for a person to drive in an unsafe manner and have even the smallest amount of drugs in his or her system. A police officer may perform a blood, breath or urine test, or require the driver to submit to field sobriety testing.

Drugged Driving Penalties

A first offense can result in a $2,500 fine, one year in prison and license suspension for one year. If a person is convicted of a second offense, the penalties increase. They include license suspension for five years, a $2,500 fine, one year of imprisonment, 30 days of community service and completion of a substance treatment program.

Once a person is convicted of three or more DUI charges, the charges become Class 4 felonies. A person will lose his or her driving privileges for six years and be subject to penalties such as drug treatment, a $10,000 fine, and three years in prison.

The penalties are enhanced when the driver is in a school zone or has a passenger under the age of 16 in the car at the time. Enhanced penalties also apply if the driver is under the influence of drugs and causes an accident that results in serious injury, disfigurement, disability, or death.

Contact Us Today for Help

It is illegal to drive while intoxicated, and that means being under the influence of not only alcohol, but drugs as well. Even marijuana use can impair one’s judgment and lead to accidents.

If you are facing DUI charges for having high levels of marijuana or other drugs in your system, you need legal help right away. The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley can defend your case. Passionate Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney Christopher Cosley can work to reduce your penalties. Let us help you today.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=062500050K11-501.2

FAQs About Medical Marijuana in Illinois

December 7th, 2017 at 8:22 am

medical marijuana, Rolling Meadows drug charges attorney, medical marijuana program, drug charges, Illinois drug lawsAccording to the ACLU, approximately 52 percent of all drug arrests conducted in the United States in 2010 were for marijuana-related crimes. This is largely thanks to the various drug laws that were passed during the government’s “war on drugs” campaign in the 70s—many of which imposed relatively harsh penalties for possessing or distributing marijuana.

However, in more recent years, several states, including Illinois, have relaxed their drug laws a bit and now permit the use of marijuana for medical purposes. Unfortunately many of these modern medical marijuana laws are not well understood by the public. Consider the following frequently asked questions to help clear some confusion. 

Q: What is “medical marijuana”?

A: The National Institute on Drug Abuse’s website notes that the term “medical marijuana” (sometimes called “medical cannabis”) refers to using the whole marijuana plant, or its extracts, to treat symptoms of illness. In other words, medical marijuana is, from a scientific standpoint, essentially the same as recreational marijuana.

Q: Who can legally obtain medical marijuana in Illinois?

A: In 2013, Illinois lawmakers passed the Compassionate Use of Medical Cannabis Pilot Program Act which was a temporary test program designed, at its core, to allow Illinois residents with qualifying debilitating medical conditions to use medical marijuana as part of their treatment plans.

Under this act qualifying “debilitating medical conditions” include Parkinson’s disease, glaucoma, muscular dystrophy, rheumatoid arthritis, as well as a number of other conditions. This pilot program was originally intended to run until the end of 2017 but last year lawmakers passed Senate Bill 10 which effectively extended the program until July 2020.

However, it should be noted that if you were convicted of a felony drug crime in the past then you are not eligible to participate in Illinois’ pilot medical marijuana program.

Q: How much medical marijuana can a qualifying patient possess under Illinois law?

A: Under Illinois’ Compassionate Use of Medical Cannabis Pilot Program Act, a qualifying patient who has properly registered and who possesses a registry identification card may not possess more than two and one-half ounces of usable marijuana.

Q: If I have a valid medical marijuana card can I legally grow marijuana at home for my own consumption?

A: No, under Illinois’ current medical marijuana laws individual cultivation is not allowed.

Need Legal Advice? Contact a Local Drug Charges Attorney

At The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley we defend clients against various felony and misdemeanor drug charges across Illinois. Thanks to Attorney Christopher Cosley, a former prosecutor in the Felony and Drug Division, our firm is well acquainted with the legal tactics commonly used by prosecuting attorneys in drug cases and we use this valuable insight to benefit our clients. To find out what an experienced Rolling Meadows drug charges attorney can do for you, contact our office today.

Source:

https://www.aclu.org/gallery/marijuana-arrests-numbers

https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugfacts/marijuana-medicine

Drug Trafficking at the State and Federal Level

November 24th, 2017 at 3:47 pm

drug trafficking, illegally trafficking drugs, trafficking heroin, Class X felony, Rolling Meadows drug crime lawyerDrug trafficking (i.e. distributing or selling a controlled substance) is illegal under both state and federal law and while the legal ramifications of federal drug convictions tend to be considered much steeper than state level drug convictions, it is important to note that this is not always the case.

If you or a loved one has been accused of illegally trafficking drugs at either the state or federal level, it is important to understand that this is a serious accusation for which your or your loved one may face significant jail time. 

Federal Law

Per 21 U.S. Code § 841, it is illegal under federal law, in most circumstances, to manufacture, dispense, or distribute a qualifying controlled substance, or possess such a substance with the intent to distribute, manufacture, or dispense it. Also, take note that the legal ramifications of drug trafficking under federal law vary significantly depending on which schedule the trafficked substance is classified under.

To get a feel for the types of prison sentences that a convicted drug trafficker could face under federal law, let us consider a penalty commonly associated with trafficking heroin. Under federal law, an offender who is caught with 100 grams or more of heroin can be sentenced to serve 5 to 40 years in prison for an ordinary offense. However, a more serious penalty can be levied if the offender has one or more prior felony convictions.

Illinois State Law

Illinois’ main anti-drug trafficking law is contained in code section 720 ILCS 570/401 which, in a nutshell, makes it illegal for any person to knowingly deliver or manufacturer a qualifying controlled substance, or possess such a substance with the intent to deliver it or manufacture more of it. The penalty for violating this code section vary from case to case as an offender’s sentence is primarily determined based upon which controlled substance the offender was convicted of trafficking and on how much of the drug the offender was caught with.

For example, if an offender is convicted of trafficking heroin in Illinois and he or she was caught with 15 to 99 grams of the drug, then he or she is guilty of a Class X felony and can be sentenced to serve six to 30 years in prison. However, if the same offender was caught with 100 grams or more of heroin, then he or she can be ordered to serve 9 to 40 years in prison.

Let Us Assist You Today

As you can see, the legal ramifications of trafficking drugs can be quite steep at both the state and federal level and varies significantly depending on the type and quantity of the substance trafficked. This area of the law can be quite complex, but an experienced Rolling Meadows drug crime lawyer will be able to evaluate any trafficking charges pending against you and explain in detail the legal ramifications that an ensuing conviction may carry. However, it is important to remember that just because you have been charged with a drug crime does not mean that you will necessarily be convicted. No matter how bleak your case may appear, be sure to consult with a local criminal defense attorney without delay in order to best protect your legal rights. If you are facing a drug charge in Illinois, contact The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley today for help.

Source:

https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/21/841

What Does it Mean to Manufacture a Controlled Substance in Illinois?

September 6th, 2017 at 7:15 am

controlled substance, drug charges, Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer, manufacturing a controlled substance, Illinois drug crimesIn Illinois, it is illegal under state law to manufacture a controlled substance. But what does this actually mean? In general terms, it means that an individual can be convicted of a crime if he or she makes illegal drugs or other substances. However, the legal definition is quite a bit more specific.

Key Definitions re the Unlawful Manufacture of a Controlled Substance

Under the Illinois Controlled Substances Act the terms “manufacture” and “controlled substance” are carefully defined as follows below.

Manufacture: The Illinois Controlled Substances Act defines the term “manufacture” as “the production, preparation, propagation, compounding, conversion, or processing… either directly or indirectly by”:

  • Extracting substances of natural origin;
  • Chemical synthesis; or
  • A combination of extracting and chemical synthesis.

Note that this definition does include any packaging (or repackaging) of a controlled substance or labeling of its container. However, the term manufacturing does not include:

  • The preparation or compounding of a controlled substance by an ultimate user for his/her own use; or
  • Practitioners (i.e. licensed physicians, dentists, veterinarians, pharmacists, nurses, etc.), their agents, or those they supervise preparing, compounding, packaging, or labeling a controlled substance in the course of their professional practice or as part of lawful teaching, research, or chemical analysis.

Controlled Substance: Under the Illinois Controlled Substances Act, a “controlled substance” is defined as (1) a drug, immediate precursor, substance, or a synthetic drug listed in the Schedules of Article II of the Controlled Substances Act or (2) a drug, immediate precursor, or other substance designated as a controlled substance by the Department. Note that this definition does not include wine, distilled spirits, malt beverages, or tobacco.

Penalties

The penalties that a defendant who is convicted of unlawfully manufacturing a controlled substance in Illinois will face varies depending on how much of the controlled substance was manufactured. However, manufacture of a controlled substance is often tried as a Class 4 felony that is punishable by one to three years in prison and a fine of up to $25,000.

However, offenders can alternatively be placed on probation for up to 30 months (rather than being sentenced to serve time in prison) if the court finds that imprisonment is not appropriate nor necessary given the circumstances.

Reach Out to Us Today for Help

The unlawful manufacture of a controlled substance in Illinois is a serious criminal offense that is often tried as a felony carrying a hefty prison sentence. Therefore, if you have been charged with unlawfully manufacturing a controlled substance in Illinois it is vital that you retain a passionate Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer who possesses the requisite experience and knowhow to vigorously defend you. At The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley our seasoned legal time tirelessly fights for the rights of clients throughout Illinois and would be happy to fight for you. Contact our Rolling Meadows office today to schedule your initial consultation.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs5.asp?ActID=1941&ChapterID=53

Drug Paraphernalia is Illegal in Illinois

August 28th, 2017 at 11:10 am

drug paraphernalia, drug possession, Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer, Illinois drug charges, Illinois drug crimesDid you know that under some circumstances it is illegal to possess drug paraphernalia in Illinois? In fact, you can be arrested and charged with a crime if you possess drug paraphernalia with the intent to use that paraphernalia to ingest an illegal substance, regardless of whether or not you also had drugs on you at the time. 

Illinois’ Unlawful Possession of Drug Paraphernalia Statute

Under code section 720 ILCS 600/3.5 of the Illinois Compiled Statutes it is illegal to knowingly possess drug paraphernalia with the intent to use the paraphernalia to take cannabis or a controlled substance (or to prepare cannabis or a controlled substance to be taken).

Unlawful possession of drug paraphernalia is a Class A misdemeanor that is punishable by a minimum fine of $750 and that can be punished by a fine of up to $2,500 and/or up to one year in jail.

The Federal Drug Paraphernalia Statute

It should be noted that federal law also criminalizes possessing drug paraphernalia under some circumstances. For example, under code section 21 U.S. Code § 863 it is illegal for any person to (1) sell (or offer to sell) drug paraphernalia, (2) use the mail or another form of interstate commerce to transport drug paraphernalia, or (3) import or export drug paraphernalia. Violating this code section is punishable by imprisonment for up to three years and payment of a fine.

What Qualifies as Drug Paraphernalia?

Illinois law defines “drug paraphernalia” as any equipment, product, or material (other than methamphetamine manufacturing materials) that are intended to be unlawfully used in propagating, planting, cultivating, harvesting, growing, manufacturing, converting, compounding, processing, producing, testing, preparing, packaging, analyzing, storing, repackaging, concealing, containing, injecting, inhaling, ingesting, or otherwise introducing into the human body cannabis or a controlled substance.

Examples of items frequently deemed to be drug paraphernalia include:

  • Syringes,
  • Needles,
  • Small scales,
  • Glass and metal pipes,
  • Ice pipes or chillers,
  • Isomerization devices used to increase the potency of cannabis or another plant,
  • Testing equipment used to determine the effectiveness, strength, or purity of cannabis or a controlled substances,
  • Diluents and adulterants used to cut cannabis or a controlled substance,
  • Roach clips, and
  • Cocaine freebase kits.

Federal law defines drug paraphernalia in essentially the same way that Illinois law does. The exact wording of the federal definition can be found in code section 21 U.S. Code § 863(d).

Reach Out to Us for Help

If you have been charged with unlawful possession of drug paraphernalia, or some other drug-related crime in Illinois, contact the experienced Rolling Meadows drug paraphernalia possession lawyers of The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley. Our firm is committed to providing exceptional legal representation to those who are in need of strong, aggressive, and supportive legal counsel and we would be happy to assist you. To discuss your legal options with one of our experienced lawyers during a free initial consultation, contact our Rolling Meadows office today.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs3.asp?ActID=1947&ChapterID=53

A Drug Crime Conviction Could Lead to You Being Deported

April 21st, 2017 at 9:30 am

drug crime conviction, Rolling Meadows Drug Crimes Defense LawyerMany people who live in Rolling Meadows and the surrounding communities do not have United States citizenship. These individuals are living in the U.S. on a visa or as a permanent resident, or because they hold a green card. Immigrants who are in the United States legally, or even illegally, and find themselves in trouble with the law over drug offenses could face deportation or removal from the country if they are convicted.

Non-U.S. citizens who are deported are often prevented from reentering the country again for many years after their deportation. Often times, non-U.S. citizens who are convicted for drug crimes involving controlled substances or methamphetamines are more likely to be deported or removed from the country than someone who is convicted for marijuana possession based on small quantities of marijuana. The harder and more addictive the drug that is involved in the crime, the more serious the consequences may be upon conviction.

The Challenges of Deportation

When a non-U.S. citizen (also known as a foreign national or a legal alien) is convicted for a drug crime in Illinois, deportation from the United States is often one of the most serious consequences for his or her criminal activity. Deportation back to a native country can be a big problem for someone who is convicted for a drug crime, especially if he or she does not know anyone in his or her native country, has no family connections in his or her native country, or does not speak his or her native country’s language. Not only that, but it is very likely that the immigrant has built a life in the United States. He or she most likely has family, friends, a job, and a life here in Illinois and he or she could lose it all if convicted with drug charges.

Fight Your Drug Charges to Avoid Deportation

The best way to avoid being deported is to not be convicted on your drug charges. If you are not convicted, then the federal government does not have grounds to force your deportation or removal from the country. Getting the drug charges against you dropped or dismissed is your best bet.

By working with an experienced drug crimes defense lawyer, you will give yourself your best shot at success for beating your charges. An experienced criminal defense lawyer will review the facts of your case and your arrest and will identify each possible grounds for defense. Together, you and your lawyer will decide on a defense strategy.

Reach Out to Us for Help

More often than not, first time offenders who are convicted of minor drug offenses often avoid being deported. However, there is no guarantee that you will not be deported if you are convicted of a drug related offense in Illinois. Drug charges need to be taken seriously, and especially so if you are not a U.S. citizen. Please do not hesitate to contact a passionate Rolling Meadows drug crimes defense attorney immediately for assistance with your case.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs5.asp?ActID=1941&ChapterID=53

Facing Life in Jail for a Drug Crime

April 17th, 2017 at 9:16 am

drug crime, Rolling Meadows Criminal AttorneyWhen many people think about drug charges, they incorrectly assume that a conviction is not a serious matter. For instance, most minor marijuana-related offenses are only punishable by a civil fine, and most low-level drug offenses are misdemeanors. With the stakes so low, people are often not worried if they get caught by the police. However, it is possible for you to go away to jail for life over a drug offense, which is not something that should be taken lightly.

Circumstances Where You Could Face Life in Prison for a Drug Conviction

There are several circumstances when it comes to drug-related crimes that could land you in jail for the rest of your life if you are convicted. Not only could you be facing state drug laws, but you could also be facing federal drug laws, which are often more strict and carry tougher penalties.

Being Caught in Possession of Large Amounts of Cocaine

If you are caught with more than 100 grams of cocaine in your possession, even if you are a first time drug offender, then you could be sentenced to the rest of your life in jail (you could be sentenced from anywhere between 30 to 50 years in jail, which reasonably could be the rest of your lifetime). What seems patently unfair about being sent to jail for the rest of your life over a drug possession charge is that typically no one gets hurt during the commission of a drug possession crime.

Conversely, if you are caught by Illinois law enforcement with a large quantity of a cocaine mixture in your possession, and someone has died or suffered serious bodily injury as a result of your drug activities, you could face up to life in prison.

Caught Trafficking a Large Quantity of a Drug

Under federal drug laws, you can be sentenced to life behind bars if you are caught trafficking a large quantity of any of the following:

  • Cocaine mixture (500 or more grams);
  • Cocaine base (28 or more grams);
  • Fentanyl (40 or more grams);
  • Fentanyl analogue (10 grams or more);
  • Heroin (100 grams or more);
  • LSD (1 gram or more);
  • Methamphetamine (5 grams or more of pure methamphetamine, or 50 or more grams of a methamphetamine mixture); and
  • PCP (10 grams or more of pure PCP, or 100 or more grams of a PCP mixture).

Discharged Firearm Causes Death or Injury During a Drug Crime

If you are responsible for using and discharging a firearm during the commission of a drug-related offense, and someone is injured or killed as a result, you can be punished for your crimes by being given a sentence of life behind bars.

Drug Charges Are Serious. Call Us

If you are arrested for drug offenses, depending on what you allegedly did, you may face charges under state and federal law. You will need help fighting the drug charges that are levied against you. Make sure to contact a skilled Rolling Meadows criminal attorney for assistance.

Source:

https://www.dea.gov/druginfo/ftp3.shtml

Are Synthetic Drugs Illegal in Illinois?

March 27th, 2017 at 8:26 am

synthetic drugs, Rolling Meadows Drug Offenses AttorneyIn just the past few years there has been a dramatic increase in the volume of synthetic drugs available on the streets of Illinois. Synthetic drugs, also sometimes referred to as designer drugs, are substances that mimic the effect of illegal drugs and that fall outside of the regulatory authority of the Food and Drug Administration. They often contain controlled substances and because there are so many different types and formulations of synthetic drugs, it is difficult to predict the effect the synthetic drugs have from one user to the next. A common factor amongst synthetic drugs is that they are often addictive, and can be highly dangerous because of the unpredictable effect that these drugs can have on users.

Are Synthetic Drugs Illegal in Illinois?

Synthetic drugs are just as illegal as their chemically similar counterparts and are prohibited under the Illinois Controlled Substances Act. Prior to 2016, Illinois law was not very well defined when it came to prohibiting the use and possession of synthetic drugs. However, the passage of Senate Bill 1129 effectively curbed synthetic drug use among Illinoisans by making them illegal.

Synthetic drugs can include compounds such as:

  • Synthetic marijuana, i.e., spice or K2;
  • Ketamine or Special K;
  • GBL (gamma-butyrolactone);
  • Bath salts;
  • Synthetic heroin; and
  • Synthetic PCP.

Many synthetic drugs are considered Schedule 1 drugs. The sale and distribution of these synthetic drugs is a felony level offense. If you have been charged with a drug offense involving synthetic drugs, it is imperative that you get in touch with an experienced criminal defense lawyer as soon as possible.

Defending Against Synthetic Drug Charges

Anyone who is charged with a synthetic drug offense needs to work closely with a skilled and experienced criminal defense lawyer who has an extensive history working on synthetic drug cases. You could face a felony level penalty if you are convicted on a synthetic drug charge, which means you could face lengthy jail time and a significant fine. Additionally, you will have a criminal record including a drug conviction, which can have a long term impact on your life.

There are many possible defenses that could be raised, and which defenses are relevant to your particular circumstances will depend on the facts surrounding your particular alleged offense. For instance, it might be possible to raise a defense concerning your knowledge that you had possession of the synthetic drug, or it might be pertinent to raise a defense against whether you had possession of the synthetic drug. There may be issues concerning the illegal search and seizure of the synthetic drug as evidence by law enforcement, or your arrest might have been illegal. You should work closely with a criminal defense lawyer to work out your best defense strategy.

Let Us Help You with Your Case

Being charged with a synthetic drug offense is just as serious as being charged with a crime related to the real thing. Please contact a passionate Rolling Meadows drug offenses attorney immediately to be working aggressively on your case.

Sources:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs5.asp?ActID=1941&ChapterID=53

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/BillStatus.asp?DocTypeID=SB&DocNum=1129&GAID=13&SessionID=88&LegID=86576

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