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Archive for the ‘traffic violations’ tag

What Is Reckless Driving in Illinois?

August 28th, 2019 at 9:50 am

IL traffic violation attorney, IL defense lawyerIn early July, a Joliet man was charged with reckless driving, among other charges, and was placed in jail. Many people think reckless driving is a simple traffic violation, similar to being pulled over for speeding. However, in Illinois, reckless driving is a very serious charge. It could even lead to jail time. So, what is reckless driving in Illinois, and what are the possible penalties?

Reckless Driving in Illinois Defined

Illinois statute 625 ILCS 5/11-503 provides a few definitions for reckless driving. The first is operating a vehicle in such a way that shows a complete disregard for the safety of other people. Under this statute, reckless driving is also defined as using an incline, such as a hill, railroad crossing, or bridge approach, to cause a vehicle to become airborne.

While these are very dramatic and somewhat obvious definitions of reckless driving, there is another that many Illinois drivers are unaware of. This is when a motorist drives a vehicle 35 miles per hour over the posted speed limit.

Penalties for Reckless Driving

Most reckless driving charges are considered a Class A misdemeanor, including driving 35 mph over the speed limit. The penalty for this crime is up to one year in county jail.

Charges of reckless driving are upgraded to aggravated reckless driving under certain circumstances. If the reckless driving occurred in a school zone and a crossing guard or minor child became hurt, a person will likely face upgraded charges. This is a Class 4 felony that carries a possible sentence of up to three years in state prison.

When reckless driving causes any person great bodily harm or permanent disfigurement, the accused will also face charges of aggravated reckless driving. This is considered a Class 3 felony with a possible penalty of up to five years in state prison.

Defenses to Reckless Driving

After being charged with reckless driving, many people are surprised to learn of the severe consequences they face. However, it is not the hopeless situation it seems and there are defenses available.

In order to obtain a conviction, the prosecution must prove a person willfully, or intended to, drive recklessly. Intent is very difficult to prove, including in reckless driving cases. This is a very common defense used in reckless driving cases.

In reckless driving cases specifically, the prosecution must also present a Bill of Particulars. This document specifically outlines the actions of the driver that resulted in a reckless driving charge. These actions include swerving in between lanes, excessively speeding, or otherwise acting recklessly. If, after reviewing the Bill of Particulars, a judge determines there is no case, they will dismiss it and the prosecution must drop the charges. This is another very common defense used when facing reckless driving charges.

Charged with Reckless Driving? Contact an Illinois Criminal Defense Lawyer

Many people do not think reckless driving is a serious offense. Unfortunately, to law enforcement and the courts it is, and can have real consequences for those convicted. If you have been charged with reckless driving, do not treat it like a minor traffic violation. There is too much at stake. Contact our skilled Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyers at the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley. We will create a solid defense for you and give you the best chance of a successful outcome. Call us today at 847-394-3200 to schedule your free consultation.

 

Sources:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/documents/073500050K2-607.htm

https://www.theherald-news.com/2019/07/09/joliet-man-charged-with-dui-reckless-driving-charges/a9ky8l3/

Traffic Ticket FAQs

August 7th, 2019 at 9:48 am

IL traffic ticket attorneyAny time someone is pulled over for a traffic ticket, they have many questions. Will they have to go to court? Will they lose their license? Is traffic safety school an option? These are just a few of the most common questions criminal defense attorneys in Rolling Meadows are asked every day. The answers to them, and to other frequently asked questions about traffic tickets, are below.

What Should I Do if I Am Pulled Over?

If you are pulled over, it is best to cooperate with police. Turn off your engine and radio, and keep your hands visible. Do not reach for your driver’s license or insurance information until the officer asks to see them. Remain calm and friendly, and do not argue with the officer.

Do not admit guilt, even if the officer asks if you know why they pulled you over. The officer could be recording your response so they can use it against you later in court. Cooperate fully and, if the officer issues a traffic ticket, contact an attorney.

Do I Need an Attorney for a Traffic Ticket?

For certain offenses, such as driving over 26 miles per hour the posted speed limit, you will absolutely need an attorney to represent you in court. Sometimes though, even minor traffic offenses will require an attorney, depending on the facts of your case, such as if you have several points on your license already. After receiving any traffic ticket, you should call an attorney that can advise you of your legal options.

Will I Have to Go to Court?

Your traffic ticket will state whether you have to attend court for the offense. In most cases, drivers only have to appear if a conviction will result in jail time or an automatic license suspension. However, mailing in payment for the offense is considered a guilty plea. This is entered onto your public driving record, which can place you at risk for suspension in the future. As such, you may choose to go to court to fight the ticket, even if you are not required to.

Will I Lose My License?

In Illinois, drivers over the age of 21 that receive convictions for three moving violations in the span of one year will likely have their license suspended. Drivers under the age of 21 must only have two convictions for moving violations over the course of two years to have their license suspended. Certain offenses include penalties of automatic license suspension. These offenses include passing a stopped school bus or failing to yield to an emergency vehicle.

Will My Auto Insurance Rates Increase?

If you are convicted of a traffic violation, your auto insurance rates will likely increase. The amount they increase will depend on the nature of the situation and the offense you received the ticket for. If the ticket is dismissed, you are placed on court supervision, or are found not guilty, the offense is not made part of your public driving record. As such, your auto insurance rates will not increase.

Is Traffic Safety School an Option?

Individuals with a clean driving record are sometimes placed on court supervision and given the opportunity to attend traffic safety school. This is a good option, as you will not be convicted of the offense, and the ticket will not appear on your public driving record. As such, you will be less likely to lose your license in the future, and your insurance rates will not increase. While you may be able to request traffic safety school by mail, these cases are most successful when you appear in court to make the request.

Contact an Illinois Criminal Defense Lawyer for Help with Your Ticket

Getting a traffic ticket does not sound like a major event to many. However, under certain circumstances, traffic tickets can have a very detrimental impact on those that receive them. If you have received a ticket and are worried about losing your license or have to appear in court, you must speak with our skilled Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyers today. Call the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley at 847-394-3200 or contact us online for your free consultation. We will help prepare you for court and give you the best chance of keeping your license.

 

Sources:

https://www.einsurance.com/insurance-guide/illinois/auto-insurance/

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs4.asp?DocName=062500050HCh.+6+Art.+II&ActID=1815&ChapterID=49&SeqStart=85500000&SeqEnd=87500000

Can Your License be Suspended for Texting and Driving in Illinois?

June 3rd, 2019 at 5:12 pm

IL defense attorney, Illinois criminal lawyerThe last week of April was Distracted Driving Awareness Week in Illinois, and troopers all across the state participated. Over the seven-day span, they issued a total of 566 distracted driving tickets. The campaign could not have come at a better time, as drivers in Illinois are about to face much steeper penalties if they regularly text and drive.

Current Illinois Law on Texting and Driving

Currently in Illinois, it is illegal for any driver to use a handheld device while driving. This is covered under the statute 625 ILCS 5/12-610.2. This law, which is one of the stricter distracted driving laws in the country, states that no driver shall hold a cellphone or electronic device, including tablets, while they are behind the wheel of a car that is moving.

Under this law, there are only a few instances in which the use of an electronic device is legal. These include:

  • If the device is built into the car, such as a GPS;
  • When using a phone to call for emergency assistance;
  • When a cell phone is in hands-free mode, or the driver is using a headset;
  • Using a phone while parked on the shoulder of the road;
  • Using a phone on the roadway if the flow of traffic has stopped and the vehicle is in park or neutral; and
  • Using a single button on a cellphone to start or stop a call.

Anyone found using a cell phone for any reason, or in any manner, other than those described above faces penalties. Those penalties are also about to become much steeper.

Current Penalties for Texting and Driving

The penalty for texting and driving is $75 if it is the driver’s first offense. This increases to $100 for a second offense, $125 for a third offense, and $150 for a fourth and subsequent offense. In addition to these, the driver will also have to pay court costs. For example, in Rolling Meadows drivers can expect to pay anywhere from $179 to $214 in court costs. This makes the penalty for even a first offense around $300.

While these penalties are currently in effect, they are only going to last for another couple of months. After that time, drivers that are caught texting and driving will face even greater penalties.

New Penalties for Texting and Driving are On the Way

As of July 1, 2019, distracted driving will be considered a moving violation. This is different than the summary offense classification they currently fall under. While the $75 fine for a first offense will still apply, those caught in subsequent offenses will face more than just increased fines.

When the new law goes into effect this summer, those convicted of driving while distracted will have their driver’s license suspended if they have three moving violations within a period of 12 months. Those under the age of 21 face even harsher penalties under the new law. If they are convicted of two moving violations within a 24-month period, their license is suspended.

Call a Rolling Meadows Criminal Defense Lawyer and Keep Your License

In order for a driver’s license to be suspended, the driver must first be convicted of the violation. A lawyer can help drivers fight the charges and keep their license.

If you have been charged with a moving violation and now fear license suspension, a dedicated Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney at the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley can help keep it off your driving record. Call us today at 847-394-3200 to learn about the many possible defenses that are available, and how we will use them to give you your best chance of success in court. Call now, or fill out our online form for your free case evaluation.

 

Sources:

https://khqa.com/news/state/illinois-state-police-issue-over-930-citations-during-distracted-driving-week

http://ilga.gov/legislation/fulltext.asp?DocName=&SessionId=91&GA=100&DocTypeId=HB&DocNum=4846&GAID=14&LegID=110209&SpecSess=&Session=

Understanding Your Rights and Responsibilities During a Traffic Stop

March 28th, 2019 at 3:56 pm

Illinois traffic offenses, Illinois traffic stops, police search, Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney, searches and seizuresMany people do not have much interaction with the police. If they do, the chances are good that it is going to happen during a traffic stop. Even then, many people will only get pulled over two or three times while they are behind the wheel. When it happens, it is often very stressful. People imagine the worst as they sit in their car and watch the officer approaching.

In these cases, people are sometimes prepared to cooperate with the officer and do whatever they ask. These individuals do not understand that they have rights, and are not required to comply with everything an officer may request. Still, others may think they do not have to follow anything an officer instructs them to do at a traffic stop. These individuals may become belligerent or aggressive at a traffic stop.

So, what rights and responsibilities do people have when they are pulled over for a traffic stop?

Drivers Are Required to Pull Over

Any time a driver sees the flashing lights of a law enforcement vehicle, they must pull over as soon as it is safe to do so. In a few cases, a police officer may ask a driver to pull over, such as if the two vehicles are at a stop light, or if an officer walks up to the driver’s window while the vehicle is stopped. In either case, it is important that the driver complies with the officer’s request.

Under Section 11-204 of the Illinois Vehicle Code, failing to pull over for a police officer is considered fleeing the police, and it is illegal. Even if a driver simply takes too long to pull over, the officer may believe they are trying to evade the police. When this is the case, the driver will face penalties that are likely much more serious than the penalties they would face for the initial traffic violation.

Drivers Must Remain Calm

This is not written into Illinois law, but it can prevent the situation from escalating. When a driver can remain calm and speak politely to a police officer, it is less likely that the situation will develop into anything more. When drivers are aggressive and rude to police officers though, it could lead to further charges than they would have faced from the traffic stop alone. Police can misinterpret even small gestures such as the driver reaching for something in the vehicle. Due to this, it is always best if the driver keeps their hands visible and only gets out of the vehicle if the officer asks them to.

Drivers Are Not Required to Answer Questions

Drivers are required to provide a police officer with their driver’s license and registration if they are asked. However, they do not have to answer any questions the officer asks. The Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution allows individuals to refrain from answering questions that may incriminate them in a crime. This includes traffic stops.

Officers often ask a lot of questions during a traffic stop. They may ask a driver if they knew how fast they were going, or if the driver knows why they were pulled over. It is often advised that even when a driver feels as though they have done nothing wrong that they refrain from answering these questions. Anything a driver says can be held against them later on.

Drivers Do Not Have to Consent to a Search

Just because a driver has been pulled over does not give police officers the right to search the vehicle. Drivers can refuse this search, although officers are also given quite a bit of leniency during traffic stops. If they have reason to believe there is evidence of a crime in the vehicle, they can perform their search without the driver’s consent. For example, if an officer noticed drug paraphernalia in the vehicle, they might search the vehicle.

In order to search a vehicle, police officers must have probable cause. Due to this, drivers can ask police what they are searching for, or what probable cause they have.

Did You Get Into Trouble at a Traffic Stop? Contact a Rolling Meadows Criminal Defense Lawyer that can Help

Traffic stops may seem minor, but they can quickly become a much more serious situation. When this is the case, drivers should contact a dedicated Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer for help. If you were pulled over and it led to serious charges or you feel as though you were treated unfairly, contact the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley at 847-394-3200 today. We understand you have rights that may have been violated, and we will help make to correct that situation, ensuring those rights are upheld. Do not try to handle your case on your own. Call now for your free consultation.

 

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=062500050K11-204

What Are the Laws in Illinois for Passing a School Bus?

February 14th, 2019 at 12:10 am

IL traffic violation lawyerMany drivers may understand that they need to stop for school buses when the arm is extended and the lights are flashing. However, few know the severe penalties that accompany violating this traffic law. Every driver in Illinois should know that the law in Rolling Meadows and throughout Illinois takes this violation very seriously. Those convicted will even face a license suspension.

What the Law Says About Passing a Stopped School Bus

The laws surrounding passing a stopped school bus are included in the Illinois Vehicle Code, 625 ILCS 5/11-1414. This piece of legislation indicates that it is against the law to overtake, or pass, a school bus when the bus is stopped to load or unload students.

Drivers must come to a full stop when the bus operator has displayed the extended arm, or when the lights are flashing. Drivers can also not continue traveling until the driver has retracted the extended arm, turned the flashing lights off, or resumed motion. In some instances, such as when there is an issue with these signals, a bus operator may motion to other drivers that they can continue driving. In these instances, a driver may do so.

This law will apply in most cases of a vehicle approaching a school bus, even in parking lots. When a bus is traveling in one direction on a four-lane highway though, drivers traveling in the opposite two lanes are not required to stop.

The Illinois State Police also like to remind drivers that school buses are required to stop at railroad crossings. In this case, drivers traveling in the opposite direction of the bus are not required to stop.

Those behind the bus, however, may not pass if the bus is within 100 meters of the crossing. Due to the fact that school bus operators will need to engage their flashing lights and control arm when stopping the bus, it is safest for drivers behind the school bus to always stop and give the bus plenty of room.

Penalties for Passing a Stopped School Bus

The penalties for passing a stopped school bus illegally are also covered under the Illinois Vehicle Code, and they are harsh.

For a first offense, violators of this law will face a mandatory fine of at least $150. They will also face a mandatory suspension of three months.

Those charged with a second offense will face a mandatory fine of at least $500. These offenders will also have their license suspended for one full year. It is important those charged with a second offense understand that only offenses within the previous five years will be considered.

Court supervision is often an option for those convicted of breaking the law. Unfortunately, when a person is charged with illegally passing a stopped school bus, this is not a possibility.

Contact a Rolling Meadows Traffic Attorney and Keep Your License

Facing a license suspension is very serious. It can prevent people from going to work, attending school, and even visiting friends and family. The situation may seem hopeless, but it is not. A dedicated Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer can help individuals keep their license by building a strong defense for those charged. If you have been charged with failing to stop for a school bus, or another traffic violation, call the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley at 847-394-3200. We will review your case, fight for your rights, and do everything possible to prevent a license suspension. We offer free consultations, so contact us today.

 

Sources:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=062500050K11-1414

http://www.isp.state.il.us/docs/schoolbussafety5542.pdf

 

What Is Aggravated Speeding in Rolling Meadows?

January 8th, 2019 at 9:54 pm

IL defense lawyerFor most drivers in Rolling Meadows, a speeding ticket is little more than an annoyance. These tickets often do not result in anything more than a fine. There are instances when a speeding ticket can result in much more. This is when the driver is charged with aggravated speeding. An aggravated speeding charge is very serious. Anyone charged with this crime should speak to a criminal defense lawyer in Rolling Meadows right away.

What Is Aggravated Speeding?

According to Illinois statute 625 ILCS 5/11-601.5, aggravated speeding consists of driving 26 miles per hour, or more, over the posted speed limit. At one time, traveling at these speeds was considered the same as a minor speeding ticket. However, due to the fact that driving at such speeds poses an increased threat to public safety, lawmakers in the state increased the penalties for aggravated speeding in 2011.

Aggravated speeding is still considered to be a misdemeanor offense. When a driver is traveling between 26 and 34 miles per hour over the posted speed limit, they can be charged with a Class B misdemeanor. The charge becomes more serious when a driver is traveling over 35 miles per hour the posted speed limit. In these cases, drivers can be charged with a Class A misdemeanor.

Penalties for Aggravated Speeding

When a driver is charged with aggravated speeding, the penalties are much more severe than simply being charged with lesser speeding offenses. In most cases, the driver will have their driver’s license suspended temporarily. In the worst case scenarios, a driver can actually have their license revoked, which means they are permanently prohibited from driving in the state.

Fines and jail time are also real possibilities when a person has been charged with aggravated speeding. Fines can be up to $2,500, in addition to court costs, and a person may be sentenced to spend up to one year in jail.

Court Supervision for Aggravated Speeding Charges

Court supervision is a more desirable penalty for aggravated speeding. Whether or not court supervision is sentenced will be left to the judge’s discretion.

Court supervision requires a person charged with a crime to comply with certain conditions that the judge will specify. These can include community service, attending traffic school, reporting to the court or other person designated by the court, or more. Illinois statute 730 ILCS 5/5-6-3.1 outlines the full definition and requirements of court supervision within the state.

Court supervision will typically last up to two years. When determining whether or not court supervision is an option, a judge will likely determine whether or not someone is likely to re-offend, if the accused is a threat to the public, and will deem whether or not court supervision is a preferred penalty over other possibilities.

Court supervision can be considered a deferred dismissal of the charge. Upon adequate completion, all of the charges will be dismissed and it will not result in a conviction.

Get the Help You Need from a Rolling Meadows Criminal Defense Lawyer

Aggravated speeding is considered to be a very serious crime in Rolling Meadows. If convicted, one could face serious penalties such as spending up to one year in jail. While a judge may offer court supervision as a penalty, it is not a guarantee.

If you have been charged with aggravated speeding, contact a dedicated Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer as soon as possible at 847-394-3200 for a free consultation. An attorney will fight for your rights in court and is your best chance at having the charges dismissed, or being sentenced to court supervision. Aggravated speeding is a serious charge and one you certainly do not want to fight on your own.

Sources:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/documents/062500050K11-601.5.htm

http://ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=073000050K5-6-3.1

An Explanation of the Illinois Point System

May 21st, 2018 at 11:49 am

Illinois point system, moving violations, Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney, traffic offenses, traffic violationsThe Illinois Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) created a point system that tracks traffic violations that an individual accumulates on his or her driving record. Every time you receive a moving violation, a number of points are added to your driving record. After accumulating a large amount of points you risk suspension or revocation of your license. In light of this, if you are facing charges for a serious moving violation in Illinois, it is in your best interest to speak with an attorney immediately for legal assistance.

How the Points System Works

The number of points added to your driving record after a moving violation depends on the severity of the offense. For example, a charge of reckless driving on your record brings 55 points to your record. Failing to obey a stop sign adds 20 points to a driving record. Further, failing to obey a traffic signal or light carries 20 points. Points for speeding depend on the speed at which a driver is traveling, and is described below:

  • 1 to 10 miles per hour over the limit = 5 points
  • 11 to 14 miles per hour over the limit = 15 points
  • 15 to 25 miles per hour over the limit = 20 points
  • Going over 25 miles per hour = 50 points

Penalties for Points

But what do these points mean, and what is the harm in accumulating points on a license? The more points accumulated, the harsher penalty a driver can face. Accumulating points puts you at risk of having your license suspended, as highlighted below:

  • 0 to 14 points = no action taken against your license
  • 15 to 44 points = potential two-month suspension
  • 45 to 74 points = potential three-month suspension
  • 75 to 89 points = potential six-month suspension
  • 90-99 points = potential nine-month suspension
  • 100 or more points = 12-month suspension

Additionally, three or more moving violations in one 12-month period also puts you at risk for license suspension.

Points will stay on your driving record for four to five years. After this period of time, they are removed from your record and your overall point total decreases. Currently, there are no driving courses available in Illinois that can be used to decrease the number of points on your license.

Contact an Attorney for Immediate Help

If you have received a moving violation, you may not think it is a big deal. However, these charges can quickly add up points on your driving record and put you at the risk of having your license suspension. Ultimately, in many cases your best option is to fight the charges with the help of a talented Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney. Our dedicated legal team is available to assist you throughout each step of your case.

Sources:

https://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/publications/pdf_publications/dsd_dc19.pdf

http://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/departments/drivers/losepriv.html

The Consequences of Speeding in a Construction Zone

February 23rd, 2018 at 8:22 am

Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney, speeding, traffic offenses, construction zone speeding, traffic violationsSpeeding in any area is an offense punishable by hefty fines. This is especially true in construction zones. Workers are in these areas performing road maintenance and it is important to slow down and watch for them. Plus, heavy equipment is often in use and these vehicles can cause serious damage to you and your vehicle.

Statistics show, however, the motorists are more likely to be injured or killed in construction zone accidents than workers. Between 2010 and 2014, there were an average of 27 fatalities each year. Only an average of  two of those involved workers.

Traffic violations in construction zones are no laughing matter. While most violations involve speeding, using your cell phone, or failing to yield can also get you a ticket. The speed limit in a construction zone is 45 mph. If you are given a ticket for exceeding this speed limit, you will face a $375 fine and be ordered to appear in court. The penalties get much steeper on subsequent offenses. If you are caught a second time, the fine goes up to $1,000 and you will have your license suspended for 90 days.

If you pay the ticket, you will be convicted of the crime. The conviction will go on your driving record. You will be assessed points, which will make your car insurance premiums go up. If you have too many points on your driving record, your license could be suspended.

As you can see, something as simple as going too fast in a construction zone can wreak havoc on your driving record, and your wallet. That is why it’s important to know the laws and find out what you can do if you are given a ticket.

What the Law Says

Under Illinois Law 625 ILCS 5/11-605.1, a motorist may not exceed the speed limit in a construction zone (45 mph), whether or not workers are present. Electronic speed-detecting devices may be used in construction zones.

Construction zones are defined as areas in which a government agency has posted signage advising motorists that they are approaching a construction or maintenance speed zone and that a special speed limit sign must be posted because the preexisting established speed limit is considered unsafe. The signs must be of a pre-approved design, but no flashing lights are required. The signs must adequately warn drivers that they are approaching a construction zone. They must also indicate the maximum speed limit as well as the amount of the minimum fine if the speed limit is violated.

Contact Us Today for Help

Sometimes motorists are not aware of speed limits in special areas. Maybe a construction zone is not properly marked. Perhaps no workers were present and the driver assumed that the speed limit did not apply.

Speed limit laws can be confusing. If you have received a ticket for speeding in a construction zone, The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley can help. Passionate Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney Christopher Cosley can help provide an effective defense. Reach out to us today for more information.

Sources:

http://www.idot.illinois.gov/assets/uploads/files/travel-information/pamphlets-&-brochures/workzone%20il%20fact%20sheet.pdf

http://ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/documents/062500050K11-605.1.htm

How is Reckless Driving Proven in Illinois?

December 28th, 2017 at 5:38 pm

reckless driving charges, reckless driving citations, Rolling Meadows reckless driving lawyer, traffic offenses, traffic violationsReckless driving, as defined under section 625 ILCS 5/11-503 of the Illinois Code, is committed in Illinois when a driver (a) drives with a willful or wanton disregard for the safety of people or property, or (b) knowingly uses an incline, bridge approach, railway crossing, or hill to make their vehicle go airborne. Furthermore, any person who drives recklessly and as a result causes permanent disability/disfigurement or great bodily harm to another can be convicted of aggravated reckless driving. But how can it be proven that someone drove recklessly? Reckless driving cases differ from case to case; however, consider the following various approaches that are commonly used to prove acts of reckless driving in Illinois.

Approaches Commonly Used to Prove Reckless Driving

If you choose to fight a reckless driving ticket in Illinois the opposition will be forced to present evidence in court establishing that you either drove with a willful or wanton disregard for safety or that you intentionally made your vehicle go airborne. This can be proven in a variety of different ways, but before discussing these various approaches let us take a quick look at what constitutes “willful or wanton” conduct.

Willful and wanton conduct is one of those legal phrases that can be a bit hard to pin a precise definition to, but in the context of reckless driving cases it is best to think of it as conduct that is engaged in with a conscious disregard for, or a with a reckless indifference to, the potential consequences of such an action.

Proving that a driver acted with willful or wanton disregard for safety is often accomplished in reckless driving cases via one or more of the following types evidence:

  • Eyewitness Evidence: Generally the police officer who issued the reckless driving citation at issue will testify to the manner in which he or she personally witnessed the accused driving. Other eyewitnesses, perhaps someone who got into an accident with the accused, may also be called forward to testify about what they saw.
  • Video Evidence: Nowadays, many police cruisers are equipped with dashboard cams and if such a camera captured the manner in which you were driving prior to being pulled over then this video may be presented as evidence against you. Additionally, footage captured on a cell phone by a witness may also be available as people frequently film the unusual behavior of others on their smartphones these days.
  • Radar Evidence: Many reckless driving citations issued in Illinois are based solely on a driver’s speed. When this is the case the issuing police officer will have likely captured evidence of your speed on their radar gun and will present such evidence, along with proof that his or her radar gun was properly calibrated, in court.

Charged with Reckless Driving in Illinois?

If you have been charged with reckless driving in Illinois, experienced Rolling Meadows reckless driving lawyer Christopher Cosley is here to help. Mr. Cosley has extensive experience providing legal assistance to clients who have been charged with a wide array of different traffic violations and would be happy to assist you. While each case is different, Mr. Cosley is often able to help clients keep traffic offenses off the public record, avoid increased insurance rates, prevent having their driver’s license suspended, and reduce or eliminate the other various consequences commonly associated with traffic violations. To find out what The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley can do for you schedule an initial consultation at our Rolling Meadows office today.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=062500050K11-503

How Illinois’ DMV Point System Works

December 21st, 2017 at 8:19 am

DMV point system, driving record, penalty points, Rolling Meadows traffic violations lawyer, traffic violationsUnder Illinois’ DMV point system, Illinois drivers are assigned penalty points for a wide array of traffic violations. The more serious the violation the more points that the DMV will add to the driver’s record. For example, a driver who fails to obey a traffic sign will generally have 20 points added to his or her driver’s license while, on the other hand, a driver who is caught driving recklessly will often be assigned 55 points.

If you have recently accumulated a few minor traffic citations, or if you have broken a serious rule of the road, then it is important to be aware of how many points you currently have and the impact that these points can have on your ability to retain your driving privileges in Illinois.

The Impact of Points on Your Driving Record

Under Illinois’ DMV point system, a driver who receives three or more traffic citations within a 12-month period will generally have accumulated enough points on his or her record to be penalized with an administrative revocation or suspension of his or her driver’s license.

Furthermore, if your license is suspended due to having added too many points to your record during a 12-month period, then the length of the suspension is determined in part by how many points you currently have on your record and in part by whether or not the DMV has revoked or suspended your driver’s license within the past seven years.

Is it Possible to Reduce the Number of Points that I Have?

In other states a qualifying driver can reduce the number of points that have accumulated on his or her license by completing a driving safety course. Unfortunately, however, this option is not currently available to drivers in Illinois.

The only way to have points removed from your Illinois driver’s license is to wait the prescribed time period. Still, under some circumstances, Illinois drivers may be able to avoid adding points to their records in the first place by enrolling in a defensive driving course. This is because some courts in Illinois will allow a driver to take such a course in order to prevent additional points from being added to their record. Also, a local traffic violations lawyer may be able to help limit the number of points that will be added to your record by negotiating a reduced offense on your behalf.

Need Legal Advice? Contact Rolling Meadows Traffic Violations Lawyer Chris Cosley

If you have received a traffic ticket in Illinois and would like to learn more about how such a citation may impact the number of points on your record, contact dedicated Rolling Meadows traffic violations lawyer Chris Cosley today to schedule a free initial consultation. At The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley we are often able to successfully negotiate reduced offenses for our traffic violations clients. Call 847-394-3200 today.

Source:

https://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/publications/pdf_publications/dsd_dc19.pdf

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