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Archive for the ‘traffic citations’ tag

Traffic Citations and Your Driving Record in Illinois

May 24th, 2017 at 7:13 am

traffic citations, Rolling MeadowsStandard moving violations will usually stay on your driving record for up to five years from the time you are convicted, according to the Illinois Secretary of state. Standard moving violations include:

  • Speeding;
  • Disobeying a stop sign;
  • Disobeying a traffic light; and
  • Improper lane usage.

However, traffic violations whose penalties result in a suspension or revocation can stay on your driving record for at least seven years. That timeline will not start until the date you get your license reinstated.  The caveat to that general rule are traffic violations that include alcohol or drugs, like a DUI for example. Those kinds of convictions may stay on your Illinois driving record for the rest of your life.

Is There Any Way I Can Keep a Traffic Ticket Off My Driving Record?

That is a question for your Cook County traffic violation attorney. Generally, the only way to accomplish that is to receive court supervision as a punishment for your traffic violation or getting the charge dropped or dismissed.

Traffic violation convictions not only cause your insurance rates to increase but they also count as points towards getting your license suspended. When faced with a traffic violation, it is important that you speak with an experienced and knowledgeable traffic violation defense lawyer to give you the best shot at keeping traffic infractions off of your record.

Understand Your Rights

It is important that you understand what rights you have at a traffic stop. When a police officer stops you and begins asking questions, it is usually not polite conversation. He or she is beginning their investigation into whether or not you have committed a moving violation or a more serious offense.

The majority of convictions in Illinois occur as a result of an arrestee giving more incriminating evidence than was necessary to the police.  Questions that are appropriate to answer include but are not limited to the following:

  • What is your name?
  • Where are you going?
  • Do you have your driver’s license?
  • Do you have proof of insurance?
  • Do you know why I have stopped you? (simple yes or no)

Questions and request intended to incriminate you include:

  • Can I search your car?
  • Have you been drinking?
  • Do you have anything illegal in the car?

When You Need a Lawyer

The criminal justice system is a complex terrain that requires a knowledgeable and experienced Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer. Attorney Christopher M. Cosley is a respected and proven attorney. At The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley, you will receive dedicated and compassionate representation. Contact us at 847-394-3200, 24 hours a day, to schedule your consultation and get the representation you deserve.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs3.asp?ChapterID=49&ActID=1815

Traffic Violations in Illinois

September 22nd, 2016 at 3:35 pm

Traffic Violations in IllinoisMany people have received a traffic citation for a mistake made behind the wheel. You might have been driving too fast, may have failed to use your turn signals, or may have placed your vehicle somewhere it should not have been. Furthermore, many people who end up with a traffic citation are unsure what to do about it. In this situation, contacting an experienced traffic offense lawyer could help.

Basics of A Traffic Citation

At its core, a traffic citation is a charge for violating a state or municipal traffic law. The citation is a piece of paper, or ticket, that includes your information, the information about your vehicle, and your alleged offense. The ticket provides you with the statute of the law that you allegedly violated along with the fine you are required to pay, and provides instructions on how to pay the ticket, or details about when you are required to appear in court.

For the most part, most traffic law violations are merely infractions of the law, which is punishable only by a fine. Infractions are mostly minor offenses. More serious traffic violations can rise to the criminal level, such as driving while under the influence of drugs and/or alcohol. These more serious traffic violations can carry steep fines and even jail time.

Traffic violations are broken down by the type of offense you have committed, and the seriousness of your offense. For instance, traffic violations are classified as either moving violations, or non-moving violations, which refers to whether your alleged offense involved a moving vehicle. For instance, speeding, driving without a fastened seatbelt, DUI, and failing to obey stop signs are all considered moving violations because each of these offenses involves a moving vehicle. Non-moving violations include things like driving an unregistered vehicle, not having your license plates attached to your vehicle, and parking offenses.

Next Steps After Receiving a Traffic Citation

When you receive a traffic ticket, you usually have a few options on how to proceed. For the most trivial of traffic violations, most people simply choose to pay the fine and be done with the ticket. Paying the ticket, however, means admitting guilt for your violation of the law. If you are generally a good driver who rarely receives tickets, then simply paying your fine might be how you choose to resolve your traffic ticket.

However, if you believe that the issuance of a ticket to you was a mistake or is wrong, you can dispute your ticket and fight it. To dispute your traffic citation, you must personally appear in court during your scheduled court appearance timeslot, and enter a not guilty plea. Next, you will be scheduled a trial date, where you can fight your traffic citation.

If you plan on fighting your traffic citation, you need to speak with an experienced Rolling Meadows traffic offenses lawyer soon after getting your ticket. You will have a scheduled court appearance time, and your lawyer may need to work quickly.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=062500050K11-601.5

Higher Speed Limit Ushers in New Work-Zone Safety Rules

May 7th, 2014 at 7:00 am

Higher Speed Limit Ushers in New Work-Zone Safety Rules | Illinois LawThe beginning of 2014 brought a change in the speed limit posted on interstates in Illinois to 70 miles per hour from the previous limit of 65 miles per hour. In light of the increased speed limit applicable to roadways across the state of Illinois, a news outlet recently reported that extra safety measures will also apply to Illinois construction zones, including reduce-speed signs and speed-indicator posted signs.

The Effect on Work-Zone Speeds

Studies indicate that on average, a car going 70 miles per hour needs 470 feet to come to a complete stop, while cars traveling at 65 miles per hour need just 405 feet to stop safely. Heavier cars, including trucks and semi-trailers, require even more distance. The safety measures for work zones, including the signs mentioned above, are used in areas where workers are present in an effort to get drivers to pay attention and slow down.

With the new speed limit in effect for just a few months, it is hard to determine what the effect the speed limit has had on work-zone speeds. The short time the change has been in effect is only one factor; this winter’s severe weather and the cool and rainy spring have pushed construction back significantly, making it difficult to measure the overall impact of the change in speed. It is worth noting that the Illinois Department of Transportation opposed the increased speed limit due to safety concerns.

Harsher Penalties

Since 2003, fines have increased in Illinois for traffic citations, including speeding in a work zone, and crashing in a work zone causing injuries or fatalities. First time offenders of work-zone speeding will incur a fine of $375, with a $1000 fine for the second such offense, in addition to a possible license suspension for additional violations. Car accidents that result in work-zone deaths may involve felony criminal charges for reckless homicide.

Despite the increased speed limit, the posted speeds in work-zones are 55 miles per hour, and 45 miles per hour if workers are present. Photo-radar vans are one tool law enforcement uses across the state to ensure speed limits are followed in work-zones. The vans are capable of capturing images of both the driver of a vehicle and the vehicle’s license plate, record the vehicle’s speed, and post the time and date. There are signs to warn drivers that such vans are being used, and the vans are distinguishable by their markings. Troopers send tickets to offenders through certified mail.

Additional Safety Measures

The Illinois Department of Transportation continues to use electronic message boards to alert drivers of construction zones and traffic, and is exploring other ways to inform drivers of traffic patterns through technology. However, frontline flaggers remain as a basic early warning system to identify erratic drivers, get drivers’ attention, and warn of a backup in traffic or other events motorists should be aware of while approaching a work zone. The Department plans on exploring other safety measures and making changes as necessary when the effects of the higher speed limit can be more accurately measured.

If you have been charged with a traffic offense…

It is advisable to contact an attorney experienced in traffic ticket cases. Contact the attorneys at the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley in Rolling Meadows today for a consultation. We have successful experience representing clients charged with traffic offenses ranging from speeding tickets to accident related fatalities.

 

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