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Archive for the ‘repeat offender’ tag

Fighting a Third or Fourth DUI Charge

October 18th, 2018 at 11:00 am

IL DUI attorney, IL drunk driving lawyerOne-third of drivers arrested for drunk driving are repeat offenders, according to Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD). National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) data revealed that for some states, 47 percent of DUI offenders are repeat offenders. Ultimately, if you have already been convicted of one DUI, there a high chance that you will be charged with another. Moreover, after a second DUI conviction in Illinois, the penalties become much higher.

Aggravated DUI

An aggravated DUI is a serious offense — one that results in mandatory imprisonment or community service terms not being eligible for suspension or reduction. Additionally, aggravated DUI charges result in a minimum of 480 hours of community service or 10 days of imprisonment for those out on probation or conditional discharge. Aggravated DUI is charged when the offender was driving under the influence:

  • In a school zone, while the school speed was in effect, and caused a crash resulting in bodily harm;
  • While driving a school bus with one or more minors as occupants;
  • And caused a serious bodily harm;
  • And caused a death;
  • Without vehicle liability insurance; and
  • In many other circumstances.

Additionally, aggravated DUI is charged whenever the offender has already had two DUI convictions, according to the Illinois Secretary of State.

Third DUI Conviction

  • Class 2 felony (three to seven years imprisonment);
  • License revocation for 10 years minimum; and
  • Vehicle registration suspension.

If the offender’s BAC was 0.16 or greater, the penalties include:

  • Mandatory 90-day  imprisonment; and
  • Mandatory minimum fine of $2,500.

If the offender committed the DUI while transporting a child under 16 years old, the penalties include:

  • Mandatory fine of $25,000; and
  • Mandatory 25 days of community service in a child-benefiting program.

Fourth DUI

  • Class 2 felony;
  • License revocation for life; and
  • Vehicle registration suspension.

If the offender’s BAC was 0.16 or greater, the penalties include:

  • Mandatory minimum fine of $5,000.

If the offender committed the DUI while transporting a child under 16 years old, the penalties include:

  • Mandatory fine of $25,000; and
  • Mandatory 25 days of community service in a child-benefiting program.

Fifth DUI Conviction

  • Class 1 felony (four to 15 years imprisonment);
  • License revocation for life; and
  • Vehicle registration suspension.

If the offender’s BAC was 0.16 or greater, the penalties include:

  • Mandatory minimum fine of $5,000.

If the offender committed the DUI while transporting a child under 16 years old, the penalties include:

  • Mandatory fine of $25,000; and
  • Mandatory 25 days of community service in a child-benefiting program.

Sixth or Subsequent DUI Conviction

  • Class X felony (six to 30 years imprisonment);
  • License revocation for life; and
  • Vehicle registration suspension.

If the offender’s BAC was 0.16 or greater, the penalties include:

  • Mandatory minimum fine of $5,000.

If the offender committed the DUI while transporting a child under 16 years old, the penalties include:

  • Mandatory fine of $25,000; and
  • Mandatory 25 days of community service in a child-benefiting program.

Call a Rolling Meadows Criminal Defense Attorney Today

It is vital to work with an experienced Rolling Meadows felony DUI attorney if you have been charged with a third or subsequent DUI offense. Contact Christopher M. Cosley today at 847-394-3200.

 

Sources:

https://one.nhtsa.gov/people/outreach/traftech/1995/tt085.htm

https://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/publications/pdf_publications/dsd_a118.pdf

https://www.madd.org/statistics/

Minorities Affected by Illinois Juvenile Law

May 20th, 2014 at 4:12 pm

juvenile offense, minorities and crime, Chicago juvenile crime lawyer, repeat offender, pleading guilty, juvenile court, Illinois juvenile lawAccording to an article recently published, a study shows that the Illinois law, which required juveniles charged with certain serious crimes to be tried as adults, may be discriminatory.

The imposition of the law also takes away judges’ discretion in these cases while also increasing the likelihood that the same juveniles will become repeat offenders in the future, according to the study.

Juvenile Justice Initiative

As part of the study, the Initiative considered 257 juvenile cases heard in Cook County between 2010 and 2012, in which juveniles were charged as adults in keeping with the law. All but one of the cases involved a defendant who was considered a minority. Out of these juveniles, over half of those that were transferred ended up pleading guilty to a lesser charge in adult court, which would not have caused the case to be transferred out of juvenile court had they been originally charged with the lesser offense.

The conclusion of the study found that by transferring a juvenile case to adult court, the offender’s chances at rehabilitation are seriously diminished. Also, the juveniles instead spend their time in adult jail, which correlates to a higher risk for reoffending and taking part in a violent crime. One of the contributing factors to this is that juveniles involved in the adult court process can remain in prison for up to a year before their case is heard, while their counterparts who have pending cases in juvenile court may spend just a month or so in detention.

Future Legislation

As a result of the study’s findings, the Initiative is pointing to legislation that would amend the current Illinois law to avoid an automatic transfer of certain juvenile cases to adult court. Instead, the group wants to focus on legislation that would allow judges to exercise their discretion in determining which cases should be transferred in light of the circumstances and the individual defendant. Advocates tout the inherent advantages of having a judge, who is sitting in the best position to determine the circumstances of a person and a crime and make the decision to transfer a case, instead of a blanket approach instituted by the General Assembly.

Current Law

Illinois is not the only state to keep such a law on its books. The law was enacted in the early 1980s and requires juveniles between the ages of 15 and 17 years old to be automatically transferred to adult court when charged with serious offenses including murder, armed robbery, aggravated sexual assault, and aggravated battery with a firearm. Once a juvenile is tried as an adult, future charges will also be heard in adult court, no matter the severity of the offense.

Often, the problem is that juveniles are interrogated by officers without a lawyer present, are charged as an adult. They then plead guilty to a lesser charge as the result of bargaining. There is never an opportunity for the juvenile to be heard in court or have the case tried, which results in a situation in which the juvenile’s fate is essentially sealed at the point of arrest.

Criminal Defense Attorney

While some may consider the need for this change to be obvious, it may take a while to be put into practice if it approved at all. In the meantime, those charged with any criminal offense as a juvenile, but especially those who likely face a transfer to adult court, should consult with an experienced criminal defense attorney as soon as possible. Contact the attorneys at the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley to schedule a consultation to discuss your case. We serve clients in Cook County and the surrounding area.

Habitual Offender to get Mental Health Treatment

August 2nd, 2013 at 12:20 pm

The Chicago Sun Times recently published a story about a woman who has been arrested 396 times since 1978. She is now being housed in the Logan Correctional Center from which she is to be released in November of this year.

TheresaIf the Chairman of the Illinois Prisoner Review Board has anything to say about it, Shermain Miles will be admitted to a mental health and substance abuse program as soon as she completes her sentence with the Illinois Department of Corrections. Her current counselor states that she has been “very cooperative and informed” while receiving care for her mental health issues while she has been in Logan.

While she has applied to several different programs and considered different options for her releases, the one that was rejected was for her to be paroled to the ward where she assaulted a council member. Most of her arrests have been for thefts, 92 in fact. She was arrested 65 different times for disorderly conduct, 59 times for crimes such as prostitution, and another 5 times for robbery related offenses. She has also been arrested under at least 83 different known identities.

Alderman James Cappleman was quoted as saying that Ms. Miles is a telling case that shows exactly what is wrong with Illinois’ prison system. There are an overwhelming amount of people that are in the prison system who need mental health treatment as well as substance abuse and addiction treatment. He also stated that it is time to stop the revolving door system that is currently in place and get offenders that help that they need to become better citizens.

Whether you are a first time offender or a repeat offender like the above story, an Illinois criminal defense attorney can present the best possible defense in your criminal case.

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