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Archive for the ‘license revocation’ tag

Differences Between a License Suspension and Revocation in Illinois

September 26th, 2019 at 7:39 am

IL defense lawyer, IL criminal defense attorneyMany people use the terms ‘license suspension’ and ‘license revocation’ interchangeably. While it is true that each will take away your driving privileges for some time, there are differences between a license suspension and revocation. If you are facing charges for a DUI, underage drinking, or any other offense that could result in you losing your license, it is important you understand what those differences are.

A Driver’s License Suspension in Illinois

A driver’s license suspension in Illinois means that you still have your driver’s license, but it is invalid for a period of time. During this time, you are unable to drive.

In Illinois, a license may be suspended under definite terms, or it could be suspended indefinitely. Definite suspensions have an end date associated with them. This is the date you are able to drive again if you pay the proper fees and complete any requirements, such as attending a substance abuse treatment program.

Indefinite suspensions do not have an end date. In order for your license to be reinstated, you must complete certain tasks, such as paying speeding tickets in full. As long as you do not take this action, your license remains suspended indefinitely.

A Driver’s License Revocation in Illinois

If you have your driver’s license revoked in Illinois, you no longer have a driver’s license. You are not able to reinstate it. Instead, you must go through the entire process of applying for your driver’s license again. That means taken written tests and road tests, and possibly even attending a driver’s education training course.

If you have had your driver’s license revoked, you will also need to obtain permission from the Illinois DMV to apply for your license. You must also meet all the terms required of you and make payments for any outstanding fines or penalties.

Causes for a License to be Revoked or Suspended

Often when people think about a driver’s license being suspended or revoked, they think it was due to driving under the influence charges. However, there are many reasons your driver’s license may be revoked or suspended in Illinois. These include:

  • Driving without proper auto insurance
  • Serious traffic offenses, such as leaving the scene of an accident
  • Underage drinking
  • Driving under the influence
  • Outstanding fines
  • Multiple traffic violations

Each case involving a suspended or revoked license is unique. Sometimes you may get your license back simply by paying a fine, while other times there may be other strict requirements. Anyone that has had their license suspended or revoked in Illinois should speak to a criminal defense attorney that can help them get their driving privileges back.

Need Help Getting Your License Back? Call Our Illinois Criminal Defense Attorney

If you have had your driver’s license suspended or revoked, you need the help of our talented Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney. At the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley, we can advise on your legal options, and the actions you must take to regain your license. Call us today at 847-394-3200 or fill out our online form to schedule your free consultation.

 

Sources:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=062500050K11-501

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=023500050K6-16

Scott’s Law: Move Over or Possibly Lose Your License

May 30th, 2019 at 5:09 pm

IL traffic attorneyIn the first two and a half months of the year, 13 State Troopers have been hit by vehicles while working on the side of the road. In early January, one was fatally struck and killed while working the scene of an accident. The number is too high in the state, and Illinois State Police are trying to change that. With a blitz on social media, they are reminding all drivers about Scott’s Law, and what can happen if they fail to comply and reduce speed to avoid an accident.

Scott’s Law

According to 625 ILCS 5/11-907, Scott’s Law requires all motorists to move to another lane when approaching an emergency vehicle on the side of the road. The law was named after Lieutenant Scott Gillen, a firefighter with the Chicago Fire Department that lost his life after being struck by a passing vehicle while he was working the scene of an emergency. It is also sometimes called simply the “Move Over Law.”

The law applies to any vehicle that has flashing lights, a siren, or both. Police vehicles are the most common emergency vehicles seen along the side of the road, but the law also applies to ambulances, firefighters, and even tow trucks in some cases. Construction vehicles could also fall under the definition of emergency vehicle according to Scott’s Law definition. Motorists wishing to keep safe, and avoid penalties, should simply move over when approaching flashing lights ahead.

The law only states that drivers must move to another lane if the lights or siren on the emergency vehicle are activated. When changing lanes is unsafe, drivers are expected to slow down and proceed with due caution past the emergency vehicles.

Penalties for Violating Scott’s Law

Drivers found in violation of Scott’s Law will face mandatory fines. The minimum fine is $100, but that cost could increase to $10,000, depending on the nature of the violation and if the driver caused an accident when failing to move over.

However, drivers found in violation of this law will face more than just fines. They could potentially lose their license for a long time, depending on the circumstances.

If the driver caused an accident that involved property damage, the Secretary of State will revoke the driver’s license for 90 days. If the driver caused an accident resulting in injury, the driver will lose their license for 180 days. If the driver caused a fatal accident, the driver’s license is suspended for two years. They could also face other charges as well, such as involuntary manslaughter.

Contact a Rolling Meadows License Reinstatement Lawyer to Get Your License Back

If you have had your license revoked due to Scott’s Law or any other traffic violation, you need to contact a skilled Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney. At the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley, we are very familiar with the state’s system for revoking, and reinstating, licenses. We want to put that experience to work for you and help you get your license back as quickly as possible. Call us today at 847-394-3200 for a free consultation and we can begin discussing your case.

 

Source:

https://chicago.cbslocal.com/2019/03/19/illinois-police-report-troopers-struck/

License Revocation at Discretion of the Court

November 28th, 2018 at 2:35 pm

IDMost moving violations do not end up with the driver being sentenced to a license revocation. In fact, even when serious bodily injury has occurred, the driver is typically allowed to drive that very same day so long as they are not seriously injured. However, in some circumstances, a court may revoke a driver’s license without a hearing, as per Illinois statute 625 ILCS 5/6-206 Discretionary authority to suspend or revoke license or permit; right to a hearing.

If a driver’s behavior falls under one of 48 different categories, they may lose their license immediately, and without a hearing, if the court believes that is the best course of action to keep other road users safe. These specific behaviors and actions include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • The driver committed an offense that requires license or permit revocation upon conviction;
  • The driver has been convicted of three or more moving traffic violations in any 12 month period;
  • The driver has repeatedly been involved in motor vehicle collisions, or has repeatedly been convicted of traffic offenses to a degree that indicates lack of ability to exercise ordinary and reasonable care, or disrespect for traffic laws and the safety of other people;
  • While driving illegally, the driver caused bodily injury to another road user;
  • The driver utilized a fake driver’s license;
  • The driver refused to submit to an examination or failed an examination under Section 620-7;
  • The driver used false statements or submitted false facts in order to gain a driver’s license;
  • The driver possessed, displayed, or attempted to display a driver’s license that was not their own;
  • The driver operated a motor vehicle on a state highway with an invalid driver’s license;
  • The driver fled the scene of a crash in which $1,000 or more in property damage occurred;
  • The driver, while driving, was found to be possessing an illegal controlled substance on their person or in their vehicle; and
  • The driver refused to submit to a breath test or their blood alcohol content was found to be 0.08 or higher while driving a motor vehicle.

At Least Seven Million People Across the Country Have Lost Their License Due to Debt

Statistics show that at least seven million Americans have had their licenses revoked or suspended simply because they failed to pay their traffic fine debts. The total number is likely much higher than seven million, and here in Illinois a driver’s license can be revoked for repeatedly getting traffic citations to the “degree that indicates . . . disrespect for the traffic laws. Opponents of these types of laws believe that they overly penalize the poor—those who cannot afford to pay their parking and speeding tickets.

Call a Rolling Meadows License Revocation Attorney

If your driver’s license has been revoked or suspended, or you are facing another moving violation that will put you over the top in terms of points on your license, you need to call a Cook County criminal defense lawyer. Call skilled Cook County criminal defense attorney Christopher M. Cosley today at 847-394-3200 for a free consultation.

 

Sources:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/public-safety/more-than-7-million-people-may-have-lost-drivers-licenses-because-of-traffic-debt/2018/05/19/97678c08-5785-11e8-b656-a5f8c2a9295d_story.html?utm_term=.b3c9b1b08b8a

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=062500050K6-206

Changes to Illinois Traffic Safety Laws in 2016

January 27th, 2016 at 11:07 am

Illinois defense attorney, Illinois traffic offense lawyer, Illinois DUI attorney, Many new traffic safety laws became effective on January 1, 2016, and Illinois drivers need to be aware of what changes have taken place so that they are not caught off guard by law enforcement if they happen to violate one of the new laws without knowing. Of particular importance to the typical Illinois driver are the changes to some traffic offenses and DUI laws. A synopsis of all of the changes that take effect in 2016 can be found on the Cyber Drive Illinois website.

Changes to Traffic Offenses

  • Aggravated speeding can be charged whenever a driver speeds past a school bus or through a construction site going more than 26 miles per hour over the posted speed limit, pursuant to HB 1453 PA 99-0212;
  • If a driver is involved in an accident that causes the death of another, the Secretary of State will revoke the driving privileges of the individual responsible for the death. Revocation is effective 90 days after the revocation notification is mailed, pursuant to HB 3670 PA 99-0297;
  • Pursuant to HB 4074 PA 99-0300, when an Illinois resident has had a license revocation in another state for more than 10 years, he or she may apply for an Illinois driver’s license, if all of the requirements for reinstatement are satisfied; and
  • Temporary stop signs put into place be the Illinois Department of Transportation must be treated as permanent stop signs in accordance with SB 1388 PA 99-0124.

Changes to DUI Laws

  • After serving a five year revocation of their driver’s license, individuals who have been convicted of four or more DUIs will now be eligible to request an Illinois Restricted Driving Permit for the Illinois Secretary of State’s Office, pursuant to HB 1446 PA 99-1446. As a condition of approval of the request for the Restricted Driving Permit, the driver’s vehicle must be equipped with a breath alcohol ignition interlock device for the remainder of the individual’s driving lifetime;
  • Individuals who would like to have their driver’s license reinstated after being convicted for a second or subsequent DUI charge must obtain a Restricted Driving Permit and have an breath alcohol ignition interlock device installed in their vehicle for a period of five years before seeking the reinstatement of their driver’s license, pursuant to HB 3533 PA 99-0297; and
  • Pursuant to SB 0627 PA 99-0040, those arrested for DUI are now encouraged to sign the “Warning to Motorist” document that is read to these individual’s upon arrest. Refusal to sign the warning will be noted by law enforcement on the bottom of the document.

Call the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley

The above identified changes to traffic and DUI laws took effect January 1, 2016. If you have been charged with a DUI or a traffic offense and you are being charged under one of the above new laws, you should contact a skilled Rolling Meadows criminal lawyer immediately. Our attorneys are prepared to provide you with a consultation and assist you with your case.

 

Source:

http://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/newlaws16.pdf

New Law Could Let People With Four DUI Convictions Get Restricted Driving Privileges

November 17th, 2015 at 2:48 pm

Illinois drunk driving attorney, Illinois defense attorney, Illinois criminal lawyer,One of the consequences of being convicted for driving under the influence is that your driver’s license will be revoked. Under the current laws of Illinois, it is illegal to drive a motor vehicle while under the influence of drugs, alcohol, or a combination of both. Upon conviction, a person will lose their driver’s license; more specifically, the Secretary of State will revoke their driving privileges.

The revocation period depends on the number of prior offenses:

  • For a first offense, license revocation is for a period of one year, and for those under the age of 21, revocation is for two years;
  • For a second offense committed in a period of 20 years, license revocation is for a period of and years;
  • For a third offense, license revocation is for a period of 10 years; and
  • For a fourth any subsequent offenses, license revocation is for life.

Needless to say, being convicted of a DUI seriously impacts a person’s life by taking away their ability to drive.

New Law Changes Driver’s License Revocation for Fourth DUI Offense

A new state law, referred to as House Bill 1446 or Public Act 099-0290, will be taking effect on January 1, 2016 and will allow individuals in Illinois who have been convicted of four DUIs to be able to apply for a restricted driving permit after completing five years of their revocation period.

In order to be eligible for the restricted driving permit under the new law, the applicant must demonstrate by clear and convincing evidence:

  1. That he or she has experienced a minimum of three years of uninterrupted sobriety from drugs, alcohol, or both; and
  2. That he or she has successfully completed a rehabilitative program or activity recommended by a licensed service provider.

While it is always a good legal strategy to fight a DUI charge that is pending against you so that you are not convicted of the DUI, if you ultimately are convicted, it is also important that you pursue the options available to you to get your driver’s license reinstated as soon as possible.

Under the new law, four-time DUI convictions can become eligible for an administrative hearing to request reinstatement of their driving privileges from the Illinois Secretary of State. In the alternative, these individuals can seek to obtain a restricted driving permit, which can be obtained for the purpose of transporting either yourself or a family member for certain reasons or purposes, including getting to and from work, school, substance abuse rehabilitative services or programs, for obtaining medical care and attending doctor’s appointments, or for getting children to daycare.

Call the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley

Getting a first, second, third or subsequent DUI is a matter that can not be taken lightly. Your rights and your freedom are at stake. Consult with an experienced DUI criminal defense attorney about what options are available to you and whether you can get your driving privileges reinstated sooner rather than later. Please contact a skilled Rolling Meadows DUI attorney immediately. Call the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley at (847) 394-3200 for assistance.

 

Sources:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=062500050K11-501

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/publicacts/99/099-0290.htm

Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over Campaign in Full Swing in Illinois

October 5th, 2015 at 12:34 pm

Illinois dui attorney, Illinois defense lawyer, Illinois criminal attorney,As fall arrives, Illinois law enforcement, through the partnership efforts of the Illinois Department of Transportation and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, have been actively and aggressively implementing the Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over traffic safety campaign, a campaign designed to improve awareness and crack down on drunk and drugged driving on Illinois roadways, according to one report. The central theme of the Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over campaign is that drunk driving is preventable, and as such one of the main objectives of the campaign is to raise awareness of this fact.

During the time period between August 24th and Labor Day on September 7th, Illinois law enforcement was out in force, with more officers patrolling the roadways and exercising a zero tolerance policy when it comes to drunk or drugged drivers on the road. There was also an increase in the number of traffic safety checks and officers focused on issuing tickets for seat belt law violators without exception under the Click It or Ticket campaign.

Drunk Driving Is Illegal, and a Moment of Poor Judgement Can Be Trouble

Under 625 ILCS 5/11-501, a person is considered too intoxicated to operate a motor vehicle if their blood alcohol concentration is 0.08 percent or higher. Yet many Illinois drivers still drink and drive. There are a number of reasons for this:

  • Some people are normally prudent and safe drivers, but exercise momentary poor judgement during festivities;
  • Some people do not normally drink, but have a few alcoholic beverages during a celebration with friends, and it is too much for them and it impairs their driving more than they expected; and/or
  • Some people drive themselves to a party or barbecue, have a few drinks not realizing how intoxicated they are, and do not have a designated driver to take them home afterwards.

Many people who are pulled over and charged with a DUI are first-time offenders. They are normally great drivers, but have exercised poor judgment and got caught behind the wheel when they were too impaired to drive. Sometimes they were driving because they completely believed that they were sober enough to drive. Even if you are operating your vehicle in a safe and responsible way, if you get caught and your chemical test results show that you are over the legal limit, you will face DUI charges.

It is important to fight the DUI charges that are pending against you. A DUI conviction means that you will be facing time in court, jail time, hefty fines, loss of driver’s license, alcohol and drug educational classes, and a criminal record.

Call the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley

With Illinois law enforcement so aggressively looking for drunk drivers, there will be an increase in the number of people who are charged with DUI. If you are facing DUI charges, please contact a skilled Rolling Meadows DUI attorney immediately. Call the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley at (847) 394-3200 for a consultation on your case.

 

Sources:

http://patch.com/illinois/naperville/naperville-police-ramping-efforts-nab-drunk-drivers-0

http://www.buckleupillinois.org/default.html

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=062500050K11-501

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