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Archive for the ‘Illinois criminal defense’ tag

How to Fight a Protective Order in Illinois

January 15th, 2018 at 7:40 am

domestic violence, protective order, restraining order, Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer, Illinois criminal defenseAn Illinois protective order (also commonly referred to as an “order of protection” or a “restraining order”) is a court ordered civil decree that is designed to prevent future acts of domestic violence from occurring by requiring the individual listed on the order to refrain from engaging in certain enumerated acts (for example, coming within a certain distance of the petitioner, possessing a firearm, harassing, stalking, or intimidating the petitioner, etc.).

If a protective order has been issued against you, it is critical to carefully abide by each provision listed in the order. Failing to do so can land you in a world of legal trouble. To begin, you will have likely committed a Class A misdemeanor and may be sentenced to spend up to one year in jail, and pay a fine of up to $2,500. Therefore, even if you feel that the order of protection that has been issued against you is not justified, it is critical that you abide by its terms and fight the order through the appropriate legal channels.

Fighting an IL Protective Order: The Process

Upon receiving notice that a protective order has been issued against you, there are two options at your disposal; you can either fight the order in court or not. If you choose not to go to court, then you are essentially letting the order stand—the presiding judge will decide the case based solely on evidence presented by your accuser and no one will be there to tell your side of the story.

Alternatively, you can decide to fight the protective order by responding to the court papers that you were served with and telling your side of the story in court. If you decide to take this route, then you will need to progress through the following steps:

  • Step 1 – Read Through Each Document: Start by reading through all of the paperwork that you have been served with and immediately start abiding by each provision contained in the emergency order of protection, if one has been issued against you. Be sure to follow any and all instructions contained in the paperwork that you were served with.
  • Step 2 – Go to Court: When you were served with notice that a protective order petition was filed against you the paperwork that you received indicated the time and place of your court hearing. Go to court as instructed, be sure to arrive early, dress well, and bring your lawyer with you if you have hired one. During the hearing you will have the opportunity to tell your side of the story.
  • Step 3 – Wait for the Court’s Decision: After considering all of the evidence presented the presiding judge will decide whether or not to issue an order of protection against you. The judge may make this decision during the hearing or he or she may take the matter under consideration and inform you of their decision at a later date.

Has a Protective Order Been Issued Against You? Give Us a Call!

If an Illinois protective order has been issued against you, passionate Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer Christopher Cosley is available to help. At The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley, we understand that domestic violence is an emotionally charged issue and that there are always at least two sides to every story surrounding an allegation of domestic abuse. If you are interested in fighting a protective order that has been issued against you we would be happy to evaluate the circumstances surrounding the order and discuss your legal options with you.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=072000050K12-3.4

The Ins and Outs of Claiming Self Defense in Illinois

October 2nd, 2017 at 10:24 am

claiming self defense, Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer, self defense claim, unlawful force, Illinois criminal defenseIn law and order television programs, characters seen under attack are often able to fight their attackers. In these dramatic scenes, the aggressors end up dead. Viewers are led to believe that everything will work out for the victims as they tell the authorities that they reacted in self defense, killing their attackers, and they are then able to simply return home.

While it is true that in America self defense is an affirmative defense (i.e. a defense that will negate liability even if the defendant committed the alleged acts) it should be noted that claiming self defense is actually a bit more complicated in reality. 

The Components of a Successful Self Defense Claim in Illinois

Illinois’ self defense statute contained in 720 ILCS 5/6-4 (also sometimes referred to as the use of force in defense of person statute), spells out the requirements that must be met in order for a criminal defendant to successfully argue that he or she was justified in using force to defend himself or herself.

Under this code section, a person is justified in using force against an individual who is threatening the imminent use of unlawful force if the person reasonably believes that such conduct is necessary in order to defend themselves.

However, in order for a defendant to successfully assert this defense, he or she must also be able to demonstrate that the amount of force used was proper. In other words, if the defendant used force that was intended or likely to cause great bodily harm or death, then he or she must be able to demonstrate that such force was reasonably necessary to prevent himself or herself from great bodily harm or death.

In summary, you can only successfully claim that you acted in self defense in Illinois if your belief that you were in danger of an imminent unlawful force was reasonable and if the amount of force that you used to defend yourself did not exceed the level of force threatened.

Defense of Another

It should be noted that Illinois’ use of force in defense of person statute also provides an affirmative defense for a criminal defendant who used proportionate force against an aggressor if he or she reasonably believed that such conduct was necessary in order to defend another against the imminent threat of an unlawful force. This means that you are justified in using force to defend someone else from an imminent unlawful threat of force as long as you reasonably believe that your conduct is necessary to defend against the attack and you do not use force that exceeds the level of force threatened.

Have You Been Accused of Committing a Crime? Contact a Local Criminal Defense Lawyer

If you have been accused of committing a crime and are searching for an experienced Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer, contact The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley. Our well respected firm defends clients throughout the greater Chicago area against a wide variety of criminal charges and would be happy to assist you.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs4.asp?ActID=1876&ChapterID=53&SeqStart=8200000&SeqEnd=9700000

Burglary: The Elements of the Offense in Illinois

September 13th, 2017 at 7:18 am

breaking and entering, burglary, burglary crime, Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer, Illinois criminal defenseBurglary is generally defined as the breaking and entering into the house of another for an unlawful purpose. However, it is important to note that burglary is one of those crimes that is defined slightly differently in each state.

In Illinois, breaking in is not a required element of burglary and there are several different listed entities beyond homes and structures that can be burgled. 

Illinois Statutes Section 19-1: Burglary

According to section 19-1 of the Illinois Statutes, an individual commits the crime of burglary when, without the authority to do so, he or she knowingly enters or remains within a building, watercraft, house trailer, aircraft, railroad car, motor vehicle, or any part thereof, while intending to commit theft or a felony therein. This statute can be broken down into the following key elements:

  • Knowingly Entering or Remaining: Some people mistakenly believe that an offender must physically break something to gain access (for example, a window) in order to commit the crime of burglary. However, in Illinois this is not the case. No physical breaking in is necessary. Instead, the offender must only knowingly enter or remain without the authority to do so. For example, if a teenager intentionally remains in a department store after closing, a court would likely find that he or she knowingly remained in a building without the authority to do so and has therefore fulfilled the knowingly enters or remains requirement of burglary.
  • Intending to Commit Theft or a Felony: This element of burglary is often the most difficult for the prosecution to prove as it speaks to the intent of the offender. In order to satisfy this element, the offender must have entered (or remained) in the building (or watercraft, house trailer, aircraft, etc.) while intending to commit theft or a felony while inside. For instance, if the teenager from the example above remained in the department store with the intent to steal merchandise, then a court would likely find that this second element of burglary has been satisfied.

But how can the prosecution prove that an alleged offender intended to commit theft or a felony? How can anyone know what was in the alleged offender’s mind at the time? For example, how do we know that the teenager intended to steal merchandise and was not just looking for a safe place to spend the night?

Proving criminal intent can be tricky but is generally established via either a confession or circumstantial evidence.

Reach Out to Us For Help

If you have been charged with burglary in Illinois, then the prosecution will need to prove each element discussed above in order to convict you. Therefore, it is critical that you retain an experienced Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer who is prepared to aggressively and skillfully defend you against each allegation put forth by the prosecution. Attorney Christopher Cosley, the sole attorney at the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley, is just such an attorney and would be happy to discuss your legal options with you.

Source:

http://ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=072000050K19-1

The Three Types of Protective Orders Available in Illinois

July 17th, 2017 at 12:13 pm

protective orders, Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer, Illinois criminal defense, Illinois protective order, protective order violationIn Illinois, there are three different types of protective orders (also referred to as restraining orders); emergency protective orders, interim protective orders, and plenary protective orders. If a protective order has been filed against you it is important that you understand which type of order you are facing so that you can take the necessary steps to protect your legal rights. Read on to learn about the three types of protective orders available in Illinois and then contact a local order of protection criminal defense lawyer to discuss your legal options.

Emergency Protective Orders

An emergency protective order offers short-term protection to the accuser and can be issued solely based on his or her testimony. Furthermore, under some circumstances an emergency protective order can be issued ex parte, i.e. against you without prior notice. Emergency protective orders are temporary in nature and are designed to be in effect until a full hearing for a more long-term protective order can be held (this usually takes place within 14-21 days).

Interim Protective Orders

In some cases it takes awhile before a full restraining order hearing can be held. When this happens, the court may issue an interim protective order to be in effect from the date on which the accuser’s emergency protective order expires until the full court hearing takes place. Interim protective orders can be in effect for up to 30 days. However, an interim protective order can only be issued against you in Illinois if you have had a chance to make an initial appearance in court and have been properly notified of the date on which your full restraining order hearing will take place.

Plenary Protective Orders

Plenary protective orders are unique because unlike the other types of protective orders that are available in Illinois plenary orders offer long-term protection. Plenary protective orders may last up to two years and, under 750 ILCS 60/220(e), may be renewed an unlimited number of times. However, a court will not issue a plenary protective order until after holding a hearing in which both the accuser and the accused have had a chance to present their cases.

A Protective Order Has Been Filed Against Me, What Should I Do Now?

The circumstances surrounding each protective order are different, so the best thing that you can do is consult with a local criminal defense attorney about the specifics of your case. However, it is generally also advisable to avoid all contact with your accuser (this includes calling or texting them!), attend every hearing that has been scheduled, and fully comply with every provision of the order against you.

Reach Out to Us for Assistance

If you need help opposing an Illinois protective order, or defending yourself against an alleged protective order violation, the experienced Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyers of The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley are here to help. Our firm is located in Rolling Meadows but we are dedicated to defending adults and juveniles throughout the greater Chicago area.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=075000600K220

Accused of Burglarizing a Store? Get a Criminal Defense Lawyer

May 3rd, 2017 at 8:10 am

burglarizing a store, Rolling Meadows Criminal Defense LawyerBurglary in Illinois involves someone knowingly entering a building without permission, and with the intent to commit a theft or a felony. One of the most common targets for acts of burglary are stores and shops.

From large retailers to small mom-and-pop type stores, virtually any type of store can be the target of a burglary or an attempted burglary. The main reason why a person commits a burglary of a store is usually to steal some piece of merchandise or to steal money. But what is interesting about the crime of burglary is that a burglar does not actually have to steal anything in order to commit the crime. Simply breaking into the store with the intent to steal something is enough to warrant a conviction for burglary.

Burglary is a Different Charge Than Theft or Shoplifting

Burglary is often charged when a person breaks into a store with the intent to steal something when the store is normally closed. Burglary could also be charged if a person remains in an open store after being asked to leave, or remains in a store in an off-limits area—in either case while having the intent to steal or commit a felony. Still, burglary is a different offense than theft or shoplifting.  

As a general rule, someone who is charged with burglary is not also charged with shoplifting, even if the person steals something during the burglary. Rather, he or she may be charged with burglary and theft, but each situation is unique and the exact charges will depend on the circumstances of the offense.

Shoplifting, on the other hand, is charged when someone steals merchandise from a store, alters the price of the item, or attempts to buy an item for less than its ticket price due to some sort of trickery (e.g., price tag swapping, or trying to trick the self-checkout scanner at the store). Shoplifting is usually associated with theft that occurs during normal business hours of the store’s operation.

Why You Need to Fight Your Criminal Charges

Whether you are facing burglary, theft, of shoplifting charges, it is important that you fight your criminal charges. If you are convicted of burglary, it is a Class 2 felony. If you are convicted of theft, it can be either a misdemeanor or a felony level offense. Similarly, depending on the circumstances surrounding the shoplifting, you could be convicted of a misdemeanor or a felony level offense.

A conviction will leave you with a criminal record, which can follow you around for many years, making it difficult to get some forms of employment or to rent an apartment. Hiring a criminal defense lawyer to fight for you will give you your best chance of defending yourself against the charges.

If you did commit the crime, then it is important to try and get the charges reduced, or dropped, and you will want to have a lawyer on your side to make sure that you receive fair treatment under the law.

Contact an Experienced Criminal Defense Lawyer

Burglary, theft, and shoplifting charges are nothing to be taken lightly. You need the help of an experienced and talented criminal defense lawyer with years of experience to fight the charges that are pending against you. Contact a passionate Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney at our office for assistance with your case.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs4.asp?ActID=1876&ChapterID=53&SeqStart=62600000&SeqEnd=63400000

When Juveniles Commit a Theft That Turns Into Residential Burglary

April 28th, 2017 at 1:42 pm

residential burglary, Rolling Meadows Juvenile Crime LawyerAs the weather begins to warm up, many homeowners in the area will open their doors and garages to allow the sunshine in and to air out their homes after a long, cold winter. In suburbia, it is not uncommon for people to leave their garage doors open during the daytime, and to even leave them open without supervision.

While normally such behavior should be safe, open doors can be inviting, especially to juveniles. Take, for example, a group of teenagers who see an open and apparently unguarded garage and enter in search for beer. One teen in the group might dare another to go steal the beer or something else from the open garage. Under pressure from his or her friends, the unfortunate teen will enter the garage and commit the theft.

When Theft Turns Into Residential Burglary

The teen who steals the beer from the garage, however, has done more than merely commit a theft. Because the teen entered the garage of another without permission, and with the intent to steal the beer, the criminal charges the teen can face will likely be upgraded to residential burglary. Why is the upcharge so bad for a teen? Residential burglary is a felony level offense, even if the offender is only a juvenile.

While someone who is under 18 years of age will likely face juvenile charges for his or her theft of the beer from someone’s garage, it is still a serious matter. When it comes to juveniles who commit offenses, the courts have a lot of discretion in terms of how the juvenile offender should be punished. The potential punishments that a convicted juvenile delinquent could face include:

  • Having to pay a fine;
  • Having to pay restitutions to the victim of the residential burglary;
  • Having to attend mandatory counseling sessions or therapy sessions;
  • Being put on probation, which means that the juvenile avoids detention (the juvenile equivalent of jail), but is required to comply with a number of terms, i.e., rules, that are part of his or her probation;
  • Being placed in juvenile detention, weekend detentions, or mandatory community service-type work programs.

Juveniles sometimes make poor decisions and exercise bad judgement. They also can make mistakes about the criminality of the things they do. First time juvenile delinquents are often treated with more leniency by the court than repeat offenders. Any young person facing theft of burglary charges needs to consult with a juvenile offenses lawyer immediately.

Juvenile Delinquents Need an Experienced Criminal Defense Lawyer

A juvenile charged with a crime needs a strong criminal defense lawyer fighting for his or her rights. Contact an experienced Rolling Meadows juvenile crime lawyer for assistance with your case.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=072000050K19-3

Getting Caught With Drug Paraphernalia in Illinois

February 25th, 2016 at 7:50 am

drug paraphernalia, Rolling Meadows Drug Crimes AttorneyIt is all too common for criminal defendants to be arrested because they are in possession of drug paraphernalia. Even if you have absolutely no drugs on you at the time the arrest is made, law enforcement can still bust you for having the tools necessary to use drugs under 720 ILCS 600, also referred to as the Illinois Drug Paraphernalia Act. When a person knowingly has the drug paraphernalia in their possession, it is difficult to refute the charges.

Drug Paraphernalia That Can Get You Arrested in Illinois

There are several types of drug paraphernalia that can get you into trouble with law enforcement. A few common examples include:

  • Marijuana bongs and pipes;
  • Crack pipes;
  • Syringes, when the person in possession of the syringes lacks a medical condition that would justify him or her having syringes;
  • Cocaine spoons or cocaine vials;
  • Lab equipment for use in manufacturing methamphetamines;
  • Drug baggies or balloons;
  • Measuring scales; and
  • Roach clips.
  • However, Illinois drug paraphernalia law also cover the equipment, chemicals and tools required to cultivate, or grow marijuana as well.

Regardless of the type of drug paraphernalia that is found in your possession, all drug paraphernalia charges are treated the same. A person who is found with a bong in his or her possession is treated just the same as a person who is found with a cocaine vial in his or her possession, or someone who is found with heroin needles.

But What About Headshops? They Sell Bongs

There are countless shops and stores that legally sell smoking apparati to customers. These establishments are permitted to sell these pipes and devices because these devices can also be used to smoke legal substances. In order to be charged under the Illinois Drug Paraphernalia Act, the drug paraphernalia must be sold or in your possession with the intent to use the paraphernalia to use illegal drugs.

What Are Some Defenses to Drug Paraphernalia Charges?

There are a number of defenses that can be raised against drug paraphernalia charges, and which ones are applicable depend on the specific circumstances a criminal defendant is facing. For instance:

  • Someone who has a medical reason to be in possession of hypodermic needles may lack the intent to use the needles to do illegal drugs;
  • Someone who does not know that the drug paraphernalia is in his or her possession might have a defense against the charges; and
  • If the drug paraphernalia was found during a search, was the search conducted by law enforcement proper? Was a warrant necessary? Did the law enforcement have one? Was there reasonable suspicion to conduct a search?

Reach Out to Us for Assistance

Possession of drug paraphernalia is a serious criminal charge, and an experienced criminal defense lawyer will be able to help you identify your legal options and can help prepare your strongest possible defense. Please do not hesitate to contact a Rolling Meadows drug crimes attorney immediately at the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley. We are happy to help you today.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs3.asp?ActID=1947&ChapterID=53

Mentally Ill Arrested Instead of Treated

May 12th, 2014 at 7:00 am

Chicago criminal defense attorney, Crisis Intervention Team, mentally ill, mentally ill arrested, severe mental illness, Urbana police department, Illinois criminal defense, social workers in Illinois, Cook County criminal defense lawyerIt seems that so many of the tragic news stories involving shootings at schools, military bases, and other public arenas often trace back to a perpetrator with a history of some degree of mental illness. Not every person who suffers from a mental disease commits such horrific acts. Likewise, some of those who are diagnosed as mentally ill participate in lesser acts of criminality. However, situations like these beg the question, “How can we more appropriately and properly treat the mentally ill to avoid criminal acts?”

A recent article says there is a sharp incline in the number of mentally ill people who are charged with a crime or otherwise dealt with by law enforcement in situations that would call for social workers or other community resources. This suggests that the answer to the question posed is more pressing that one might think.

Lack of Resources

Across the state of Illinois, the resources that are available to the mentally ill on a community level are on the decline. As a result, much of the burden is shifted to law enforcement, forcing officers into roles they are not necessarily prepared to handle. The numbers speak for themselves. In Urbana, the number of documented police calls regarding those with mental or behavioral problems has tripled in the last two years. This statistic does not take undocumented encounters into account.

Despite the obvious need, the options officers have in dealing with such calls are decreasing in large part due to funding issues. This is causing mental health facilities to close, and community-based resources to be limited. The result is a gap in the system that forces police officers to act as social workers.

Solutions

Urbana’s city council held a session focused on discussing the gaps in the system and providing an overview of the city’s Crisis Intervention Team. The problem was further discussed, with officials stating that of the approximate half a million people in Illinois suffering with a severe mental illness, only about 19 percent of them were provided with services.

While a more permanent and effective solution remains to be implemented, the Urbana police department has trained about 20 of its officers to deal with calls that involve psychological issues as opposed to criminal issues when a crisis intervention officer is not available. Some would like to see that number grow, which would likely go a long way in avoiding a situation where a mentally ill individual is arrested in a situation which would not otherwise call for such action.

Others argue that the training, despite being a step in the right direction, falls significantly shy of solving the problem. Besides the discussion the council meeting started, the point of the meeting was also to highlight the lack of resources and support available to help those with psychological issues. Not only does the lack of funding pose obvious problems for those who suffer from mental illness, but it also poses problems for officers who are forced to deal with the individuals as the result of a call. In those situations, the officer can bring the person to a hospital, bring them to jail, or choose not to act.

Often none of these options are ideal, and legal issues in some cases may prevent a hospital from admitting a person against his or her will. Likewise, incarceration is generally only a short-term solution, since those who are mentally ill will likely engage in the same conduct upon their release in the absence of proper treatment.

Criminal Defense Attorney

Hiring an experienced attorney is highly beneficial to every individual charged with a crime, but especially to those who may have engaged in criminal behavior or been arrested due to mental illness. An attorney can not only protect your rights, but may be able to ensure you are treated appropriately in light of your mental condition. Contact the attorneys at the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley in Rolling Meadows today for a consultation.

Zero Tolerance in Illinois

April 10th, 2014 at 12:34 pm

zero tolerance, DUI, driving under the influence, Chicago criminal defense lawyer, DUI defense attorney in IllinoisAccording to United States law, no person under the age of 21 is allowed to consume alcohol and no person of any age is allowed to drive while intoxicated. Many times, adults will have a couple drinks and drive home safely, with a blood alcohol content below the legal level of 0.08. If a person under 21, however, is pulled over and is found to have a blood alcohol content of anything above 0.0, he or she can be charged.

This is called the zero tolerance policy of Illinois for underage drinking, says  CyberDriveIllinois.com. If a person under 21 is caught driving with even a trace of alcohol in his or her system, he or she will lose all driving privileges. Police officers can only pull over a person if he or she has probable cause.

Probable causes can include:

  • Driving over the speed limit;
  • Running a red/yellow light;
  • Not coming to a complete stop at a stop sign or four-way stop;
  • Not driving straight in the traffic lane.

The zero tolerance law says:

  • No person under the age of 21 can purchase, accept, possess, or consume alcohol. Penalties may be suspension/revocation of driving privileges;
  • Any person under 21 who receives court supervision as penalty will receive 3-month suspension of driving privileges;
  • Certain exemptions include religious and medical reasons;
  • All states have zero tolerance laws;
  • Other penalties may be fines, jail time, high insurance costs, mandatory alcohol evaluation and treatment, negative effects on driving record, and negative effects on job opportunities.

If you are caught with alcohol in your system while driving and you are under 21, your driving privileges will be suspended for 3 months. The suspension will be lengthened to one year for a second offense.

Although you can refuse to take a test to determine your blood alcohol level, you can be charged for refusal or failure to complete the test if you are under 21. The first time you refuse, your driving privileges will be suspended for 6 months and as a second offense, they will be suspended for 2 years.

Keep your driving record clean by not drinking and driving. If you have been caught drinking and driving, especially if you are under the age of 21, contact an Illinois criminal attorney to help you in court today.

Date Rape is Still Rape

November 29th, 2013 at 4:00 pm

Many people believe that date rape is not as serious as other kinds of rape.  However, the only reason for the differentiation between the two terms is to specify the status of the involved parties.  For example, the term “rape” generally happens between two strangers, while “date rape” or “acquaintance rape” happens between two people who previously knew each other on some level.  Date rape can happen on a date, between two friends, between two people in a relationship, or between members of a former couple.  Furthermore, because date rape regularly occurs after a date or a party, the term often indicates that alcohol or drugs played a role in the conduct.

Date Rape is Still RapeSome offenders believe that accusations of date rape are not as serious as other types of rape charges, and that they will face less severe consequences if they force sex with someone they already know.  This belief is mistaken, as Illinois law does not differentiate between types of rape.  Prosecutors charge any rape act, regardless of the status of the parties, under 720 ILCS 5/11-1.20 for criminal sexual assault or 720 ILCS 5/11-1.30 for aggravated criminal sexual assault.

What constitutes criminal sexual assault?

The charge of criminal sexual assault is a Class 1 Felony and applies to anyone who allegedly commits an act of sexual penetration by using force or the threat of force.  The charge also applies to sex when the accused knew the victim would be unable to give knowing consent or is unable to understand the nature of the sexual act.  Therefore, this statute applies directly to many date rape situations in which the accuser claims to have been under the influence of alcohol or drugs and therefore was unable to protest.

A charge may be escalated to aggravated criminal sexual assault, a Class X Felony, under certain circumstances such as the accused used any time of weapon or caused any bodily harm to the victim.  It is not uncommon for some harm to occur in forceful date rape situations, so this charge is not reserved for stranger rape.

If convicted of criminal sexual assault, you may face mandatory prison time of four to fifteen years or six to thirty years for an aggravated charge.  Additionally, you will have to register with the Illinois Sex Offender Database, where information such as your name, address, and criminal conduct will be publicly available.  Therefore, date rape can result in very severe penalties that may affect your freedom, future employability, and life in general.

What should I do if I have been accused of date rape?

If you have been arrested or charged with any type of sexual assault, it is highly important that you contact an experienced Illinois criminal attorney as soon as possible.  Do not hesitate to contact the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley today.

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