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Archive for the ‘drug charges’ tag

When Is it Illegal to Possess Prescription Drugs in Rolling Meadows?

October 10th, 2019 at 10:08 am

criminal drug charges, prescription drugs, Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney, prescription drug charges, prescription drug useWhen most people think of criminal drug charges, they often think of those relating to hard street drugs, such as cocaine, meth, and heroin. However, did you know that even if you have a prescription for a drug, you could still face criminal charges under certain circumstances?

In Illinois, there are many offenses associated with prescription drugs, and many residents are not aware of that fact. For this reason, too many people are charged by overzealous law enforcement. When they are, they often do not know what to do. The first step to take is to speak to a Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney.

Illinois Law on Prescription Drugs

Under the Illinois Compiled Statutes, there are certain offenses related to prescription drugs that have serious consequences. The statutes stipulate that it is against the law to manufacture, distribute, or possess controlled substances, including prescription drugs. The most common of these drugs fall within Schedules 2 and 4 and include:

  • Hydrocodone
  • OxyContin
  • Ritalin
  • Adderall
  • Morphine
  • Valium
  • Vicodin
  • Xanax
  • Darvocet
  • Demerol

When a person is found guilty of any offense relating to these, or any other controlled substances, they face harsh penalties. However, many of those accused do not understand why they were charged.

Types of Illinois Prescription Drug Crimes

Even the smallest act could result in a charge for a prescription drug crime. These most often include:

  • Unauthorized possession: When a person is found in possession of any prescription drug that was not prescribed to them, they could face up to 30 years in prison. This is true even if the person in possession of the drug never used it. For example, two friends are out and one asks the other to hold their prescription drugs in a backpack or purse. The person the prescription is for goes home, forgetting to take their medication with them. Under the law, the person still holding it could be charged with a crime.
  • Sharing: While everyone wants to help their loved ones feel better, sharing even one pill, even when a person suffers from the same condition, could result in criminal charges.
  • Recreational distribution: When a person uses a prescription drug for anything other than treatment of an illness, it is a crime. It is also a crime for doctors to prescribe drugs that are not intended for medical use, or that are in greater quantities than what a person needs.
  • Misrepresentation: When a patient lies to a doctor or misrepresents facts in order to gain a prescription, they may be charged with a crime.

Regardless of the crime a person is accused of, they face serious consequences if they are convicted.

Penalties for Prescription Drug Crimes

The penalties for prescription drug crimes, no matter the alleged offense, are always severe. The prosecution will lay charges ranging from a Class 4 felony to a Class X felony. The sentences for Class 4 felonies range from one to three years in state prison. For those convicted of a Class X felony, the penalties are even worse and can include six to thirty years in state prison.

Additionally, there are also certain circumstances that may enhance these penalties. For example, if a person is found in possession of an illegal prescription drug, and a firearm, a judge may double their sentence.

To avoid these penalties, it is imperative that anyone facing charges speaks to a Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney that can help.

Call Our Illinois Criminal Defense Lawyer Today

After being charged with a prescription drug offense, those accused are often confused and feel hopeless. The situation may not be as dire as it seems, though. At the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley, our dedicated Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney can help. We will scour the law and apply it to the facts of your case to create a solid defense that will give you the best chance of a positive outcome. Call us today at 847-394-3200 for your free consultation to learn more about how we can help with your case.

 

Sources:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=073000050K5-4.5-25

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs5.asp?ActID=1941&ChapterID=53

What Are the Penalties for Heroin Possession in Illinois?

May 16th, 2019 at 4:49 pm

Illinois defense attorneyA Du Quoin man was found in possession of a small amount of heroin in early April. That was a violation of his parole and he was sent back to the Illinois Department of Corrections to serve out the rest of his sentence on previous charges.

Heroin possession is considered one of the most serious drug crimes in Illinois. Those convicted will have a criminal record for the rest of their life and could face several years in prison, as well as extremely high fines. While the penalties for heroin possession are extremely harsh within the state, a criminal defense lawyer can help those charged and give them the best chance of a successful outcome in court.

Illinois Law on Heroin

Heroin is classified as a Schedule 1 drug on the Illinois Controlled Substances Act and is illegal for anyone to possess, manufacture, or distribute. The specific classification of being on Schedule 1 means that heroin is considered a “hard” drug. In the eyes of the law, this is the most serious designation and as such, law enforcement and the prosecution pursue these cases aggressively.

Narcotics listed within the Schedule I are believed to have a high potential for abuse. They have no accepted medical benefits or uses, and there is no protocol that allows someone to use the drug safely, even under medical supervision. Due to this very strict classification, those charged with heroin possession face very serious penalties.

Penalties for Heroin Possession

All heroin possession charges in Illinois are considered felonies. This means they have some of the harshest penalties for those convicted. However, the actual sentence will depend on the amount of heroin a person had at the time of arrest. The amounts and associated penalties for heroin possession are:

  • 15 to 100 grams: 4 to 15 years in state prison, or a maximum fine of $200,000, or both.
  • 100 to 400 grams: 6 to 30 years in state prison, and/or a maximum fine of $200,000 or the street value of the drug.
  • 400 to 900 grams: 8 to 40 years in state prison, and/or a maximum fine of $200,000 or the street value of the drug.
  • 900 grams and over: 10 to 50 years in state prison, and/or a maximum fine of $200,000 or the street value of the drug.

In certain circumstances, these penalties are increased. For example, those caught in possession of heroin with 1,000 feet of a school, park, movie theater, or church can have their sentences doubled. This is also true for those found in possession of heroin and a firearm.

The penalties for heroin possession are certainly some of the harshest of all Illinois drug crimes. Those facing charges need the help of an attorney that can build a solid defense for their case.

Call Our Rolling Meadows Drug Crime Attorney Today

If you are facing heroin possession charges, or have been accused of any other drug crime, call a skilled Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney at the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley at 847-394-3200. We can represent you if you are questioned by the police and challenge searches of your vehicle or home, all to create a strong defense for your case. Learn more about how we can help by calling or filling out our online form for your free case evaluation today.

 

Source:

https://thesouthern.com/news/local/crime-and-courts/du-quoin-man-gets-prison-time-for-possessing-heroin/article_4f926a6e-312c-5974-992d-8407edb1d927.html

When Is Meth Possession a Felony in Illinois?

April 11th, 2019 at 8:27 pm

Illinois drug crimes lawyer, Illinois defense lawyerThe drug laws in Rolling Meadows and throughout Illinois are often confusing, and the line between a misdemeanor drug charge and a felony charge can become blurred. Most of the time, the charge that is laid depends on the scenario surrounding the alleged crime.

There are instances though, in which a drug crime is automatically a felony. Typically a harsher charge is laid when there are large volumes of a controlled substance involved, or when the crime includes certain substances. LSD, cocaine, and heroin are a few drugs that automatically make a crime a felony. Methamphetamine, or meth, is another.

Methamphetamine Laws in Rolling Meadows

According to 720 ILCS 646/60 of the Illinois statutes, meth crimes are always charged as a felony. This means that even when a person is caught with the smallest amount on them, and they did not intend to distribute the drug, they will face felony charges.

The law imposes such strict charges and penalties on those caught with meth because it is a very dangerous drug. It is incredibly addictive and exposes those that use it to toxic chemicals. Manufacturing the drug is also particularly dangerous, which is why the law also outlines severe penalties for anyone that does.

Methamphetamine Possession Felony Charges

The crime of meth possession is the most minor meth crime of all in Illinois. These are still treated as felonies. Individuals charged with meth possession face a number of possible charges, depending on the amount they were carrying at the time of arrest.

  • Class 3 felony for any amount under five grams;
  • Class 2 felony for any amount of at least 5 grams, but under 15 grams;
  • Class 1 felony for any amount of at least 15 grams, but under 100 grams; and
  • Class X felony for any amount over 100 grams.

When charged with a Class X felony, the penalties will increase even more if the amount was over 400 grams, and then again on any amount over 900 grams.

Penalties for Methamphetamine Possession in Rolling Meadows

With meth possession being the most minor of all meth crimes, it makes sense that these also carry the lightest sentences. However, anyone charged with a meth crime in Rolling Meadows must understand these sentences are still very severe.

A Class 3 felony offense, the least severe of them all, still has a potential sentence of two to five years in jail. A Class 1 felony offense carries a much longer prison sentence of 15 to 30 years in jail. Class X felonies, although rarely charged in meth crime cases, can send someone to prison for several decades if they are convicted.

Been Charged with Meth Possession? Call a Rolling Meadows Drug Crime Lawyer

Being charged with meth possession, or any other meth crime, is very scary. Those accused begin to worry about their future and what it may hold for them. A skilled Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer can help ensure that future is a little brighter. If you have been charged with a meth crime, contact the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley at 847-394-3200. We know how serious the charges are that you are up against, and we will build a strong defense against them. Do not wait for representation when you can call and get a free consultation right now.

 

Sources:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=072006460K60

https://www.iwu.edu/counseling/Illinois_Drug_Laws.htm

What Is 410 Probation in Illinois?

January 15th, 2019 at 10:07 pm

IL defense lawyerAccording to the Illinois Controlled Substances Act, a person arrested for possession of certain illegal drugs in the state may face felony charges. This is true even if it is their first offense. However, in Illinois, some defendants may be eligible for 410 Probation. This can allow those facing possession charges to avoid jail time. Few are aware though, of how 410 Probation works in Illinois.

Felony Possession Charges in Illinois

Not every possession charge will be considered a felony in Illinois. In order to be facing felony charges, a person must have been in possession of:

  • 15 grams or more of LSD, morphine, heroin, or cocaine;
  • 30 grams of more of pentazocine, ketamine, or methaqualone; or
  • 200 grams or more of amphetamines, peyote, or barbituric acid.

The most minor of these charges can result in a Class 1 felony charge. If convicted, an individual may face four4 to 15 years in prison and up to $25,000 in fines. However, individuals that are facing a first offense for felony drug charges may be eligible for 410 Probation.

410 Probation

In order to be eligible for 410 Probation, individuals must meet certain requirements. One of these is that the individual cannot have any previous drug charges, including those involving cannabis. They also could not have been placed on probation in the past.

In order to accept the probation, individuals must plead guilty to the drug charge. After the guilty plea is accepted, a judge will place the individual on probation instead of entering a judgment.

While on probation, the individual will have a number of conditions that must be met. These include:

  • No weapon possession while on probation;
  • No criminal violations;
  • Random drug testing;
  • 30 hours of community service;
  • Possible fines;
  • Possible rehabilitation; and
  • Continued court appearances throughout the probation time.

Once the probation has been completed successfully and the individual has met all the conditions, the court will then dismiss the charge.

The biggest benefit of 410 Probation is that it allows individuals to avoid prison time. Due to the charge being dismissed from their record after probation is completed, the charge will also be cleared from the individual’s public record.

If a background check is done by future employers or landlords, the record will show that the individual was charged with a felony drug charge, but that the charges were dismissed. After five years, individuals that have successfully completed 410 Probation can petition the court to have their record sealed.

Contact a Rolling Meadows Criminal Defense Lawyer that Can Help

While 410 Probation has many advantages for those facing first-time felony drug charges, the program also has some drawbacks. For example, if an individual violates the conditions of their probation, they will not be able to contest the charge in court because they have already pled guilty. In addition, if the court determines the individual has a significant drug problem, they may also deny the possibility of probation.

If you have been charged with a felony drug charge, contact a skilled Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer that can help. We can review your case and determine whether or not 410 Probation is a possibility, and if it is in the best interest of the accused individual. Call us today at 847-394-3200 for your free consultation.

 

Sources:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs4.asp?ActID=1941&ChapterID=53&SeqStart=5200000&SeqEnd=7900000

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=072005700K410

Understanding the Consequences of Prescription Forgery in Illinois

September 25th, 2018 at 1:21 pm

Cook County drug charges defense lawyerPrescription drug abuse is on the rise, and police and prosecutors are becoming increasingly vigilant about cracking down on those who they believe are breaking the law by using falsified prescriptions to obtain controlled substances. Because of the opioid epidemic, which has resulted from over-prescribed pain medications pushed by pharmaceutical companies and physicians, hundreds of thousands of Americans are looking for any means to get their hands on narcotics. Obtaining opioids by falsifying a prescription may seem safer than buying drugs on the street, but make no mistake—prescription forgery is a serious crime in Illinois.

What Illinois Law States About Prescription Forgery

According to 720 ILCS 570/406.2, a person commits prescription forgery (known as “unauthorized possession of prescription form”) if they have altered a prescription, possessed a form not issued by a licensed practitioner, possessed a blank prescription form without authorization, or possessed a counterfeit prescription form. Examples of prescription drug forgery include the following:

  • Changing the dose amount on a prescription written by a doctor.
    Stealing a prescription pad off a doctor’s desk.
    Writing a prescription for yourself.
    Using a computer to create a fraudulent prescription form.

The Consequences of Prescription Forgery

Shockingly, even a first time prescription forgery offender can be fined up to $100,000, and they may be sentenced to between one and three years in prison. If a person is charged with their second prescription forgery offense, they may be fined up to $200,000 and sentenced to between two and five years in prison.

It is common for a person who is charged with prescription forgery to be facing other drug charges at the same time, such as burglary, possession of an illegal drug, or an intent to traffic drugs. All of these offenses can add up to considerable time behind bars and fines that would be impossible to pay back in a lifetime of full-time work—something that would become extremely difficult to accomplish with a felony record.

Defending Medical Professionals

Medical professionals are not immune to prescription forgery charges. Doctors have been known to use their license as an opportunity to write friends or family members a prescription without reason, or to prescribe opioids to addicted patients who pay them cash under the table. If you are a physician or pharmacist, you will lose your professional license in a heartbeat if you are found guilty of prescription forgery.

A Cook County Drug Crimes Defense Attorney Can Help

More than 115 Americans die every day from overdosing on opioids, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Instead of taking steps to combat addiction and help self-medicated individuals overcome or manage their mental or physical ailments, our criminal justice system sends its best prosecutors to lock up victims of opioid addiction. If you have been charged with prescription forgery, you need a strong defense that will help you avoid the consequences of a conviction. Contact dedicated Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer Christopher M. Cosley today at 847-394-3200 to schedule a free consultation.

Sources:
https://www.drugabuse.gov/drugs-abuse/opioids/opioid-overdose-crisis
http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=072005700K406.2

Man Charged After Being Found With 75 Pounds of Marijuana

August 20th, 2018 at 3:31 pm

marijuana, criminal drug charges, drug charges, drug crimes, felony drug charges, Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorneyA man in Cook County is facing felony drug charges after being found with more than 75 pounds of marijuana, according to NBC Chicago. The Chicago Police department was responding to reports that there was a burglary in progress.

While investigating the premises of the alleged burglary, the police found a basement door that bore signs of forced entry. The officers proceeded inside the door and found 34,000 grams of marijuana. More than 120 grams of cannabis oil was also discovered.

The man who was renting the building where the marijuana and cannabis oil was found is now facing two felony charges. He has been charged with two felony counts of manufacturing or delivering over 5,000 grams of marijuana, or cannabis. In addition to these two felony charges, he also faces a misdemeanor charge as a result of being found to be allegedly violating the concealed carry act.

Felony Drug Charges in Illinois

The words felony and misdemeanor are often thrown around, but not everyone always knows the difference between these two types of charges. A felony charge is a more serious charge that carries harsher and stricter penalties. The classification of a drug charge in Illinois is based on the amount of drugs in possession and the specific intent of the person in possession of the drugs.

There are several different types of drug charges that an individual can be charged with, both felony and misdemeanor. The different types of drug charges in Illinois include:

  • Drug possession;
  • Possession of drugs with the intent to distribute;
  • Drug manufacturing;
  • Drug trafficking; and
  • Drug conspiracy.

The above list of drug crimes encompasses most, if not all, of the various types of crimes an individual might find themselves facing. These crimes, depending on the amount of drugs in a person’s possession or the circumstances surrounding the offense can lead to harsh punishments. Typically, there are fines, court costs, jail time, prison time, probation, or parole assigned to those who have been convicted of a drug crime.

Contact Us Today for Help

The charge and potential conviction of a crime can have a major impact on your life. You could lose your job, home, be unable to rent an apartment, or even be unable to find another job all because of a criminal conviction. Do not let one charge derail your entire life.

Dedicated Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney Christopher M. Cosley is ready to defend you in criminal drug charges. Attorney Cosley knows that a conviction can drastically alter one’s life and will work diligently to get the best outcome under the circumstances. Contact us today for a consultation.

Source:

https://www.nbcchicago.com/news/local/man-charged-after-cops-find-over-75-pounds-of-pot-488882181.html

When Do Drug Charges Become a Federal Offense?

August 3rd, 2018 at 3:50 pm

drug charges, federal drug charge, federal offense, Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorneys, state drug chargeBoth federal and state laws and regulations govern the use, possession, distributing, and manufacturing of drugs. Illinois has a set of drug laws, but so does the federal government. There is a big difference between being charged with a state drug charge and a federal drug charge. Therefore, it is important to know when a drug charge could become a federal charge. Each case is unique and has its own circumstances and issues, but there are different factors at play that could elevate a state drug charge to a federal one.

Factors to Consider

The following describes a number of factors to consider that may affect a drug charge:

  • The arresting officer – One of the biggest clues involves who is making the arrest. Being arrested by a federal agent is a huge sign that you will be charged with a federal crime. Sometimes local law enforcement, or state police, will ask federal agents to aid in their case. Often, state and federal officers will work together to conduct a sting to catch criminals.
  • Where the crime occurred – Crimes that occur on federal land could result in a federal drug charge. One such example is a crime occurring in a national park.
  • Statements offered by informants – In some drug cases, there is someone who is already being investigated by the federal government. These individuals often become informants for the government and will trade names and information about crimes of others for a reduced sentence or immunity. An informant working on behalf of the federal government will likely result in a federal drug charge.
  • Severity of the drug charge or offense – States often prosecute the smaller drug crimes, while the federal government prosecutes drug crimes that happen on a larger scale.

Why This Matters

One of the biggest differences between federal and state drug crimes are the penalties associated with them. Federal charges that result in a conviction carry longer sentences than state crimes. There are longer federal mandatory sentencing guidelines than the sentencing guidelines at the state level. Additionally, federal drug crimes do not have a parole program and probation is rarely granted.

If there is any doubt as to what type of drug charge is at issue, state and local authorities will discuss the issue and come to a determination as to who is better suited to prosecute the case.

We Can Help You Today

If you have been charged with a drug crime, either state or federal, you need a dedicated and knowledgeable attorney. The skilled Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorneys at The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley are here to help you. Don’t hesitate to reach out to us today for assistance.

Source:

https://www.ussc.gov/research/research-reports/mandatory-minimum-penalties-drug-offenses-federal-system

FAQs About Medical Marijuana in Illinois

December 7th, 2017 at 8:22 am

medical marijuana, Rolling Meadows drug charges attorney, medical marijuana program, drug charges, Illinois drug lawsAccording to the ACLU, approximately 52 percent of all drug arrests conducted in the United States in 2010 were for marijuana-related crimes. This is largely thanks to the various drug laws that were passed during the government’s “war on drugs” campaign in the 70s—many of which imposed relatively harsh penalties for possessing or distributing marijuana.

However, in more recent years, several states, including Illinois, have relaxed their drug laws a bit and now permit the use of marijuana for medical purposes. Unfortunately many of these modern medical marijuana laws are not well understood by the public. Consider the following frequently asked questions to help clear some confusion. 

Q: What is “medical marijuana”?

A: The National Institute on Drug Abuse’s website notes that the term “medical marijuana” (sometimes called “medical cannabis”) refers to using the whole marijuana plant, or its extracts, to treat symptoms of illness. In other words, medical marijuana is, from a scientific standpoint, essentially the same as recreational marijuana.

Q: Who can legally obtain medical marijuana in Illinois?

A: In 2013, Illinois lawmakers passed the Compassionate Use of Medical Cannabis Pilot Program Act which was a temporary test program designed, at its core, to allow Illinois residents with qualifying debilitating medical conditions to use medical marijuana as part of their treatment plans.

Under this act qualifying “debilitating medical conditions” include Parkinson’s disease, glaucoma, muscular dystrophy, rheumatoid arthritis, as well as a number of other conditions. This pilot program was originally intended to run until the end of 2017 but last year lawmakers passed Senate Bill 10 which effectively extended the program until July 2020.

However, it should be noted that if you were convicted of a felony drug crime in the past then you are not eligible to participate in Illinois’ pilot medical marijuana program.

Q: How much medical marijuana can a qualifying patient possess under Illinois law?

A: Under Illinois’ Compassionate Use of Medical Cannabis Pilot Program Act, a qualifying patient who has properly registered and who possesses a registry identification card may not possess more than two and one-half ounces of usable marijuana.

Q: If I have a valid medical marijuana card can I legally grow marijuana at home for my own consumption?

A: No, under Illinois’ current medical marijuana laws individual cultivation is not allowed.

Need Legal Advice? Contact a Local Drug Charges Attorney

At The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley we defend clients against various felony and misdemeanor drug charges across Illinois. Thanks to Attorney Christopher Cosley, a former prosecutor in the Felony and Drug Division, our firm is well acquainted with the legal tactics commonly used by prosecuting attorneys in drug cases and we use this valuable insight to benefit our clients. To find out what an experienced Rolling Meadows drug charges attorney can do for you, contact our office today.

Source:

https://www.aclu.org/gallery/marijuana-arrests-numbers

https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugfacts/marijuana-medicine

What Does it Mean to Manufacture a Controlled Substance in Illinois?

September 6th, 2017 at 7:15 am

controlled substance, drug charges, Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer, manufacturing a controlled substance, Illinois drug crimesIn Illinois, it is illegal under state law to manufacture a controlled substance. But what does this actually mean? In general terms, it means that an individual can be convicted of a crime if he or she makes illegal drugs or other substances. However, the legal definition is quite a bit more specific.

Key Definitions re the Unlawful Manufacture of a Controlled Substance

Under the Illinois Controlled Substances Act the terms “manufacture” and “controlled substance” are carefully defined as follows below.

Manufacture: The Illinois Controlled Substances Act defines the term “manufacture” as “the production, preparation, propagation, compounding, conversion, or processing… either directly or indirectly by”:

  • Extracting substances of natural origin;
  • Chemical synthesis; or
  • A combination of extracting and chemical synthesis.

Note that this definition does include any packaging (or repackaging) of a controlled substance or labeling of its container. However, the term manufacturing does not include:

  • The preparation or compounding of a controlled substance by an ultimate user for his/her own use; or
  • Practitioners (i.e. licensed physicians, dentists, veterinarians, pharmacists, nurses, etc.), their agents, or those they supervise preparing, compounding, packaging, or labeling a controlled substance in the course of their professional practice or as part of lawful teaching, research, or chemical analysis.

Controlled Substance: Under the Illinois Controlled Substances Act, a “controlled substance” is defined as (1) a drug, immediate precursor, substance, or a synthetic drug listed in the Schedules of Article II of the Controlled Substances Act or (2) a drug, immediate precursor, or other substance designated as a controlled substance by the Department. Note that this definition does not include wine, distilled spirits, malt beverages, or tobacco.

Penalties

The penalties that a defendant who is convicted of unlawfully manufacturing a controlled substance in Illinois will face varies depending on how much of the controlled substance was manufactured. However, manufacture of a controlled substance is often tried as a Class 4 felony that is punishable by one to three years in prison and a fine of up to $25,000.

However, offenders can alternatively be placed on probation for up to 30 months (rather than being sentenced to serve time in prison) if the court finds that imprisonment is not appropriate nor necessary given the circumstances.

Reach Out to Us Today for Help

The unlawful manufacture of a controlled substance in Illinois is a serious criminal offense that is often tried as a felony carrying a hefty prison sentence. Therefore, if you have been charged with unlawfully manufacturing a controlled substance in Illinois it is vital that you retain a passionate Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer who possesses the requisite experience and knowhow to vigorously defend you. At The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley our seasoned legal time tirelessly fights for the rights of clients throughout Illinois and would be happy to fight for you. Contact our Rolling Meadows office today to schedule your initial consultation.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs5.asp?ActID=1941&ChapterID=53

A Drug Crime Conviction Could Lead to You Being Deported

April 21st, 2017 at 9:30 am

drug crime conviction, Rolling Meadows Drug Crimes Defense LawyerMany people who live in Rolling Meadows and the surrounding communities do not have United States citizenship. These individuals are living in the U.S. on a visa or as a permanent resident, or because they hold a green card. Immigrants who are in the United States legally, or even illegally, and find themselves in trouble with the law over drug offenses could face deportation or removal from the country if they are convicted.

Non-U.S. citizens who are deported are often prevented from reentering the country again for many years after their deportation. Often times, non-U.S. citizens who are convicted for drug crimes involving controlled substances or methamphetamines are more likely to be deported or removed from the country than someone who is convicted for marijuana possession based on small quantities of marijuana. The harder and more addictive the drug that is involved in the crime, the more serious the consequences may be upon conviction.

The Challenges of Deportation

When a non-U.S. citizen (also known as a foreign national or a legal alien) is convicted for a drug crime in Illinois, deportation from the United States is often one of the most serious consequences for his or her criminal activity. Deportation back to a native country can be a big problem for someone who is convicted for a drug crime, especially if he or she does not know anyone in his or her native country, has no family connections in his or her native country, or does not speak his or her native country’s language. Not only that, but it is very likely that the immigrant has built a life in the United States. He or she most likely has family, friends, a job, and a life here in Illinois and he or she could lose it all if convicted with drug charges.

Fight Your Drug Charges to Avoid Deportation

The best way to avoid being deported is to not be convicted on your drug charges. If you are not convicted, then the federal government does not have grounds to force your deportation or removal from the country. Getting the drug charges against you dropped or dismissed is your best bet.

By working with an experienced drug crimes defense lawyer, you will give yourself your best shot at success for beating your charges. An experienced criminal defense lawyer will review the facts of your case and your arrest and will identify each possible grounds for defense. Together, you and your lawyer will decide on a defense strategy.

Reach Out to Us for Help

More often than not, first time offenders who are convicted of minor drug offenses often avoid being deported. However, there is no guarantee that you will not be deported if you are convicted of a drug related offense in Illinois. Drug charges need to be taken seriously, and especially so if you are not a U.S. citizen. Please do not hesitate to contact a passionate Rolling Meadows drug crimes defense attorney immediately for assistance with your case.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs5.asp?ActID=1941&ChapterID=53

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