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Archive for the ‘driving under the influence’ tag

Drugs, Alcohol and Driving: Serious Criminal Consequences

August 19th, 2016 at 7:00 am

Drugs, Alcohol and Driving: Serious Criminal ConsequencesDriving under the influence is a serious offense in Illinois, and law enforcement does not take it lightly. Illinois law provides for three different types of DUI offenses: driving under the influence of alcohol, driving under the influence of drugs, or driving under the influence of drugs and alcohol, according to 625 ILCS 5/11-501.

Driving Under the Influence of Drugs

When it comes to driving under the influence of drugs, there are two levels of this offense: driving under the influence and driving with drugs in your system. Driving under the influence of drugs involves the arresting officer’s judgment call concerning whether you were operating a vehicle while under the influence of drugs. Only officers who have received training concerning how people behave when they are on drugs are really qualified to make this judgment call. Inexperienced law enforcement officers may lack the skill and training to appropriately and correctly identify suspected drugged drivers. In order to be convicted, there must be proof of the charge that you were under the influence of drugs at the time of the arrest. The smell of drugs (e.g., the smell of marijuana) or the driver’s admission of having taken drugs at some other time in the past is not enough. However, if drug paraphernalia is found in the vehicle, or the driver is unable to perform field sobriety tests, this evidence is more concrete.

Driving with drugs in your system involves being tested to prove that you had some concentration of drug in your body at the time of arrest or shortly thereafter. These tests could include breath, blood, or urine testing. These tests must be completed by individuals who are trained and qualified to perform these tests. For instance, breathalyzer testing can be conducted by a law enforcement officer who is trained to perform such testing. However, blood and urine testing must be done by a qualified medical professional, and must be done within a certain amount of time after you are taken into custody by law enforcement. There are also specific procedural requirements for how these types of tests are conducted, which are provided for under the law. The testing procedure must be performed in accordance with the law, or else any resulting evidence may be inadmissible against you.

Driving Under the Influence of Drugs And Alcohol

Drugs and alcohol can be a dangerous mixture, with highly intoxicating effects. Police have the right to request a blood or urine sample for testing to determine whether or not the driver was intoxicated at the time of arrest.

Charged With A DUI? Call The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley

Facing a DUI for driving under the influence of drugs, alcohol, or both is serious business. If you have been charged with a DUI, please do not hesitate to contact a passionate Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney immediately for help with your case.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=062500050K11-501

Field Sobriety Testing in Illinois

December 23rd, 2015 at 4:54 pm

Illinois defense attorney, Illinois dui lawyer, Illinois criminal lawyer, Law enforcement in Illinois takes driving under the influence of alcohol very seriously. Police regularly conduct DUI checkpoints, and pull over drivers who are suspected of operating a vehicle while under the influence. Before making an arrest, officers generally will ask a suspected drunk driver to participate in field sobriety testing, in accordance with 625 ILCS 5/11-501.2(a-5).

What Are the Standard Field Sobriety Tests in Illinois?

Many people have heard of field sobriety tests, but are not clear on what these tests are or what they entail until they are faced with them while pulled over on the side of the road. The standard field sobriety tests (FST) were developed by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and consist of three tests designed to present indicators of intoxication of an individual. The tests include:

  • The One Leg Stand. Under this test, a suspect is required to stand on one leg, raising one foot off the ground six inches and must maintain his or her balance for a full 30 seconds;
  • The Walk-and-Turn. A suspect is instructed to execute the test according to the officer’s instructions exactly. The instructions require the suspect to walk nine steps forward in a heel-to-toe fashion in a straight line, turn around on one leg, and walk nine steps backwards; and
  • The Horizontal Gaze Nystagmus. When a person is under the influence of alcohol, they may exhibit involuntary jerky eye movements, or the inability to smoothly visually track an object.

These tests assess physiological responses to alcohol, such as slow movement, poor sense of balance and poor memory function, to determine whether a driver might be intoxicated.

How Accurate Are These Tests?

One might wonder how accurate FSTs can be when people have medical conditions, are panicked by being pulled over by law enforcement, or have other legitimate reasons for not being able to perform the FSTs perfectly. Research conducted for the NHTSA on just how accurate these tests are at determining whether a suspect is under the influence reveals that:

  • The one leg stand test is accurate about 83 percent of the time;
  • The walk-and-turn test is only accurate 79 percent of the time; and
  • The horizontal gaze nystagmus test is accurate 88 percent of the time.

Field sobriety tests are voluntary, and you can refuse to participate in them. While there are consequences of not submitting to FSTs, it can be helpful if you are later charged since you will not have those tests as evidence against you. Failing one of these tests often gives the officer probable cause to make an arrest.

Let Our Attorneys Help You

Being arrested for a DUI is serious business. If you are facing DUI charges, you refused to submit to field sobriety testing, or you refused to submit to a breathalyzer or some other chemical testing to determine your blood alcohol concentration, you will need to consult with an experienced DUI criminal defense attorney. Your lawyer can discuss what options are available to you. Please contact a dedicated Rolling Meadows DUI attorney immediately at the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley. You can reach us at (847) 394-3200 today.

 

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=062500050K11-501.2

http://dwitrialprep.com/sfst_anacopa_1998.pdf

Strategies for a DUI Trial

December 17th, 2015 at 10:10 am

Illinois DUI lawyer, Illinois criminal attorney, Illinois defense lawyer, Many people who are charged with DUI under Illinois law are first-time offenders, and they have no idea what the DUI trial process will be like or even how it should be approached to either get the case dismissed or get the charges reduced. An experienced DUI criminal defense attorney with many years of trial experience can acquaint you with the process, and after developing an understanding of the facts about your specific DUI case, your attorney will be able to help you develop the best strategy for your trial.

The fines and penalties for a DUI conviction are significant and cannot be taken lightly, so presenting your best possible defense to the charges you face is in your interest. You want your DUI charges to go away, and a skilled and experienced criminal defense attorney will be able to evaluate the options that are available. to you. There are a number of strategies you may be able to utilize. For instance, you may present any of the following:

  • Evidence suggesting innocence or mitigation of your alleged crime. When you can produce evidence that you are innocent of the charges that are pending against you, or that you are guilty of a lesser crime, this evidence can be helpful in your DUI trial.
  • Lack of evidence in support of your charges. On the flip side, if the prosecution lacks sufficient evidence against you for the alleged crime, your DUI case could be dismissed.
  • Witness testimony supporting your defense. Witness testimony that supports your defense is helpful in your DUI trial. If a passenger observed how the arresting officer failed to adhere to proper DUI field sobriety testing or arrest protocol, this testimony could be used to have your DUI case dismissed. You yourself could also be a witness at your own trial, if your DUI criminal defense lawyer thinks this would be a good idea.
  • Expert witness testimony supporting your defense. An expert witness could offer evidence to suggest that the breathalyzer test or other chemical test results are incorrect. You could have produced a false positive blood alcohol concentration, or there could have been factors that contributed to a higher than accurate blood alcohol concentration estimate, and an expert witness could offer medical or scientific evidence to support your defense.

Motions Can Help You

There are situations in which you can use a motion during your DUI trial to get the case or certain evidence thrown out, or to require the prosecution to do, or not do, something. Motions can change the course of prosecution in your DUI case and when used effectively and appropriately, motions can help strengthen your defense.

Motions are written requests made to the court by a movant party (i.e., the party or person making the motion is a movant), and the court will decide whether to grant or deny the motion. Motions are sometimes very complicated, full of legal language, and have to be submitted in a certain format and within certain time limits. An experienced DUI lawyer will know which motions are applicable to your DUI case and whether you should make them in your defense.

Contact Our Office Today

DUI trial strategy is an important aspect of your DUI criminal defense, and an experienced DUI criminal trial attorney can help you through this process. Please contact a passionate Rolling Meadows DUI attorney immediately if you need assistance with your case. We are happy to help you today.

 

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=062500050K11-501

The True Cost of a DUI

September 9th, 2015 at 9:01 pm

Illinois DUI lawyer, Illinois defense attorney, Illinois criminal lawyer,A driving while under the influence of drugs or alcohol charge in Illinois is serious business. Not only does a DUI conviction carry serious penalties, it also carries hefty financial consequences. The consequences for a DUI conviction are laid out in 625 ILCS 5/11-501(c)(1)-(5), which include jail time, fines and mandatory community service. There is also the unfortunate chance that getting a DUI conviction will result in the development of a poor reputation amongst peers and colleagues.

The total true cost for a DUI depends on a lot of factors, such as whether the DUI is a first-time offense, whether there was any property damage as a result of the DUI (as would be the case of a drunk driving collision), whether anyone was hurt as a result of the DUI, and how intoxicated the driver is at the time of the DUI.

Money Considerations

A DUI is an immensely expensive and the costs add up quickly. For instance, you will have to pay:

  • The DUI fines, which at the minimum comes to $1,500;
  • Court costs;
  • For mandatory remedial substance abuse educational classes, and the corresponding counseling fees;
  • For any alcohol and drug screening;
  • To get your vehicle out of impound, if applicable;
  • The cost of posting bail, if applicable;
  • Fees to get your driver’s license reinstated, which include a restoration fee, a fee for a new driver’s license, and a hearing fee;
  • Insurance premiums after a DUI conviction; and
  • Installation of an ignition interlock device, and the monthly rental rate for the device, in addition to maintenance and regular calibration costs.

The Cost of Lost Opportunities

In addition to the out-of-pocket costs associated with a DUI, there will also be the cost of lost opportunities. For instance, you might experience:

  • Job loss. People who have a job that requires them to drive as part of their job functions often lose their job after a DUI conviction;
  • Loss of future employment opportunities. A DUI on your record in Illinois is permanent, and having this type of conviction on your criminal record might make it impossible for you to get certain types of work in the future;
  • Unpaid time off from work/missed school. You will most likely miss time at work or school due to the mandatory classes, court appearances, jail time, and community service obligations associated with a DUI conviction; and
  • Loss of driver’s license. A DUI conviction will cost you your driver’s license for a period of up to one year. This means that you will have to rely on others and public transportation in order to get around.

Call The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley

If you have been charged with a DUI in Illinois, it is important that you fight the charges that are pending against you. Feel free to contact an experienced Rolling Meadows criminal lawyer immediately. Contact the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley for a consultation on your case.

 

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=062500050K11-501

Steps for Getting Your Driving Privileges Reinstated

August 5th, 2015 at 7:37 pm

Illinois defense attorney, Illinois DUI lawyer, Illinois criminal attorney, When driving privileges are taken away in Illinois, they may be taken away in one of three manners:

  • Driver’s License Suspension. When your driver’s license is suspended, your driving privileges have temporarily been withdrawn. You will get your driving privileges back so long as you do not do anything to make your situation worse. A suspension only lasts for a designated amount of time, or until you pay or reach an agreement concerning payment for money that you owe, such as for outstanding child support or unpaid court fines.
  • Driver’s License Revocation. When your driver’s license is revoked, your driving privileges have been taken away indefinitely, and there is no guarantee that you will ever get them reinstated.
  • Driver’s License Cancellation. When your driver’s license is canceled, you have no driving privileges in Illinois.

Reinstatement Of Your Driver’s License

Getting your driver’s license reinstated takes work. The Illinois Secretary of State has offered guidance on what you must do to get your license back. Below are the steps you need to take in order to get your driver’s license reinstated.

  1. Must be eligible. You must be eligible for reinstatement, meaning that you have reached your eligibility date for reinstatement of your driver’s license.
  2. Schedule and attend a consultation with a hearing officer. Consult with an informal hearing officer about your driving record and why your license was suspended or revoked. The officer will provide guidance concerning your requirements for getting your license reinstated.
  3. Complete the relevant alcohol and/or drug requirements. If applicable, you will need to complete an alcohol and/or drug evaluation, which must be performed by a licensed Division of Alcohol and Substance Abuse provider, within the six months leading up to your reinstatement hearing. You will be classified into one of three categories by the evaluator, and your classification determines the additional requirements you must satisfy to get your license back.
    • Low risk. Low risk individuals must complete an alcohol and/or drug remedial education program.
    • Moderate to significant risk. These individuals must also complete the same alcohol and/or drug remedial education program as discussed above. Further, moderate risk individuals must provide proof that they have completed an early intervention, while significant risk individuals must provide proof that they have completed a recommended alcohol/drug treatment program with periodic updates about their status thereafter.
    • High risk. High risk individuals must provide proof that they have completed a recommended alcohol/drug treatment program with periodic updates about their status thereafter.
      • If the high risk individual is not dependent on drugs or alcohol, proof of abstinence or non-problematic use must be provided, as well as a clinical explanation that the person is not dependent upon drugs or alcohol.
      • If the high risk individual is dependent on drugs or alcohol, three independent sources must vouch for the individual’s abstinence from drugs or alcohol in writing, and three members of the individual’s support or recovery group must vouch for the individual’s participation in these programs in writing.
  4. Attend your hearing. Formal hearings must be requested in writing, with payment of a filing fee, and are for serious offenses, such as accidents involving a death or repeat DUI offenses. Informal hearings are for less serious offenses or first-time alcohol or drug related offenses.
  5. Provide proof of financial responsibility. You must next file proof that you have minimum liability insurance with the Secretary of State’s office, which must be maintained for a period of three years. Submissions must be of a certified insurance policy, surety bond or cash deposit, and must be made on an SR-22 certificate.
  6. Pay reinstatement fee. Finally, you must pay the fee associated with your specific type of reinstatement.

Call the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley

When your driver’s license is suspended or revoked, it can make getting around a challenge. Get your license reinstated as soon as possible. Please contact a skilled Rolling Meadows defense attorney immediately. Call the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley. Our phone number is (847) 394-3200.

Different DUI Standards for Medical Marijuana Patients

May 13th, 2015 at 11:56 am

Illinois defense attorney, Illinois criminal lawyer, drug crimes, Illinios drug laws, Illinois is slowly limping into the age of medical marijuana. While getting the system up and running is taking some time, there are some very good things in the state’s medical marijuana laws. One of those good things has to do with how medical marijuana patients will be treated when it comes to DUI charges.

Illinois DUI Marijuana Charges for Non-Medical Marijuana Users

People who choose to use marijuana in Illinois without the protections that are afforded to medical marijuana users run serious risks if they are ever pulled over on suspicion of a DUI. Under Illinois statute, a person can be found guilty of DUI if he or she drives or is in actual physical control of a vehicle while there is any amount of a drug, substance, or compound in his or her blood, breath, or urine resulting from the unlawful use or consumption of cannabis. Now, as most marijuana users are aware, certain metabolites of marijuana can remain in a person’s system for days or even weeks after the drug has been used and the effects of the drug have worn off. This means that technically a person who uses non-medical marijuana in Illinois and then drives two or three weeks later can be prosecuted for driving under the influence of drugs, even though all of the science indicates that the marijuana would be having no effect on the person’s driving at that time.

Illinois DUI Marijuana Charges for Medical Marijuana Patients

Fortunately, medical marijuana patients will be treated differently. The Illinois law that deals with this particular type of DUI specifically exempts people who are patients licensed under the Compassionate Use of Medical Cannabis Pilot Program. This does not mean, however, that medical marijuana patients will be allowed to drive while high. A different part of the DUI statute makes it a crime to drive while under the influence of any drug or combination of drugs to a degree that the person is rendered incapable of safe driving. So a urine test showing marijuana metabolites will not be enough to convict a person of DUI, but evidence of marijuana intoxication at the time of driving will suffice. One way the State may try to prove intoxication in these cases is through the use of drug recognition experts, or DREs. You may be aware of the standard field sobriety tests that cops perform on suspected drunk drivers. DREs are law enforcement officers who have been trained to administer a longer battery of tests that allegedly indicate whether someone has been using a drug other than alcohol, and if so, what type of drug they have been using.

Call the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley

If you have been charged with a DUI, you need the help of an experienced Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney. Christopher Cosley has spent his career defending the rights of people like you. Call the Law Offices of Christopher M . Cosley at (847)394-3200.

Illinois May Ditch the Hard Suspension of Licenses after a DUI Arrest

March 23rd, 2015 at 6:53 pm

Illinois criminal defense attorney, Illinois defense lawyer, criminal penalties, Driving under the influence, or “DUI” is a criminal charge that carries with it a host of possible consequences. People who have been injured by intoxicated drivers or who have lost family members in car accidents often advocate for extremely harsh punishment for people caught driving under the influence. Surprisingly, however, even many of these advocates are on board with getting rid of the “hard time” 30-day suspension of the person’s driver’s license that accompanies a DUI arrest in Illinois.

What is a Hard Suspension?

A hard suspension of a person’s driver’s license is a suspension with no exceptions. During a hard suspension a driver is not allowed to drive at all. This is opposed to a suspension where the driver is only allowed to drive under certain circumstances, such as being required to use an ignition interlock device. These are the devices that can be installed in cars that require the driver to blow into them to prove they are not intoxicated in order to operate the vehicle. Hard suspensions prevent drivers from driving to work, taking their children to school, going to alcohol treatment, or fulfilling any of a whole variety of basic life functions. While people who live in certain parts of Chicago may have reliable enough public transportation to do all of these things without driving, those living in the suburbs or in rural parts of the state can lose jobs and support networks. If the goal is to prevent future alcohol abuse and encourage treatment, hard suspensions work against that goal. Yet under current Illinois law, there is a mandatory 30-day hard suspension that follows a DUI arrest.

Movement to Eliminate the Automatic Hard Suspension

The Chicago Tribune reports that the Illinois State Bar Association has proposed ending the mandate that people arrested for DUI completely lose their driver’s licenses for at least 30 days, and Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) is supporting the move; as is a local group called “Alliance Against Intoxicated Motorists.” What is the catch? Drivers would be able to get out of the 30-day suspension if they agreed to use an ignition interlock device whenever they drove during the suspension period. This would allow them to go to work, treatment, and other places they need to be while still keeping the community safe. It would also encourage the use of the ignition interlock device, preventing the drivers from drinking and driving on a suspended license. Both the drivers and the community win.

Call the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley

If you have been cited for driving under the influence, you need an experienced Rolling Meadows DUI attorney. That is why you should call the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley. We handle these unique cases regularly and can provide you with the representation you deserve. Reach out to us at (847)394-3200.

Legal Issues Surrounding DUI Checkpoints

October 9th, 2014 at 7:32 pm

Illinios criminal defense attorney, Illinois DUI attorney, driving while intoxiated, DWI, Driving under the influence (DUI) cases are some of the more common cases in criminal court. While many cases may be relatively straightforward, there are certain issues that can pop up concerning police procedure in bringing these charges. Of course, each criminal case involving a DUI or other criminal charges should be evaluated in light of the particular facts surrounding the case in order to determine any issues present, as well as options the specific defendant has in addressing the charges.

One such issue that may become relevant in a DUI case is the context in which the defendant was pulled over. Some of those charged with DUI may be observed to be driving in a reckless manner by law enforcement; others may have committed a traffic infraction giving the officer pretext for the stop. Still others may have been charged with a DUI as the result of passing through a DUI checkpoint. A recent report looks at DUI checkpoints and the potential legal issues that result from them in some states, including Illinois.

No Refusal

In some states across the country, including Illinois, law enforcement officials are allowed to conduct what are known as “no-refusal” DUI checkpoints. While the legality of DUI checkpoints in general has been established for quite some time, these specific types of checkpoints are raising concerns in states that conduct them. No-refusal checkpoints involve ordering drivers who are suspected of DUI to submit to a blood test if they first refuse a standard field sobriety test.

The blood test is generally conducted after probable cause for commission of the crime is found, but some defense attorneys are saying the procedure is just a way to get around other laws in place. One problem is that the search warrants claiming probable cause to administer a blood test against the person’s wishes are reportedly mass-produced, something that goes against the general requirements of specificity and narrow scope that such documents should have. At least 30 states, counting Illinois, either have conducted no-refusal initiatives, or have the authority to do so.

On the other hand, law enforcement officials cite staggering statistics about drunk drivers and the need to get them off the road as support for no-refusal initiatives. They say that no-refusal checkpoints do not use procedure that is any different than what would otherwise be used in a DUI stop. In some states, the only difference would be the site at which the blood is drawn – normally, suspects are taken to a hospital for a blood draw after a warrant is issued for the test, while during no-refusal initiatives, there may be nurses at a jail to draw blood there. It is notable that in some states, law enforcement and judges have declined to take part in no-refusal initiative because of concerns over their legality.

DUI Lawyer

If you have been charged with a DUI, contact the experienced Rolling Meadows defense attorneys at the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley today to schedule a consultation.

Chicago Suburbs Lead in DUI Arrests

September 2nd, 2014 at 7:11 am

DUI, breathalyzer tests, Chicago criminal defense attorney, driving under the influence, Although it may seem like more people recently are being arrested for driving under the influence (DUI), it should still be considered a serious offense that deserves the proper attention. Depending on the circumstances, an individual convicted of a DUI can face a substantial prison term, in addition to subsequent supervision and related costs and fines. Considering these potentially harsh penalties, it is advisable to consult with an attorney who is experienced in handling various types of DUI matters for those who are charged with the offense.

DUI Penalties

The sentencing guidelines for DUI offenses increase in severity depending on the circumstances surrounding the offense. The penalties are more severe for those convicted of multiple DUIs in the past than they are for a defendant who has been charged for the first time. Still, even those convicted of DUI for the first time can face a maximum of one year of incarceration and an additional six months if a child was in the car while the offender was operating it. Other factors, such as an accident, or the injury or death of another as the result of the DUI, would enhance sentencing structures, as well as lead to additional criminal charges.

 Popularity of DUI

According to a news article recently published, four suburbs just west of Chicago are in the top ten Illinois communities for most DUI arrests in 2013. It found the community of Rockford was first, with a total of 556 DUI arrests last year. The suburb of Naperville was a close second, with 553 arrests for DUI, which was actually a four percent decrease from the 576 that occurred in Naperville in 2012.  The remainder of the suburbs were Carol Stream, which was number five on the list with 392 arrests, Elmhurst ranked sixth with 300, and Aurora, with a total of 256 individuals arrested for DUI, came in tenth place across the state.

The Alliance Against Intoxicated Motorists completed the survey and compiled the data related to Illinois’ DUI arrests, which it does annually. The purpose of the survey, in part, is to determine how many DUI-related arrests are made by law enforcement in the state of Illinois and to recognize the police departments and officers who are the most productive in combating drinking and driving. Almost 700 police agencies were surveyed, and about 84 percent of those responded. Other suburbs were notably ranked in the top 25 for DUI arrests, including Wheaton and Lombard.

Criminal Defense Attorney

DUI cases call for expert guidance from an experienced Illinois defense attorney. If you or someone you know has been charged with a DUI in the Chicago area of Illinois, contact the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley today for a consultation to discuss your matter. We have experience representing clients in Cook County and the surrounding area.

Severe Consequences for Fatal DUI Driver

April 21st, 2014 at 2:22 pm

drug crimes, lawyer, attorney, criminal defense lawyer, criminal defense attorney, Illinois, ChicagoMany people struggle with addiction and as a result, many criminal cases involve the use, possession, or other acts that occur while under the influence of drugs and alcohol. While these cases alone are often troubling, combining the use of illicit substances and deciding to operate a vehicle can significantly compound a tragic outcome. Such was the case for a man who was recently sentenced to 12 years in prison after being responsible for a fatal accident while under the influence of drug and alcohol.

The Criminal Case

The defendant was charged with driving under the influence of alcohol, heroin, and alprazolam at the time of the crash that occurred when he rear-ended a car, killing an 11-year-old boy and severely injuring another car occupant. The car struck was stopped in a line of other vehicles because of an earlier accident that occurred on the road.

After the accident, a urine analysis determined that the defendant had heroin and alprazolam in his system in addition to an illegal amount of alcohol while driving. He pleaded guilty late last year to two counts of aggravated DUI, which meant he would face a maximum sentence of 14 years of incarceration. He was sentenced last week to 12 years jail time, plus a $4,500 fine. Illinois law will require him to serve at least 85 percent of his sentence.

The Dangers of Heroin Use

This case represents just one of the dangers of heroin use. Not only was the incident that claimed the life of an 11-year-old completely preventable, but the defendant will have to deal with the consequences of his actions for the rest of his life. The prosecutor on the case used the defendant’s sentencing hearing as an opportunity to expand on the potential repercussions of using the drug. He stated that heroin in particular is a highly addictive drug that quickly leads users to uncontrollably self-destruct. While the issue of addiction is one that deserves attention, it takes a back seat when that addiction gives rise to criminal behavior that has permanent, devastating effects on other people.

This case represents one of the most tragic outcomes possible for those who participate in drug use. Cases involving the illicit use of drugs and alcohol commonly bring up addiction and treatment issues for the perpetrator of the crime, but in cases like these, where a life is lost senselessly, the needs of the defendant are often secondary to the interest in public safety. If you have been charged with a crime involving drugs, it is crucial to speak to a knowledgeable criminal defense attorney about your options and rights. The attorneys at the Law Office of Christopher M. Cosley have successful experience representing clients charged with drug offenses in the Chicago area. Contact us today to schedule a consultation.

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