Search
Facebook Twitter Our Blog
The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley
24 HOUR ANSWERING | 847-394-3200
SERVICE

1855 Rohlwing Road, Suite D, Rolling Meadows, IL 60008

24 HOUR ANSWERING SERVICE

Archive for the ‘criminal conviction’ tag

The Impact of a Criminal Conviction

August 13th, 2018 at 4:42 pm

criminal background checks, criminal conviction, employment and criminal conviction, Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer, criminal historyWhen watching television cop shows, it seems like everyone in the world has been convicted or charged with some type of crime, even if by accident or mistake. These television shows attempt to take you through the criminal process of being charged with a crime and the sentence that can be imposed should you be found guilty. While there is a large amount of coverage dedicated to the crime itself and the sentence, there is not often any discussion on what the impact of a criminal charge can be on one’s life. The impact of a criminal conviction is far reaching and impacts more areas of life than one might think.

Employment

Many people who have ever filled out a job application know that one of the questions asked during the hiring process is whether or not an individual has been convicted of a crime. While there are laws in place to protect some ex-criminals from being discriminated against, there are plenty of employment opportunities lost because of a criminal conviction. There are certain jobs that require an applicant to have a background that does not contain a criminal conviction. If you have been convicted of a crime, do not lie about it. Many employers will run a criminal background check on prospective employees to make sure that they did not lie about their history and ensure they are a good fit for the company.

Housing

In addition to affecting your ability to get a job, housing can be a problem for convicted individuals. Some apartment complexes and homeowner’s associations will not allow a property to be rented or bought by someone with a criminal record. A lot of this has to do with the bias that is against those with a criminal record.

Reputation

Being convicted of a crime can change the public opinion about someone. Once an individual has been villainized in the media, it is often hard to erase that image in people’s minds. It takes years and hard work to build a great reputation, but only moments to destroy it. Those with criminal convictions might find it hard to engage in the same social activities that they did before the conviction because people are wary and have a bias.

Reach Out to Us Today for Help

If you have been charged with a crime, do not just ignore it. You need a dedicated defense attorney who is ready to advocate for your case. The dedicated Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney at The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley is available to help you avoid a life-altering criminal conviction. We use every defense and piece of evidence to give you the best defense and outcome possible given the circumstances. Contact us today for a consultation.

Source:

http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/ct-illinois-laws-criminal-records-118-biz-20170117-story.html

What Does it Mean to be an Accessory to a Crime?

February 2nd, 2018 at 7:07 pm

accessory to a crime, aiding and abetting, Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer, criminal conviction, committing a crimeWhen a crime is committed, the person who actually carries out the illegal act is referred to as the “principal.” Any person who assists in the commission of the offense but did not actually participate in committing the crime is called an “accessory.” For example, pretend that two friends decide to rob a bank and they agree that Friend A is going to go into the bank and rob it while Friend B waits for him out front in the getaway car. If these friends carry out the bank robbery as planned, then Friend A would be principal (as he committed the actual robbery) while Friend B would be the accessory (given that he assisted in the commission of the robbery).

Generally speaking, an accessory to a crime is anyone who willingly and knowingly aids and abets the principal in committing a crime. This assistance can come either before, after, or during the commission of the crime. However, it is important to note that the precise definition of what it takes to qualify as an accessory to a crime varies a bit from state to state.

Illinois’ Main Aiding and Abetting Law

Illinois’ main aiding and abetting l law is codified under code section 720 ILCS 5/5-2 and in relevant part states that it is illegal to knowingly help or assist someone else commit a crime. Regardless of whether this unlawful assistance comes before, during, or after the commission of the crime, the aiding party can still be held liable as an accessory to the crime. Furthermore, it is important to note that an accessory to a crime does not need to have been physically present at the scene of the crime in order to be found guilty.

The Penalty for Being an Accessory to a Crime in Illinois

You may be surprised to learn that a convicted accessory in Illinois can receive the same penalty as the principal whom he or she aided. In other words, if the bank robbing friends from the example above were caught and convicted in Illinois, then Friend B, who was guilty of being an accessory to the crime, is eligible to receive the same sentence (including jail time, fines, probation, restitution, etc.) that he would have been eligible for had he been the principal in the bank robbery rather than the accessory.

Need Legal Advice?

If you have been accused of committing a crime or of being an accessory to a crime, it is critical that you consult with a talented Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer about mounting your defense without delay. Time is of the essence, so it is important that you find a lawyer who has experience handling cases similar to yours to advise you on your legal options. At The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley we represent clients in a wide variety of criminal cases throughout Illinois and would be happy to assist you.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs4.asp?DocName=072000050HArt.+5&ActID=1876&ChapterID=53&SeqStart=7200000&SeqEnd=7800000

My Teen Has Been Arrested. Now What?

June 19th, 2017 at 2:37 pm

juvenile crimes, Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney, teen has been arrested, juvenile criminal case, criminal convictionRaising children can be one of the most rewarding yet challenging parts of adult life. Our children go out into the world as extensions of ourselves, and as parents we constantly worry about their safety and how we can keep them out of trouble. We even attempt to plan ahead for any potential issues that may arise—we teach our children the difference between right and wrong and instill moral values. Still, bad decisions are made.

Decisions can Become Criminal in a Split Second

It only takes a moment for an otherwise thoughtful and law abiding teen to make a decision that can change the rest of his or her life. According to federal records in 2010, 1.6 million juveniles were arrested. Recent governmental research suggests that nearly 30.2 percent of American citizens will be arrested by the time they are 23 years of age.

The most common types of juvenile criminal cases involve the following:

These crimes do not make our teens bad people. However, they may land our loved ones in trouble with the law—loved ones who may have been in the wrong place at the wrong time. Children may succumb to peer pressure without understanding the dire consequences that they are risking with their future. One bad decision does not have to, nor should it, relegate our youth to an entire life of crime.

Police Interaction With Our Children

For many parents who are trying to protect the interests of their children once they have been arrested, the most shocking development is that there are little national procedural standards for how police officers interact with minors once they have been arrested.

Police officers are required to notify a minor’s parents in a reasonable time after he or she has been arrested. Moreover, police are required to inform a minor’s parents of the nature of the charge as well as the next proposed steps that law enforcement will take in the case.

In the majority of instances, police will allow a parent to be present during an official interrogation. However, federally, there is no guarantee that protects a parent’s right to be present during a federal investigation inquiry.

Despite not having a constitutionally protected right to be present at your minor child’s interrogation, your minor does have a right to have a lawyer present during questioning. Additionally, at any time during the investigation, if your child asks for a lawyer, then the interview must end.

The most important step you can take to help your minor child who has been arrested to enlist the help of a talented Illinois criminal defense lawyer.

Erect Your Defense Immediately

Criminal investigations are fraught with peril. The government has extensive resources and the advantage of knowing their intentions. A criminal conviction for a juvenile can have disastrous effects on his or her future. It may affect the juvenile’s ability to gain employment, take advantage of certain governmental programs, or be able to secure a professional license. Contact our skilled and relentless Rolling Meadows juvenile criminal defense attorney at The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley. Call 847-394-3200.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs3.asp?ChapterID=50&ActID=1863

Retail Theft: Long Term Impacts of a Conviction for a Crime of Moral Turpitude

March 8th, 2017 at 10:43 am

retail theft-Rolling MeadowsThere are certain types crimes in Illinois that are considered crimes of moral turpitude. This means that the actions involved in committing the crime run counter to society’s sense of morals. Generally speaking, crimes of moral turpitude involve acts of deception or deceit, and reflect poorly on one’s character or trustworthiness. Examples of crimes that are considered crimes of moral turpitude in Illinois include:

  • Retail theft;
  • Assault;
  • Aggravated battery;
  • Stalking;
  • Driving while under the influence of alcohol; and
  • Burglary.

Many people who commit forms of retail theft often do not think very deeply about the potential consequences they could face if caught and prosecuted under the law. Since no one is physically harmed by the crime of retail theft, many do not think of it as a serious offense or that a conviction could have a long-term impact on their life.  

What Are Some of the Consequences of a Conviction for a Crime of Moral Turpitude?

If you are convicted of a crime of moral turpitude, you will face a number of additional consequences above and beyond the jail time and fine associated with your criminal conviction.

  • You Could Face Deportation. A conviction for a crime of moral turpitude can have very serious impacts on someone who is not a United States citizen. A criminal conviction can mean that you will be deported and barred from reentering the country in the future. Similarly, lawful permanent residents can also be deported if they are convicted of a crime while in the U.S.
  • You Could Have Trouble Securing a Job. If you have a criminal record that lists a crime of moral turpitude, it is likely that prospective employers might think twice before hiring you. It might be very hard to secure employment in certain industries, such as banking.
  • You May Face Challenges Getting into School or Getting Licensure. A criminal conviction for a crime of moral turpitude tarnishes your image and can make it difficult to get into certain educational or vocational programs. Furthermore, there are several professional licensing agencies and boards that might refrain from granting you licensure, despite your qualifications because you have a criminal history for a crime involving moral turpitude.

Your best chance of getting through the aftermath of an arrest for retail theft is to work closely with an experienced Illinois criminal defense lawyer to build your strongest possible defense. If you and your lawyer can get the charges dropped or reduced, you will not be convicted and you can avoid deportation, jail time, hefty fines, and other long-term impacts of criminal convictions.

Let Us Help You with Your Case

Retail theft is a serious offense despite the fact that no one suffers any physical harm as a result of the crime. But when you steal something it is an act of dishonesty and a crime of moral turpitude. If you are facing retail theft charges, you need the help of an experienced Rolling Meadows retail theft lawyer.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs4.asp?ActID=1876&ChapterID=53&SeqStart=39200000&SeqEnd=39700000

Identity Theft is a Theft Crime

November 9th, 2016 at 11:46 am

identity theft, Rolling Meadows Criminal Defense AttorneyCommitting Identity Theft

When most people think of identity theft they think of cyber hacking. However, identity theft is not just a crime that is committed by high-tech cyber thieves. Identity theft can occur when a person uses another individual’s personal identification information, such as one’s name, Social Security number, driver’s license, passport, credit card number, or other financial information, without permission, to commit fraud or other crimes.

Moreover, identity theft can be committed by stealing an individual’s mail and then completing credit card applications in the name of the victim. An identity thief may even open a new bank or a credit card account in a victim’s name or may change the mailing address of a victim’s existing account so he or she can use the account without the victim’s knowledge. When a thief uses an account without paying the bills, the delinquent accounts are noted on a victim’s credit report.

Additionally, there are many high-tech ways to commit identity theft. For instance, it is very common for an identity thief to hack into a victim’s email account or other online account to gain access to personal identifying information, which can be used for financial gain as well. It is also possible to purchase the personal identifying information of victims online through nefarious websites.

Potential Identify Theft Defenses

Identity theft is a serious criminal charge. It is a felony offense that carries lengthy jail time and substantial fines. Due to the seriousness of the consequences of being convicted for identity theft, it is important that, if you have been charged with identity theft, you fight the charges that are pressed against you. An experienced criminal defense lawyer can help you identify any potential defenses that you might have when you are charged with identity theft.

Accused of Being an Identity Thief? Get a Lawyer

Identity theft is a felony. Therefore, if you have been accused of identity theft, it is essential that you contact an experienced Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney as soon as possible to discuss your case and your options. Please call 847-394-3200 to schedule your consultation today.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=072000050K16-30

http://www.ncsl.org/research/financial-services-and-commerce/identity-theft-state-statutes.aspx

http://www.illinoisattorneygeneral.gov/consumers/idtheft.html

Back to Top Back to Top Back to Top