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Types of Burglary Charges in Illinois

June 8th, 2018 at 6:13 am

burglary charges, Class 2 felony, home invasion, residential burglary, Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorneysWhen someone thinks about burglary, he or she may think of a person breaking into a building, or home, to steal something valuable. While that is burglary, there are other instances in which a person can face burglary charges and not even realize it.

If you are facing charges for burglary in Illinois, it is imperative that you contact an attorney immediately. To be sure, a skilled lawyer can help protect your rights throughout each stage of the criminal process.

Types of Burglary in Illinois

The following includes various types of burglary charges in Illinois, all of which require the assistance of a skilled attorney.

Burglary

According to Illinois statute, burglary is committed when a person “knowingly enters or without authority remains within a building, house trailer, watercraft, aircraft, motor vehicle, railroad car, or any part thereof, with intent to commit therein a felony or theft.” Burglary is considered a Class 2 felony in Illinois and carries a potential sentence of three to seven years.

Residential Burglary

Residential burglary is considered more serious than the burglary of a building or other structure. A residential burglary is similar to the definition of burglary, but residential burglary is entering the dwelling of another with the intent to commit a felony. For a residential burglary conviction, it must be proven beyond a reasonable doubt that a person intended to commit a felony. This is a Class 1 felony.

Home Invasion

Home invasion is very similar to a residential burglary. However, it is made more serious and is considered a Class X felony. A home invasion occurs when an individual enters the home of another and knows that the residents of the home are present. Additionally, one of the following factors must be present:

  • The defendant possesses a weapon;
  • The defendant fires a gun;
  • The defendant threatens to fire a gun;
  • The defendant assaults a resident or threatens force; or
  • The defendant sexual assaults a resident, or commits some other form of abuse.

Criminal Trespass

Criminal trespass involves an individual entering the property of another without authority, but without the intention to commit a felony. Criminal trespass can either be a Class A misdemeanor or Class 4 felony. It is a felony when the residents of the property are present at the property; it is a misdemeanor when the residents are not present.

Possession of Burglary Tools

Even possessing burglary tools in Illinois is a crime; it is a Class 4 felony. However, a person must also have the intent to commit a felony with said tools. There are several items that could be considered burglary tools; however, common ones include lock picking kits, a crow bar, explosives, or even just a screwdriver. The intent to commit the felony determines the possession of burglary tools charge.

Contact Us Today for Help

With all the potential burglary charges possible in Illinois, you need an attorney who is well versed in all of the possibilities. Our passionate Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney at The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley can assist you throughout each step of your case. Contact us today to set up a consultation to find out how we can help you.

Sources:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs4.asp?ActID=1876&ChapterID=53&SeqStart=62600000&SeqEnd=63400000

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=072000050K19-3

Three Common Misconceptions About Criminal Law in Illinois

June 4th, 2018 at 9:13 am

criminal law in Illinois, Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorneys, first-time offenders, criminal sentencing guidelines, criminal case evidenceFor many people, their knowledge of the criminal justice system comes from television shows or other types of media. As such, they may get ideas in their heads of what should happen in criminal cases. In reality, many events that take place on television are not accurate depictions of actual criminal defense cases in Illinois.

Real life cases do not follow a script, and they can be unpredictable and shocking. It is important to know which facts are the truth and which are mere misconceptions. In light of this, consider the following three common misconceptions about the criminal justice system.

Any Time I Am Not Read My Miranda Rights, My Case Will Be Dismissed

A defendant must be read his or her rights anytime he or she is in custody of the police and is being interrogated. Being ‘in custody’ is a complicated issue. Merely talking to the police does not always mean that you are in custody, and neither does being placed in handcuffs.

There are several factors that go into determining when a defendant is in custody. If a defendant’s rights are not read, and he or she is in fact in custody, this does not mean the case will automatically be dismissed. Generally, any statement made during the custodial interrogation will be suppressed and unusable in trial. However, there is no requirement that a case must be dismissed.

If I Ask an Undercover Police Officer if He is a Police Officer, He Has to Tell Me

There is no requirement for a police officer, who is working undercover for whatever reason, to disclose that he or she is a police officer. Undercover operations are used in a variety of situations, and the disclosure of such would make an operation useless.

I Will Not Go to Jail for My First Offense; I Have a Family and a Job

There are sentencing guidelines for crimes committed in Illinois. The severity of the crime determines what the sentence will be. Just because someone has been charged with his or her first ever criminal act, it does not mean he or she could not go to jail. Judges have likely seen a lot of defendants go through their courtroom, including many first-time offenders and those with families. A judge will follow the sentencing guidelines and will not fall prey to emotional pleadings for no jail time in certain crimes.

We Can Help You Today

At the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley, we make sure to provide you with accurate legal information so you are aware of what is happening in your case. Our talented Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney has the skill and knowledge to defend you in an array of criminal matters. Contact us today to get the best defense available.

Sources:

https://repository.law.umich.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?referer=https://www.google.com/&httpsredir=1&article=1028&context=book_chapters

http://www.ilga.gov/commission/lru/2005pfc.pdf

What is Possession of a Controlled Substance in Illinois?

May 30th, 2018 at 5:10 pm

controlled substance, drug crimes, drug possession, possession of a controlled substance, Rolling Meadows defense attorneysPossession of a controlled substance is a serious drug crime in Illinois. The punishment for such a crime depends on the controlled substance in question and the amount of the substance that is found. Generally, the more of a substance a defendant has, the harsher the punishment can potentially be.

Most possession of a controlled substance crimes carry fines, probation, and jail or prison time. Ultimately, if you have been charged with this crime, it is imperative that you reach out to a skilled attorney for help immediately.

Controlled Substance

The first step in understanding possession of a controlled substance is being able to identify a controlled substance. Per 720 ILCS 570/102(f), a controlled substance is defined as a “drug, substance, immediate precursor, or synthetic drug.” The drugs included in this definition include heroin, cocaine, marijuana, methamphetamines, LSD, oxycodone, ketamine, ecstasy, and other controlled substances listed in Article II of 720 ILCS 570.

The controlled substances are broken into five different schedules. Schedule I drugs are those that are most likely to be abused. These include opiates, derivatives of opiates, and substances that are likely to induce hallucinations. Schedule V includes the least dangerous drugs. Contrary to Schedule I drugs, Schedule V drugs are those least likely to be abused.

Possession

The next step in understanding possession of a controlled substance is knowing what possession means. According to the Illinois Controlled Substances Act, it is unlawful for “any person to knowingly possess a controlled or counterfeit substance or controlled substance analog.” In general, to knowingly possess something requires that an individual must have knowledge of the controlled substance.

Circumstantial evidence can be enough to find that an individual knowingly possessed a controlled substance. For example, if a controlled substance is in a vehicle owned by the defendant, it is likely that he or she will be found to have knowingly possessed the controlled substance.

That being said, simply having a controlled substance in your possession is not enough to be convicted of a crime. In reality, you may not have been aware of the substance if it appeared in your car or your home; instead, it may have belonged to another party. Overall, if you are facing charges of drug possession, an experienced attorney can help mount an aggressive defense and ensure your rights are protected throughout each step of your case.

Contact an Attorney for Professional Help with Your Case

If you have been charged with possession of a controlled substance, you need an attorney with all of the tools to best represent you. At the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley, we combine years of experience with a passion for advocating for your rights. Our talented Rolling Meadows defense attorneys possess the requisite knowledge and skill to properly defend you. Contact us today to give you the best possible defense available to you.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs5.asp?ActID=1941&ChapterID=53

Four Commonly Asked Questions About Illinois DUI Law

May 28th, 2018 at 6:00 am

DUI charges, DUI convictions, first DUI, Illinois DUI law, Rolling Meadows DUI defense attorneyBeing faced with a driving under the influence (DUI) charge in Illinois can be scary. You don’t know what to expect or what is going to happen. Ultimately, the best way to prepare is by understanding more about your charges. 

What is a DUI?

Pursuant to Illinois law, an individual who is operating a motor vehicle with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.08 or more can be charged with a DUI. A DUI is not limited to only driving with alcohol in one’s system. A person can be charged with a DUI if he or she is intoxicated by drugs, intoxicating compounds, or methamphetamine is in his or her system.

BAC refers to the ratio of alcohol to the blood in your system. A BAC of .08 makes it illegal in Illinois to operate a motor vehicle. However, this standard only applies to individual over the age of 21, the legal drinking age. A driver under the age of 21 must have a BAC of 0. Any amount over 0 and the individual may face a DUI charge.

Will I Go to Jail?

The punishment, or sentence received, after a finding of guilt, depends on how many DUI convictions a person has on his or her record. The sentencing for a DUI can be fines and court costs, probation, jail time, or a combination of the three.

Because driving under the influence is dangerous, Illinois imposes the potential for strict penalties. Even an individual who is being charged with his or her first DUI faces the potential for jail time. Of course, while there are strict penalties associated with a DUI, it is important to remember that you have the opportunity to present a defense in your case to reduce a sentence or even get a case dismissed.

Will My License Be Suspended?

An individual convicted of a DUI does risk license suspension or revocation. Drivers under the age of 21 who are driving with any amount of alcohol, or other impairing substance, will automatically lose their license. Illinois has a zero tolerance policy for minors drinking and driving.

It is not just drivers under the age of 21 who are at risk of losing their license; anyone who is charged with a DUI risks license suspension or revocation. A driver will automatically face suspension if he or she fails to submit to or complete chemical testing for the DUI. Additionally, conviction of a DUI carries the possible sentence of license suspension.

Do I Need a Lawyer?

Yes. There is no question that a lawyer can help make the process of a DUI charge easier. Dedicated Rolling Meadows DUI defense attorney Christopher M. Cosley is experienced in DUI defense and will present the best case possible under the circumstances. Our office combines years of experience with passion to defend clients. We know what defenses are applicable to your case to help you get you the best outcome possible. Reach out to us today for assistance.

Sources:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=062500050K11-501

http://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/departments/drivers/losepriv.html

Rolling Meadows Man With Multiple DUIs Faces 30 Year Prison Sentence

May 25th, 2018 at 5:08 pm

Class X felony, DUI news, DUI penalties, multiple DUIs, Rolling Meadows defense attorneyA Rolling Meadows man with 15 driving under the influence (DUI) convictions faces 30 years in prison. The DUI convictions date all the way back to 1982. These convictions take place over 36 years and have occurred in 10 Illinois counties. 

The man’s latest DUI charge occurred in June 2017 when he struck a party bus while intoxicated and driving. For the 15 convictions, he has served 15 years, five months, and eight days in prison, with sentences ranging from one year to 7 years, according to the Daily Herald.

After the man’s most recent DUI charge, the defendant was forbidden to drive. In fact, the state of Illinois took away his license years ago because of the numerous DUI charges. Regardless, the defendant still got behind the wheel of a car and drove while intoxicated. The judge let the defendant out on bail after the 2017 DUI charge.

In March of 2018, the defendant was charged with driving without a license after driving to the scene of an accident to aid his wife. The defendant claimed his wife was in a car accident and he only drove to the scene to help her. Even with the intentions of helping his wife, the judge revoked bail.

The defendant is facing a Class X DUI felony charge. This is a charge that is reserved only for defendants who have six or more DUI convictions. The Class X felony carries a maximum prison sentence of 30 years and a potential fine of $25,000.

Illinois DUI Penalties

According to Illinois law, it is illegal to operate a motor vehicle with a blood alcohol concentration of 0.08 or more. DUI charges are divided into classes, depending on the severity of the charge. Multiple DUI charges and convictions result in harsher sentences.

DUIs can be both a misdemeanor or a felony charge. Misdemeanor charges result in the smallest punishments, and felony charge punishments are more severe.

  • Class A Misdemeanor: The first and second DUI convictions are considered Class A misdemeanors. They carry the potential for fines, short jail sentences, and license suspension.
  • Class 2 Felony: A third or fourth conviction is a Class 2 felony. Along with fines, prison time, and probation, there is a mandatory suspension of license or even lifetime revocation of driving privileges.
  • Class 1 Felony: A fifth conviction is considered a Class 1 felony. This results in both suspension of driving privileges for life and suspension of vehicle registration, in addition to potential prison time, fines, and probation.
  • Class X Felony: A Class X felony occurs after the sixth, and any subsequent DUIs. It carries the strictest penalties of up to 30 years in prison.

Contact Us Today for Help

A DUI charge is a serious matter. You need an aggressive attorney who is equipped to defend you and get the best results possible. Skilled Rolling Meadows DUI defense attorney Christopher M. Cosley is ready and able to defend you. Do not let a charge derail your future; contact us today for a consultation.

Sources:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=062500050K11-501

https://cyberdriveillinois.com/publications/pdf_publications/dsd_a118.pdf

http://www.dailyherald.com/news/20180424/man-has-15-dui-convictions-now-he-faces-30-years-in-prison

An Explanation of the Illinois Point System

May 21st, 2018 at 11:49 am

Illinois point system, moving violations, Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney, traffic offenses, traffic violationsThe Illinois Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) created a point system that tracks traffic violations that an individual accumulates on his or her driving record. Every time you receive a moving violation, a number of points are added to your driving record. After accumulating a large amount of points you risk suspension or revocation of your license. In light of this, if you are facing charges for a serious moving violation in Illinois, it is in your best interest to speak with an attorney immediately for legal assistance.

How the Points System Works

The number of points added to your driving record after a moving violation depends on the severity of the offense. For example, a charge of reckless driving on your record brings 55 points to your record. Failing to obey a stop sign adds 20 points to a driving record. Further, failing to obey a traffic signal or light carries 20 points. Points for speeding depend on the speed at which a driver is traveling, and is described below:

  • 1 to 10 miles per hour over the limit = 5 points
  • 11 to 14 miles per hour over the limit = 15 points
  • 15 to 25 miles per hour over the limit = 20 points
  • Going over 25 miles per hour = 50 points

Penalties for Points

But what do these points mean, and what is the harm in accumulating points on a license? The more points accumulated, the harsher penalty a driver can face. Accumulating points puts you at risk of having your license suspended, as highlighted below:

  • 0 to 14 points = no action taken against your license
  • 15 to 44 points = potential two-month suspension
  • 45 to 74 points = potential three-month suspension
  • 75 to 89 points = potential six-month suspension
  • 90-99 points = potential nine-month suspension
  • 100 or more points = 12-month suspension

Additionally, three or more moving violations in one 12-month period also puts you at risk for license suspension.

Points will stay on your driving record for four to five years. After this period of time, they are removed from your record and your overall point total decreases. Currently, there are no driving courses available in Illinois that can be used to decrease the number of points on your license.

Contact an Attorney for Immediate Help

If you have received a moving violation, you may not think it is a big deal. However, these charges can quickly add up points on your driving record and put you at the risk of having your license suspension. Ultimately, in many cases your best option is to fight the charges with the help of a talented Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney. Our dedicated legal team is available to assist you throughout each step of your case.

Sources:

https://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/publications/pdf_publications/dsd_dc19.pdf

http://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/departments/drivers/losepriv.html

Reckless Driving in Illinois

May 18th, 2018 at 10:00 am

reckless driving, traffic offenses, reckless driving charges, speeding, Class A misdemeanorWhile many believe reckless driving to be a minor offense, in reality it can lead to serious consequences that have lasting effects. As such, if you have been charged with reckless driving in Illinois, we ask you to reach out to us today for professional help.

What is Reckless Driving?

In Illinois, reckless driving is governed by statute 625 ILCS 5/11-305. There are two situations in which a person can be found guilty of reckless driving:

  1. A person who drives “with willful or wanton disregard for the safety of persons or property” is said to be driving recklessly; and
  2. A person who knowingly drives “a vehicle and uses an incline in a roadway, such as a railroad crossing, bridge approach, or hill, to cause the vehicle to become airborne” is driving recklessly.

Common examples of reckless driving include a person who is driving at a high rate of speed, someone who is driving erratically, or any other type of driving that might rise to the level of negligent driving. Driving erratically includes drivers who swerve in and out of lanes without notice and without the use of their turn signals.

Penalties in Illinois

If you are found to be driving recklessly in Illinois, the penalties are much higher than with a minor speeding ticket or traffic violation. Reckless driving is considered a Class A misdemeanor. A Class A misdemeanor carries up to 364 days in county jail and the potential for a fine up to $2,500. Additionally, a charge of reckless driving on your driving record also means points added to your license.

If you do not want to have a reckless driving charge on your driving record, there is the potential for an alternative penalty. Instead of the charge being added to the record, a driver can be placed under supervision. Supervision usually requires the payment of a fine, attendance and completion of Traffic Safety School, or both. However, once you use the supervision for the reckless driving charge, you can no longer be eligible for supervision for any additional reckless driving charges, or for a first DUI charge.

Additional Consequences to Reckless Driving

Upon conviction, you will receive fines, court costs, jail time, or possible supervision. There are other consequences to consider in a reckless driving charge, or any traffic-related offense:

  • License Suspension: The Illinois Point System has a three-strike rule. This means that if you receive three moving violations within a 12-month period, you may have your license suspended, although this may depend on your individual circumstances.
  • Increased Insurance Rates: With the addition of points on your license, your insurance premiums will likely go up.

We Can Help You Today

If you have been charged with reckless driving and want to hear about the options available to you, contact the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley. A dedicated Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney at our office is equipped with the knowledge and skill to explain your options and get the best results possible.

Sources:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=062500050K11-503

http://www.cookcountycourt.org/ABOUTTHECOURT/MunicipalDepartment/FirstMunicipalDistrictChicago/TrafficSection/CourtSupervision.aspx

What Happens if I Violate My Probation?

May 14th, 2018 at 6:00 am

probation, Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney, violate my probation, violating probation, Illinois criminal defensesWhen sentencing an individual upon conviction of a charge, a judge often has a variety of options available. One of the most common types of sentencing in Illinois involves placing an individual on probation.

Probation is a sentence that requires a defendant to adhere to certain supervision rules to ensure that the defendant is not committing other crimes and is being rehabilitated after his or her conviction. An individual must follow the terms of his or her probation exactly, otherwise he or she could be found in violation of his or her probation.

Of course, violating probation has consequences. If you have violated your probation, there are defenses and options available to you, and it is in your best interests to contact an attorney immediately for help.

What is Probation?

Individuals that are sentenced to probation are required to follow a set of rules established by the court. The terms of probation can vary from case to case; however, most often these rules include the following:

  • Reporting to a probation officer. This can be done either in person or over the phone, depending on the court’s ruling;
  • Refraining from using any and all illegal drugs;
  • Committing no crime;
  • Some type of restriction on weapons that one can have in his or her possession;
  • Attending counseling mandated by the court;
  • Paying all fines and court costs; and
  • Attending any scheduled court dates.

The above is not an exhaustive list of all probation terms, but is a list of the most common types of rules that must be followed. A violation of any of the above can be reported.

The court also determines the time that a defendant will be on probation. Making it through that period of time without any violations will result in release from probation and a defendant being able to move forward with his or her life. A violation of probation, however, can result in further punishment. 

If probation is violated, then a Notice of Violation of Probation will be filed with the court and will be mailed to the defendant’s last known address. A defendant must appear in court or a warrant will be placed for arrest.

There are different punishments available to the courts for violation of probation. These include letting a defendant continue with his or her probation (more common for first-time violators), lengthier probation time, or even jail time.

Contact Us Today for Help

At The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley, we know that mistakes happen. As such, a dedicated Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney at our office is ready to defend you with any applicable defenses. We are passionate about advocating for your rights and obtaining the best possible result under the circumstances. Contact us today for legal assistance.

Sources:

http://www.cookcountycourt.org/ABOUTTHECOURT/OfficeoftheChiefJudge/ProbationDepartments/ProbationforAdults/AdultProbationDepartment/FAQ.aspx

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=073000050K5-6-4

Five Questions You Should Ask a DUI Attorney

May 10th, 2018 at 8:43 am

DUI attorney, DUI charges, Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney, DUI questions, DUI trialIf you have been charged with driving under the influence (DUI) in Illinois, you need a skilled and experienced DUI attorney to handle your case. Finding the right attorney for you is important. An attorney is not one size fits all. Therefore, it is essential to ask any potential DUI attorney questions to ensure that a successful and productive attorney-client relationship will result.

Questions to Ask an Attorney

If you are facing DUI charges, make sure to ask these five questions of any attorney you contact:

  1. How much experience do you have handling DUI cases? It is important to have an attorney who has experience handling cases like yours. Experience brings about confidence and a knowledge level that can assist you in your case. Additionally, asking the results of different cases can give you an idea of what could happen in your situation.
  2. What is your caseload? It is no secret that attorneys often handle multiple cases at once; it is how they make a living. However, you want to be sure that the attorney has the time and resources available to adequately represent you.
  3. Who will actually handle my case day-to-day? The size of a law firm determines the number of attorneys employed at that firm. Additionally, a larger law firm is likely to have a larger number of cases to juggle. As a result, an attorney other than the one you hired may be the one handling your case. Or, support staff may do the heavy lifting for a case. Alternatively, at a smaller firm, the attorney you hire will likely be the one to handle your case, in addition to help from law clerks and paralegals. Knowing who will be involved in the day-to-day activities of your case is important so that you are always informed of the happenings in your case.
  4. How often do you take cases to trial? Many cases are resolved outside of the courtroom. In DUI cases, plea deals often result. Therefore, you need to be sure that your attorney can take the case all the way to trial if that is the best route.
  5. What is the cost of representation? As with any service, attorneys cost money. It is worth spending the money to make sure you have the best possible defense to your DUI charge. However, you need to be aware of the cost before you hire an attorney. There will be a fee agreement between the attorney and client to ensure that both parties know exactly what to expect in terms of fees and expenses.

We Can Help You Today

Asking these questions at the outset of an attorney-client relationship can eliminate potential problems as your case progresses. If you need assistance with your DUI case, do not hesitate to contact a talented Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney at our firm for immediate help.

Sources:

http://www.illinoiscourts.gov/SupremeCourt/Rules/Art_VIII/ArtVIII_NEW.htm

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=062500050K11-501

Why Should I Contact an Attorney if I Get a Traffic Ticket?

May 7th, 2018 at 7:00 am

Illinois traffic offenses, Rolling Meadows traffic defense attorney, traffic ticket, traffic violation, traffic violation consequencesYou may not think that a traffic ticket is a big deal, that they happen every day, and that you do not need an attorney if you receive one. This is simply not true. While there are “minor” traffic violations, like running a stop sign or improperly changing lanes, there are still consequences for even the smallest ticket. Hiring an attorney can help you avoid these consequences and keep your driving record clean.

Provide Experience  

When you fight a ticket yourself, you are relying on your own experience. If this is your first traffic ticket, or the first time that you are fighting a traffic ticket, you may not know exactly what to do. Even if this is not your first ticket, you likely do not have the same experience that an attorney has in traffic court. An attorney knows the law well and knows how to challenge the validity of a traffic ticket.

Avoid Unforeseen Consequences

Depending on the violation for which you received the ticket, the penalties can greatly vary. A traffic ticket can result in anything from a minor fee to a license suspension. In Illinois, traffic convictions result in points added to an individual’s driving record. Each violation carries a number of points. In turn, there are consequences of having a significant number of points on your record.

For traffic tickets that involve speeding, disobeying stop lights, improper lane changes, and other minor violations, points will remain on your record for four to five years. If you receive a traffic ticket that causes your license to be suspended or revoked, points will remain on your record for a minimum of seven years.

Accumulating a massive amount of points can even lead to license suspension or revocation. Suddenly, those minor speeding tickets can lead to devastating consequences.

Save Money

Yes, hiring a lawyer costs money. In some instances, you might not think that it is worth the cost to hire an attorney to fight a ticket with a low fee and low point value. However, in the long run, an attorney can save you money. For tickets with higher fees or more severe consequences, an attorney can fight to get the ticket dismissed, which would thus result in no additional fees for you or points to your driving record. Paying for an attorney at the outset might seem like an additional expense, but the rewards and benefits you could ream from the attorney’s work will outweigh the cost of hiring.

Contact Us Today for Help

If you have received a traffic ticket and are wondering if you need an attorney, contact The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley. A talented Rolling Meadows traffic defense attorney at our office will answer your questions and help you decide the best option moving forward in your case.

Sources:

http://www.ilga.gov/commission/jcar/admincode/092/092010400000200R.html

https://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/publications/pdf_publications/dsd_dc19.pdf

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