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Archive for the ‘Traffic Offenses’ Category

An Explanation of the Illinois Point System

May 21st, 2018 at 11:49 am

Illinois point system, moving violations, Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney, traffic offenses, traffic violationsThe Illinois Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) created a point system that tracks traffic violations that an individual accumulates on his or her driving record. Every time you receive a moving violation, a number of points are added to your driving record. After accumulating a large amount of points you risk suspension or revocation of your license. In light of this, if you are facing charges for a serious moving violation in Illinois, it is in your best interest to speak with an attorney immediately for legal assistance.

How the Points System Works

The number of points added to your driving record after a moving violation depends on the severity of the offense. For example, a charge of reckless driving on your record brings 55 points to your record. Failing to obey a stop sign adds 20 points to a driving record. Further, failing to obey a traffic signal or light carries 20 points. Points for speeding depend on the speed at which a driver is traveling, and is described below:

  • 1 to 10 miles per hour over the limit = 5 points
  • 11 to 14 miles per hour over the limit = 15 points
  • 15 to 25 miles per hour over the limit = 20 points
  • Going over 25 miles per hour = 50 points

Penalties for Points

But what do these points mean, and what is the harm in accumulating points on a license? The more points accumulated, the harsher penalty a driver can face. Accumulating points puts you at risk of having your license suspended, as highlighted below:

  • 0 to 14 points = no action taken against your license
  • 15 to 44 points = potential two-month suspension
  • 45 to 74 points = potential three-month suspension
  • 75 to 89 points = potential six-month suspension
  • 90-99 points = potential nine-month suspension
  • 100 or more points = 12-month suspension

Additionally, three or more moving violations in one 12-month period also puts you at risk for license suspension.

Points will stay on your driving record for four to five years. After this period of time, they are removed from your record and your overall point total decreases. Currently, there are no driving courses available in Illinois that can be used to decrease the number of points on your license.

Contact an Attorney for Immediate Help

If you have received a moving violation, you may not think it is a big deal. However, these charges can quickly add up points on your driving record and put you at the risk of having your license suspension. Ultimately, in many cases your best option is to fight the charges with the help of a talented Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney. Our dedicated legal team is available to assist you throughout each step of your case.

Sources:

https://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/publications/pdf_publications/dsd_dc19.pdf

http://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/departments/drivers/losepriv.html

Why Should I Contact an Attorney if I Get a Traffic Ticket?

May 7th, 2018 at 7:00 am

Illinois traffic offenses, Rolling Meadows traffic defense attorney, traffic ticket, traffic violation, traffic violation consequencesYou may not think that a traffic ticket is a big deal, that they happen every day, and that you do not need an attorney if you receive one. This is simply not true. While there are “minor” traffic violations, like running a stop sign or improperly changing lanes, there are still consequences for even the smallest ticket. Hiring an attorney can help you avoid these consequences and keep your driving record clean.

Provide Experience  

When you fight a ticket yourself, you are relying on your own experience. If this is your first traffic ticket, or the first time that you are fighting a traffic ticket, you may not know exactly what to do. Even if this is not your first ticket, you likely do not have the same experience that an attorney has in traffic court. An attorney knows the law well and knows how to challenge the validity of a traffic ticket.

Avoid Unforeseen Consequences

Depending on the violation for which you received the ticket, the penalties can greatly vary. A traffic ticket can result in anything from a minor fee to a license suspension. In Illinois, traffic convictions result in points added to an individual’s driving record. Each violation carries a number of points. In turn, there are consequences of having a significant number of points on your record.

For traffic tickets that involve speeding, disobeying stop lights, improper lane changes, and other minor violations, points will remain on your record for four to five years. If you receive a traffic ticket that causes your license to be suspended or revoked, points will remain on your record for a minimum of seven years.

Accumulating a massive amount of points can even lead to license suspension or revocation. Suddenly, those minor speeding tickets can lead to devastating consequences.

Save Money

Yes, hiring a lawyer costs money. In some instances, you might not think that it is worth the cost to hire an attorney to fight a ticket with a low fee and low point value. However, in the long run, an attorney can save you money. For tickets with higher fees or more severe consequences, an attorney can fight to get the ticket dismissed, which would thus result in no additional fees for you or points to your driving record. Paying for an attorney at the outset might seem like an additional expense, but the rewards and benefits you could ream from the attorney’s work will outweigh the cost of hiring.

Contact Us Today for Help

If you have received a traffic ticket and are wondering if you need an attorney, contact The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley. A talented Rolling Meadows traffic defense attorney at our office will answer your questions and help you decide the best option moving forward in your case.

Sources:

http://www.ilga.gov/commission/jcar/admincode/092/092010400000200R.html

https://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/publications/pdf_publications/dsd_dc19.pdf

When Can the Police Search My Vehicle?

April 26th, 2018 at 9:53 am

Illinois traffic offenses, Illinois traffic stops, police search, Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney, searches and seizuresThe Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution grants us the right be free from unreasonable searches and seizures. Searches are scrutinized to make sure that an individual’s constitutional rights are not infringed upon.

There are numerous cases in which a person is pulled over for a seemingly routine traffic stop, but it results in the search of the individual’s car and a potential arrest if illegal behavior or substances are found. However, a police officer does not always have the right to search your vehicle at just any traffic spot.

Ultimately, if you have been stopped by the police and placed under arrest, it is in your best interests to contact an attorney immediately. To be sure, an experienced lawyer can examine the specifics of your case and begin mounting an aggressive defense.

Valid Police Search of Your Vehicle

There are various scenarios in which a police officer has the right to search your vehicle, as described below. This is not an exhaustive list of circumstances, but these are the most common instances that arise and result in a legal search of your vehicle.

  • Consent. If you consent to a search, the police are able to search your vehicle. After you give consent, any evidence that is found during the search will be admissible in future court proceedings.
  • Probable Cause.  In order for the police to search your vehicle during a traffic stop, the police need to have probable cause that there is some sort of criminal activity happening. For example, if the police smell marijuana, they are able to search the vehicle for the substance. Police are able to bring drug sniffing dogs to smell the area around your vehicle; however, they must not excessively prolong the traffic stop.
  • Incident to an Arrest. If you are arrested, the police generally have the right to search your vehicle. Indeed, you are already being arrested for a potentially valid reason, and the police may need to conduct further investigation. The police can search for weapons and any evidence that is incident to the arrest.
  • With a Search Warrant. Since traffic stops are spur-of-the-moment events, police likely will not have a warrant to search your vehicle. However, if you are under suspicion for a crime and a judge grants a search warrant for your vehicle, a police officer will be able to search your vehicle.

If there is not a legitimate reason to pull a vehicle over, then the results of that traffic stop are not valid.  Any evidence seized or found during an illegal search is inadmissible in court.

Let Us Help You Today

If you have been charged with any criminal offense, contact The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley today. An experienced Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney at our office is equipped and ready to tackle your case and make sure you receive the justice you deserve.

Source:

http://www.uscourts.gov/about-federal-courts/educational-resources/about-educational-outreach/activity-resources/what-does-0

The Consequences of Speeding in a Construction Zone

February 23rd, 2018 at 8:22 am

Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney, speeding, traffic offenses, construction zone speeding, traffic violationsSpeeding in any area is an offense punishable by hefty fines. This is especially true in construction zones. Workers are in these areas performing road maintenance and it is important to slow down and watch for them. Plus, heavy equipment is often in use and these vehicles can cause serious damage to you and your vehicle.

Statistics show, however, the motorists are more likely to be injured or killed in construction zone accidents than workers. Between 2010 and 2014, there were an average of 27 fatalities each year. Only an average of  two of those involved workers.

Traffic violations in construction zones are no laughing matter. While most violations involve speeding, using your cell phone, or failing to yield can also get you a ticket. The speed limit in a construction zone is 45 mph. If you are given a ticket for exceeding this speed limit, you will face a $375 fine and be ordered to appear in court. The penalties get much steeper on subsequent offenses. If you are caught a second time, the fine goes up to $1,000 and you will have your license suspended for 90 days.

If you pay the ticket, you will be convicted of the crime. The conviction will go on your driving record. You will be assessed points, which will make your car insurance premiums go up. If you have too many points on your driving record, your license could be suspended.

As you can see, something as simple as going too fast in a construction zone can wreak havoc on your driving record, and your wallet. That is why it’s important to know the laws and find out what you can do if you are given a ticket.

What the Law Says

Under Illinois Law 625 ILCS 5/11-605.1, a motorist may not exceed the speed limit in a construction zone (45 mph), whether or not workers are present. Electronic speed-detecting devices may be used in construction zones.

Construction zones are defined as areas in which a government agency has posted signage advising motorists that they are approaching a construction or maintenance speed zone and that a special speed limit sign must be posted because the preexisting established speed limit is considered unsafe. The signs must be of a pre-approved design, but no flashing lights are required. The signs must adequately warn drivers that they are approaching a construction zone. They must also indicate the maximum speed limit as well as the amount of the minimum fine if the speed limit is violated.

Contact Us Today for Help

Sometimes motorists are not aware of speed limits in special areas. Maybe a construction zone is not properly marked. Perhaps no workers were present and the driver assumed that the speed limit did not apply.

Speed limit laws can be confusing. If you have received a ticket for speeding in a construction zone, The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley can help. Passionate Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney Christopher Cosley can help provide an effective defense. Reach out to us today for more information.

Sources:

http://www.idot.illinois.gov/assets/uploads/files/travel-information/pamphlets-&-brochures/workzone%20il%20fact%20sheet.pdf

http://ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/documents/062500050K11-605.1.htm

Aggravated Speeding: What You Need to Know

February 12th, 2018 at 9:21 am

aggravated speeding, aggravated speeding conviction, Illinois traffic offenses, speeding charges, Class A misdemeanorMany people drive a little fast every now and then. For instance, the car in front of you may be going too fast and you simply keep up with the flow of traffic. Or, perhaps you are running late for work and you need to speed up to get there on time. Perhaps you have a sports car and enjoy going fast.

Drivers can be pulled over for going 10, 15 and 20 mph over the speed limit. In these cases, the only punishment is a speeding ticket. You will have to pay the fine as well as take traffic school if you want to avoid insurance premium increases.

However, if you are caught going 26 mph or more above the speed limit, you will face hefty penalties. Going a few miles above the speed limit is one thing, but driving at an excessive speed is considered reckless. This is called aggravated speeding.

What is Aggravated Speeding?

Under 625 ILCS 5/11-601.5, aggravated speeding occurs when a person drives a vehicle at a speed that exceeds the speed limit by 26 mph or more. A person who drives 26-34 mph above the speed limit will face a Class B misdemeanor, while a person exceeding the speed limit by 35 mph or more will face a Class A misdemeanor. This is the most serious type of misdemeanor, and it is one step away from a felony.

Penalties for Aggravated Speeding

A Class B misdemeanor is punishable by six months in jail and a $1,500 fine. A Class A misdemeanor means up to one year in jail and a fine of up to $2,500. The penalties increase when the speeding occurs in a school or construction zone.

An aggravated speeding conviction stays on your record for seven years. Unless you have your record sealed, such a charge will stay on your criminal record for the rest of your life.

Court supervision may be an option for those facing aggravated speeding charges. If you have never faced such a charge previously, you may be able to complete court supervision and keep the charge from appearing on your driving record. The terms of your supervision may include fines, community service, and traffic school.

Let Us Help You with Your Case

Speeding is typically an infraction that involves a ticket, fines, and traffic school. However, excessive speeding can result in a criminal record. Do not let a single speeding incident affect your life.

If you are facing misdemeanor charges for a speeding ticket, you need solid legal defense to avoid fines and jail time. Get help from the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley. Talented Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney Christopher Cosley has helped many clients who have been accused of driving at a speed exceeding the speed limit by 26 mph or more. Contact us today for professional help.

Sources:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/documents/062500050K11-601.5.htm

https://www.isba.org/sections/trafficlaw/newsletter/2015/06/excessiveaggravatedspeeding

Illinois Drag Racing Laws and Consequences

February 9th, 2018 at 8:56 am

Class 4 felony, drag racing, Illinois license revocation, Illinois traffic offenses, street racingTV shows such as “Street Outlaws” make drag racing seem like fun and games. Two tricked-out cars go head to head in a race to see which one is faster. The drivers often bet money and whoever loses pays the winner.

Drag racers take their cars to the limit. They may travel at speeds exceeding 100 mph on city streets. Other drivers and pedestrians can end up seriously injured or even killed by the negligence of drag racers.

Not only is drag racing dangerous, it is also illegal. Drag racing is typically charged as a misdemeanor, but it can be a felony in some instances. 

Illinois Drag Racing Laws

Drag racing, also known as street racing, is considered illegal on all streets and highways in Illinois under Illinois law 625 ILCS 5/11-506. Drag racing is defined as the operation of at least two vehicles side by side traveling at high speeds that are trying to outdistance each other. It also involves one or more vehicles attempting to outdistance another, reach a destination before another, or prevent another vehicle from passing. Drag racing may also be referred to as a test of a driver’s stamina or physical endurance. The race may also occur over a common course.

Drag racing is considered a Class A misdemeanor, which is punishable by a $2,500 fine and up to one year in jail. It is also against the law to allow another person to use your vehicle for street racing. This is considered a Class B misdemeanor, which is punishable by a $1,500 fine and 180 days in jail.

There are situations in which drag racing can be a felony. Aggravated drag racing is defined as drag racing that causes a motor vehicle accident that leads to serious injury, disfigurement, or death. This is classified as a Class 4 felony, with punishment of 1-12 years in prison. A second offense of drag racing will also become a felony charge.

All drag racing convictions will also lead to license revocation or suspension for at least one year. To get your license reinstated, you will need to appear before a hearing office.

Contact Us Today for Professional Help

Drag racing may seem like an innocent act, especially late at night when the roads are deserted. However, drag racing can lead to crashes, serious injury, and even death. At the very least, you could face fines, jail time, and license loss.

If you are facing misdemeanor charges for drag racing or some other speeding offense, you could face jail time and fines. The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley can help reduce your charges. Skilled Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney Christopher Cosley can help you avoid serious penalties.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=062500050K11-506

How is Reckless Driving Proven in Illinois?

December 28th, 2017 at 5:38 pm

reckless driving charges, reckless driving citations, Rolling Meadows reckless driving lawyer, traffic offenses, traffic violationsReckless driving, as defined under section 625 ILCS 5/11-503 of the Illinois Code, is committed in Illinois when a driver (a) drives with a willful or wanton disregard for the safety of people or property, or (b) knowingly uses an incline, bridge approach, railway crossing, or hill to make their vehicle go airborne. Furthermore, any person who drives recklessly and as a result causes permanent disability/disfigurement or great bodily harm to another can be convicted of aggravated reckless driving. But how can it be proven that someone drove recklessly? Reckless driving cases differ from case to case; however, consider the following various approaches that are commonly used to prove acts of reckless driving in Illinois.

Approaches Commonly Used to Prove Reckless Driving

If you choose to fight a reckless driving ticket in Illinois the opposition will be forced to present evidence in court establishing that you either drove with a willful or wanton disregard for safety or that you intentionally made your vehicle go airborne. This can be proven in a variety of different ways, but before discussing these various approaches let us take a quick look at what constitutes “willful or wanton” conduct.

Willful and wanton conduct is one of those legal phrases that can be a bit hard to pin a precise definition to, but in the context of reckless driving cases it is best to think of it as conduct that is engaged in with a conscious disregard for, or a with a reckless indifference to, the potential consequences of such an action.

Proving that a driver acted with willful or wanton disregard for safety is often accomplished in reckless driving cases via one or more of the following types evidence:

  • Eyewitness Evidence: Generally the police officer who issued the reckless driving citation at issue will testify to the manner in which he or she personally witnessed the accused driving. Other eyewitnesses, perhaps someone who got into an accident with the accused, may also be called forward to testify about what they saw.
  • Video Evidence: Nowadays, many police cruisers are equipped with dashboard cams and if such a camera captured the manner in which you were driving prior to being pulled over then this video may be presented as evidence against you. Additionally, footage captured on a cell phone by a witness may also be available as people frequently film the unusual behavior of others on their smartphones these days.
  • Radar Evidence: Many reckless driving citations issued in Illinois are based solely on a driver’s speed. When this is the case the issuing police officer will have likely captured evidence of your speed on their radar gun and will present such evidence, along with proof that his or her radar gun was properly calibrated, in court.

Charged with Reckless Driving in Illinois?

If you have been charged with reckless driving in Illinois, experienced Rolling Meadows reckless driving lawyer Christopher Cosley is here to help. Mr. Cosley has extensive experience providing legal assistance to clients who have been charged with a wide array of different traffic violations and would be happy to assist you. While each case is different, Mr. Cosley is often able to help clients keep traffic offenses off the public record, avoid increased insurance rates, prevent having their driver’s license suspended, and reduce or eliminate the other various consequences commonly associated with traffic violations. To find out what The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley can do for you schedule an initial consultation at our Rolling Meadows office today.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=062500050K11-503

How Illinois’ DMV Point System Works

December 21st, 2017 at 8:19 am

DMV point system, driving record, penalty points, Rolling Meadows traffic violations lawyer, traffic violationsUnder Illinois’ DMV point system, Illinois drivers are assigned penalty points for a wide array of traffic violations. The more serious the violation the more points that the DMV will add to the driver’s record. For example, a driver who fails to obey a traffic sign will generally have 20 points added to his or her driver’s license while, on the other hand, a driver who is caught driving recklessly will often be assigned 55 points.

If you have recently accumulated a few minor traffic citations, or if you have broken a serious rule of the road, then it is important to be aware of how many points you currently have and the impact that these points can have on your ability to retain your driving privileges in Illinois.

The Impact of Points on Your Driving Record

Under Illinois’ DMV point system, a driver who receives three or more traffic citations within a 12-month period will generally have accumulated enough points on his or her record to be penalized with an administrative revocation or suspension of his or her driver’s license.

Furthermore, if your license is suspended due to having added too many points to your record during a 12-month period, then the length of the suspension is determined in part by how many points you currently have on your record and in part by whether or not the DMV has revoked or suspended your driver’s license within the past seven years.

Is it Possible to Reduce the Number of Points that I Have?

In other states a qualifying driver can reduce the number of points that have accumulated on his or her license by completing a driving safety course. Unfortunately, however, this option is not currently available to drivers in Illinois.

The only way to have points removed from your Illinois driver’s license is to wait the prescribed time period. Still, under some circumstances, Illinois drivers may be able to avoid adding points to their records in the first place by enrolling in a defensive driving course. This is because some courts in Illinois will allow a driver to take such a course in order to prevent additional points from being added to their record. Also, a local traffic violations lawyer may be able to help limit the number of points that will be added to your record by negotiating a reduced offense on your behalf.

Need Legal Advice? Contact Rolling Meadows Traffic Violations Lawyer Chris Cosley

If you have received a traffic ticket in Illinois and would like to learn more about how such a citation may impact the number of points on your record, contact dedicated Rolling Meadows traffic violations lawyer Chris Cosley today to schedule a free initial consultation. At The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley we are often able to successfully negotiate reduced offenses for our traffic violations clients. Call 847-394-3200 today.

Source:

https://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/publications/pdf_publications/dsd_dc19.pdf

Hit and Run Accidents in Illinois

September 25th, 2017 at 7:47 pm

hit and run accidents, property damage, accident scene, car accident, traffic offensesAccording to the Daily Herald, the Illinois State Police are searching for a semi truck driver who fled after hitting a 48-year-old tollway maintenance worker recently. The victim was picking up trash on the shoulder of the southbound Tri-State Tollway when the trucker allegedly hit him and sideswiped his parked vehicle. The driver did not stop and, sadly, the worker passed away from his injuries.

Fleeing the scene of an accident is illegal in Illinois and if the driver is found by the authorities, then he or she will undoubtedly find himself or herself in a world of legal trouble.

Fleeing the Scene of an Accident

Under code section 625 ILCS 5/11-401 of the Illinois Compiled Statutes, any driver who is involved in a motor vehicle accident involving personal injuries or death is legally obligated to immediately stop his or her vehicle.

Drivers are required to remain at the scene of the accident until they have fulfilled the exchange of information and rendering aid requirements outlined in code section 625 ILCS 5/11-403. Any driver who fails to abide by these requirements because they fled the scene of the accident is guilty of a “hit and run.”

Additionally, it should be noted that that is also illegal to flee the scene of an accident that results only in property damage. In other words, even if no one was injured in the accident you are still generally required to stay at the scene of the accident if the accident caused property damage. For example, code section 625 ILCS 5/11-402 states that any driver involved in an accident resulting in damage to a vehicle which is attended must immediately pull over and exchange information.

Penalties

Anyone who is arrested for a hit and run in Illinois which resulted in personal injuries or death can be subjected to chemical testing for drugs and/or alcohol and can be charged with a Class 4 felony, which is punishable by imprisonment for up to three years and a fine of up to $25,000.

However, a hit and run offender can instead by charged with a Class 2 felony (which is punishable by imprisonment for up to seven years and a fine of up to $25,000) if aggravating circumstances are present, or a Class 1 felony (punishable by imprisonment for up to 15 years and a fine of up to $25,000) if the hit and run resulted in the death of another person.

Additionally, anyone who flees the scene of an accident that resulted only in property damage to an attended vehicle can be charged with a Class A misdemeanor, which is punishable by up to one year in jail and a fine of up to $2,500.

Charged With a Traffic Offense? Contact a Local Traffic Violations Defense Lawyer

Attorney Christopher Cosley, sole attorney at The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley, is a well respected Rolling Meadows traffic violations defense attorney who has extensive experience defending clients charged with hit and runs, as well as a wide variety of other traffic offenses. Contact our office today for assistance.

Source:

http://www.dailyherald.com/news/20170918/tollway-worker-killed-in-hit-and-run-crash-along-the-tri-state

The Consequences of Driving Without Insurance in Illinois

September 18th, 2017 at 9:32 am

Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney, driving without insurance, traffic offenses, Illinois traffic offense, suspended driver's licenseIn Illinois, drivers are required by the Illinois State Legislature Vehicle Code to carry at least a minimum amount of auto insurance. Currently, in order to meet our state’s auto insurance requirements, Illinois drivers must carry at least the following amounts of liability insurance:

  • $25,000 for bodily injury per person,
  • $50,000 for bodily injury coverage per accident,
  • $20,000 for property damage,
  • $25,000 for uninsured motorist bodily injury coverage per person, and
  • $50,000 for uninsured motorist bodily injury coverage per accident.

Some people mistakenly believe that driving without adequate auto insurance in Illinois is not a big deal; however, in reality, drivers who are caught failing to meet our state’s insurance requirements suffer a number of different consequences, the most severe of which are outlined below.

Fines for Driving Without Adequate Insurance

Under code section 625 ILCS 5/3-707 of the Illinois Compiled Statutes, fines for a first offense of driving without adequate auto insurance in Illinois range from $500 to $1,000 while repeat offenders are required to pay a $1,000 fine for an ordinary violation and a $2,500 fine if they were caught after causing an accident in which someone else was injured.

Additionally, Illinois residents who are convicted of driving without adequate insurance also have to pay an additional $100 reinstatement fee to get their driving privileges back if their driver’s license is suspended because they drove without adequate insurance.

Other Consequences

Illinois residents who are caught driving without adequate insurance can also have their driver’s licenses suspended. Generally speaking, a first time offender will have his or her driver’s license suspended for three months, at the end of which the license will be reinstated if the offender is able to show proof of insurance and pay the reinstatement fee.

However, each license suspension comes with certain provisions that must be abided by or else the suspension will be extended for an additional six months. Furthermore, it should be noted that driving on a suspended licenses in Illinois is a Class A misdemeanor that is punishable by up to one year in prison and a fine of up to $2,500.

Additionally, a driver who has been caught driving without adequate auto insurance may find that when he or she is able to obtain insurance, he or she will be required to pay higher insurance rates than drivers who do not have such a blemish on their record.

Consult With a Local Attorney

If you have been caught driving without adequate insurance in Illinois, then you are likely facing fines, having your driver’s license suspended, and perhaps other additional penalties. However, the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley may be able to help.

Attorney Chris Cosley is an experienced Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney who tirelessly fights for his clients’ rights and driving privileges and helps them avoid criminal convictions whenever possible. Contact the office today.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=062500050K3-707

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