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Archive for the ‘Traffic Offenses’ Category

Can Your License be Suspended for Texting and Driving in Illinois?

June 3rd, 2019 at 5:12 pm

IL defense attorney, Illinois criminal lawyerThe last week of April was Distracted Driving Awareness Week in Illinois, and troopers all across the state participated. Over the seven-day span, they issued a total of 566 distracted driving tickets. The campaign could not have come at a better time, as drivers in Illinois are about to face much steeper penalties if they regularly text and drive.

Current Illinois Law on Texting and Driving

Currently in Illinois, it is illegal for any driver to use a handheld device while driving. This is covered under the statute 625 ILCS 5/12-610.2. This law, which is one of the stricter distracted driving laws in the country, states that no driver shall hold a cellphone or electronic device, including tablets, while they are behind the wheel of a car that is moving.

Under this law, there are only a few instances in which the use of an electronic device is legal. These include:

  • If the device is built into the car, such as a GPS;
  • When using a phone to call for emergency assistance;
  • When a cell phone is in hands-free mode, or the driver is using a headset;
  • Using a phone while parked on the shoulder of the road;
  • Using a phone on the roadway if the flow of traffic has stopped and the vehicle is in park or neutral; and
  • Using a single button on a cellphone to start or stop a call.

Anyone found using a cell phone for any reason, or in any manner, other than those described above faces penalties. Those penalties are also about to become much steeper.

Current Penalties for Texting and Driving

The penalty for texting and driving is $75 if it is the driver’s first offense. This increases to $100 for a second offense, $125 for a third offense, and $150 for a fourth and subsequent offense. In addition to these, the driver will also have to pay court costs. For example, in Rolling Meadows drivers can expect to pay anywhere from $179 to $214 in court costs. This makes the penalty for even a first offense around $300.

While these penalties are currently in effect, they are only going to last for another couple of months. After that time, drivers that are caught texting and driving will face even greater penalties.

New Penalties for Texting and Driving are On the Way

As of July 1, 2019, distracted driving will be considered a moving violation. This is different than the summary offense classification they currently fall under. While the $75 fine for a first offense will still apply, those caught in subsequent offenses will face more than just increased fines.

When the new law goes into effect this summer, those convicted of driving while distracted will have their driver’s license suspended if they have three moving violations within a period of 12 months. Those under the age of 21 face even harsher penalties under the new law. If they are convicted of two moving violations within a 24-month period, their license is suspended.

Call a Rolling Meadows Criminal Defense Lawyer and Keep Your License

In order for a driver’s license to be suspended, the driver must first be convicted of the violation. A lawyer can help drivers fight the charges and keep their license.

If you have been charged with a moving violation and now fear license suspension, a dedicated Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney at the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley can help keep it off your driving record. Call us today at 847-394-3200 to learn about the many possible defenses that are available, and how we will use them to give you your best chance of success in court. Call now, or fill out our online form for your free case evaluation.

 

Sources:

https://khqa.com/news/state/illinois-state-police-issue-over-930-citations-during-distracted-driving-week

http://ilga.gov/legislation/fulltext.asp?DocName=&SessionId=91&GA=100&DocTypeId=HB&DocNum=4846&GAID=14&LegID=110209&SpecSess=&Session=

Scott’s Law: Move Over or Possibly Lose Your License

May 30th, 2019 at 5:09 pm

IL traffic attorneyIn the first two and a half months of the year, 13 State Troopers have been hit by vehicles while working on the side of the road. In early January, one was fatally struck and killed while working the scene of an accident. The number is too high in the state, and Illinois State Police are trying to change that. With a blitz on social media, they are reminding all drivers about Scott’s Law, and what can happen if they fail to comply and reduce speed to avoid an accident.

Scott’s Law

According to 625 ILCS 5/11-907, Scott’s Law requires all motorists to move to another lane when approaching an emergency vehicle on the side of the road. The law was named after Lieutenant Scott Gillen, a firefighter with the Chicago Fire Department that lost his life after being struck by a passing vehicle while he was working the scene of an emergency. It is also sometimes called simply the “Move Over Law.”

The law applies to any vehicle that has flashing lights, a siren, or both. Police vehicles are the most common emergency vehicles seen along the side of the road, but the law also applies to ambulances, firefighters, and even tow trucks in some cases. Construction vehicles could also fall under the definition of emergency vehicle according to Scott’s Law definition. Motorists wishing to keep safe, and avoid penalties, should simply move over when approaching flashing lights ahead.

The law only states that drivers must move to another lane if the lights or siren on the emergency vehicle are activated. When changing lanes is unsafe, drivers are expected to slow down and proceed with due caution past the emergency vehicles.

Penalties for Violating Scott’s Law

Drivers found in violation of Scott’s Law will face mandatory fines. The minimum fine is $100, but that cost could increase to $10,000, depending on the nature of the violation and if the driver caused an accident when failing to move over.

However, drivers found in violation of this law will face more than just fines. They could potentially lose their license for a long time, depending on the circumstances.

If the driver caused an accident that involved property damage, the Secretary of State will revoke the driver’s license for 90 days. If the driver caused an accident resulting in injury, the driver will lose their license for 180 days. If the driver caused a fatal accident, the driver’s license is suspended for two years. They could also face other charges as well, such as involuntary manslaughter.

Contact a Rolling Meadows License Reinstatement Lawyer to Get Your License Back

If you have had your license revoked due to Scott’s Law or any other traffic violation, you need to contact a skilled Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney. At the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley, we are very familiar with the state’s system for revoking, and reinstating, licenses. We want to put that experience to work for you and help you get your license back as quickly as possible. Call us today at 847-394-3200 for a free consultation and we can begin discussing your case.

 

Source:

https://chicago.cbslocal.com/2019/03/19/illinois-police-report-troopers-struck/

Understanding Your Rights and Responsibilities During a Traffic Stop

March 28th, 2019 at 3:56 pm

Illinois traffic offenses, Illinois traffic stops, police search, Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney, searches and seizuresMany people do not have much interaction with the police. If they do, the chances are good that it is going to happen during a traffic stop. Even then, many people will only get pulled over two or three times while they are behind the wheel. When it happens, it is often very stressful. People imagine the worst as they sit in their car and watch the officer approaching.

In these cases, people are sometimes prepared to cooperate with the officer and do whatever they ask. These individuals do not understand that they have rights, and are not required to comply with everything an officer may request. Still, others may think they do not have to follow anything an officer instructs them to do at a traffic stop. These individuals may become belligerent or aggressive at a traffic stop.

So, what rights and responsibilities do people have when they are pulled over for a traffic stop?

Drivers Are Required to Pull Over

Any time a driver sees the flashing lights of a law enforcement vehicle, they must pull over as soon as it is safe to do so. In a few cases, a police officer may ask a driver to pull over, such as if the two vehicles are at a stop light, or if an officer walks up to the driver’s window while the vehicle is stopped. In either case, it is important that the driver complies with the officer’s request.

Under Section 11-204 of the Illinois Vehicle Code, failing to pull over for a police officer is considered fleeing the police, and it is illegal. Even if a driver simply takes too long to pull over, the officer may believe they are trying to evade the police. When this is the case, the driver will face penalties that are likely much more serious than the penalties they would face for the initial traffic violation.

Drivers Must Remain Calm

This is not written into Illinois law, but it can prevent the situation from escalating. When a driver can remain calm and speak politely to a police officer, it is less likely that the situation will develop into anything more. When drivers are aggressive and rude to police officers though, it could lead to further charges than they would have faced from the traffic stop alone. Police can misinterpret even small gestures such as the driver reaching for something in the vehicle. Due to this, it is always best if the driver keeps their hands visible and only gets out of the vehicle if the officer asks them to.

Drivers Are Not Required to Answer Questions

Drivers are required to provide a police officer with their driver’s license and registration if they are asked. However, they do not have to answer any questions the officer asks. The Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution allows individuals to refrain from answering questions that may incriminate them in a crime. This includes traffic stops.

Officers often ask a lot of questions during a traffic stop. They may ask a driver if they knew how fast they were going, or if the driver knows why they were pulled over. It is often advised that even when a driver feels as though they have done nothing wrong that they refrain from answering these questions. Anything a driver says can be held against them later on.

Drivers Do Not Have to Consent to a Search

Just because a driver has been pulled over does not give police officers the right to search the vehicle. Drivers can refuse this search, although officers are also given quite a bit of leniency during traffic stops. If they have reason to believe there is evidence of a crime in the vehicle, they can perform their search without the driver’s consent. For example, if an officer noticed drug paraphernalia in the vehicle, they might search the vehicle.

In order to search a vehicle, police officers must have probable cause. Due to this, drivers can ask police what they are searching for, or what probable cause they have.

Did You Get Into Trouble at a Traffic Stop? Contact a Rolling Meadows Criminal Defense Lawyer that can Help

Traffic stops may seem minor, but they can quickly become a much more serious situation. When this is the case, drivers should contact a dedicated Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer for help. If you were pulled over and it led to serious charges or you feel as though you were treated unfairly, contact the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley at 847-394-3200 today. We understand you have rights that may have been violated, and we will help make to correct that situation, ensuring those rights are upheld. Do not try to handle your case on your own. Call now for your free consultation.

 

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=062500050K11-204

What Are the Laws in Illinois for Passing a School Bus?

February 14th, 2019 at 12:10 am

IL traffic violation lawyerMany drivers may understand that they need to stop for school buses when the arm is extended and the lights are flashing. However, few know the severe penalties that accompany violating this traffic law. Every driver in Illinois should know that the law in Rolling Meadows and throughout Illinois takes this violation very seriously. Those convicted will even face a license suspension.

What the Law Says About Passing a Stopped School Bus

The laws surrounding passing a stopped school bus are included in the Illinois Vehicle Code, 625 ILCS 5/11-1414. This piece of legislation indicates that it is against the law to overtake, or pass, a school bus when the bus is stopped to load or unload students.

Drivers must come to a full stop when the bus operator has displayed the extended arm, or when the lights are flashing. Drivers can also not continue traveling until the driver has retracted the extended arm, turned the flashing lights off, or resumed motion. In some instances, such as when there is an issue with these signals, a bus operator may motion to other drivers that they can continue driving. In these instances, a driver may do so.

This law will apply in most cases of a vehicle approaching a school bus, even in parking lots. When a bus is traveling in one direction on a four-lane highway though, drivers traveling in the opposite two lanes are not required to stop.

The Illinois State Police also like to remind drivers that school buses are required to stop at railroad crossings. In this case, drivers traveling in the opposite direction of the bus are not required to stop.

Those behind the bus, however, may not pass if the bus is within 100 meters of the crossing. Due to the fact that school bus operators will need to engage their flashing lights and control arm when stopping the bus, it is safest for drivers behind the school bus to always stop and give the bus plenty of room.

Penalties for Passing a Stopped School Bus

The penalties for passing a stopped school bus illegally are also covered under the Illinois Vehicle Code, and they are harsh.

For a first offense, violators of this law will face a mandatory fine of at least $150. They will also face a mandatory suspension of three months.

Those charged with a second offense will face a mandatory fine of at least $500. These offenders will also have their license suspended for one full year. It is important those charged with a second offense understand that only offenses within the previous five years will be considered.

Court supervision is often an option for those convicted of breaking the law. Unfortunately, when a person is charged with illegally passing a stopped school bus, this is not a possibility.

Contact a Rolling Meadows Traffic Attorney and Keep Your License

Facing a license suspension is very serious. It can prevent people from going to work, attending school, and even visiting friends and family. The situation may seem hopeless, but it is not. A dedicated Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer can help individuals keep their license by building a strong defense for those charged. If you have been charged with failing to stop for a school bus, or another traffic violation, call the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley at 847-394-3200. We will review your case, fight for your rights, and do everything possible to prevent a license suspension. We offer free consultations, so contact us today.

 

Sources:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=062500050K11-1414

http://www.isp.state.il.us/docs/schoolbussafety5542.pdf

 

Traffic Fatalities on the Rise in Illinois

November 7th, 2018 at 8:29 am

Illinois defense attorneyTraffic fatalities and collisions involving serious bodily injury are on the rise in Illinois and have been for the past few years, according to WTTW Public News. To be sure, 2016 was deadlier than 2015; 2017 was deadlier than 2016; and, it looks like 2018 will be deadlier than 2017, as preliminary data from the Illinois Department of Transportation shows with still over two months to go until the final numbers are in. What does this mean for drivers who have been cited with moving violations and those who have been charged with causing bodily injury or death? Because Illinois, like most states, is seeing a rise in traffic collisions, prosecutors are more likely to bring the heaviest penalties possible on those who have allegedly violated the law. Some of the most serious Illinois traffic violations include the following:

Reckless Homicide—Drivers who cause the death of another while driving in a reckless manner or in a way that is likely to cause bodily injury or death will be charged with reckless homicide. Depending on the circumstances of the collision, defendants charged with reckless homicide can be sentenced to a maximum of 28 years in prison.

Leaving the Scene of a Crash—Under Illinois 625 ILCS 5/11-401, it is a Class 4 felony (punishable by up to three years in prison and a fine of $25,000) to leave the scene of a crash that you are involved in if the other driver was injured or killed. If the driver was killed, the defendant will also likely be charged with reckless homicide.

DUI—Driving under the influence of alcohol or controlled substances is a serious crime. Depending on how many DUIs a driver has on their record, their level of intoxication, aggravating factors, and other characteristics of the incident, a DUI can be charged as a misdemeanor with up to a year in jail, or as a felony with many years in state prison.

Reckless Driving—Reckless driving, such as going 35 miles per hour over the speed limit or getting airborne, is usually charged as a Class A misdemeanor crime, which involves a potential jail sentence, serious fine, and revoked driver’s license. However, if serious bodily injury occurs or a child or crossing guard is injured, the offense is increased to aggravated reckless driving, a Class 4 felony. Careless driving causing serious bodily injury is also a serious traffic offense in Illinois, punishable as a misdemeanor.

Contact a Rolling Meadows Attorney To Keep Out of Jail

Many people charged with moving violations believe that they will be suffer nothing more than a slap on the wrist. If you do not work with an attorney, this could not be farther from the truth. You are likely facing serious fines, points on your driver’s license, and potentially jail or prison time. We urge you to call skilled Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney Christopher M. Cosley at 847-394-3200 for legal representation today.

 

Sources:

https://news.wttw.com/2017/08/24/traffic-fatalities-illinois-rise-2017

http://apps.dot.illinois.gov/fatalcrash/snapshot.html

Three Things to Keep in Mind When Dealing With Traffic Tickets in Cook County

July 23rd, 2018 at 12:18 pm

drivers license points, Rolling Meadows traffic ticket attorneys, traffic offenses, traffic ticket, auto insurance ratesNo one likes receiving a traffic ticket. Seeing the red and blue lights in your rear-view mirror is likely not what you hope for when out on the road. Traffic tickets become a burden to those receiving them as they try to deal with the consequences and determine the next steps to take. No matter the inconvenience or the burden that is felt, traffic tickets cannot be ignored. 

Traffic Tickets Affect Your Insurance Rates

While it is true that there are traffic offenses that require paying a small fine and nothing more, this is not the case in every instance. The consequences of a traffic ticket can affect a person’s life even after paying the fine. Auto insurance rates are usually calculated by taking into consideration a person’s driving history. Traffic tickets and offenses increase the rates of your auto insurance that is required to drive in Illinois.

Traffic Tickets Add Points to You License

In Illinois, different traffic and driving offenses amount to “points” on a person’s driving record. The Illinois point system serves to keep track of the offenses one commits while driving and assign the appropriate punishments when necessary. The most extreme situation that can occur as a result of points being added to a driving record is the suspension or revocation of a license. Each violation, from moving violations to driving under the influence, amasses a certain amount of points. At a certain point, there are simply too many points on one’s driving record for the state of Illinois to continue to allow a person to drive on the road.

Traffic Tickets Can Result in More Than Just Fines

Many people think they can simply pay the fine associated with the ticket and move forward with their life. This is not true. As stated above, there are consequences far beyond the fine. Paying a fine will likely end your responsibility to the traffic ticket; however, it does not stop the consequences that extend further.

Contact Us Today for Help

If you have received a traffic ticket, an experienced traffic ticket attorney can help you mitigate the damages caused by the ticket and, in some cases, even get any charges dismissed.

Contact the dedicated Rolling Meadows traffic ticket attorney at The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley to help deal with your traffic ticket and advise you on getting the best possible outcome under the circumstances surrounding the ticket. 

Source:

https://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/publications/pdf_publications/dsd_dc19.pdf

Teen Drivers Face Stricter Driving Laws

June 29th, 2018 at 6:26 am

distracted driving, Illinois traffic offenses, Rolling Meadows traffic ticket attorney, teen drivers, teen driving lawsFew things compare in a young person’s life to finally being able to drive a car on his or her own. He or she has taken driver’s training, driven the required amount of hours with an experienced driver, and can now drive on his or her own. However, with this freedom comes an added responsibility.

Since teen drivers are so new and inexperienced, they face stricter rules and regulations in an effort to keep the driver, and those around them, safe.

Cell Phone Use

In Illinois, a driver is not permitted to be on his or her cell phone or other handheld device while driving. He or she can only make calls with a hands-free option. However, the rule is different for teen drivers. A driver under the age of 18 is not permitted to use a cell phone while driving at all, even if the device is hands-free. The only exception is in the event the driver needs to call 911 or otherwise contact emergency services or the police.

Passengers

A new driver is likely to be more susceptible to distractions while driving. The teen needs to keep his or her attention on the road so that he or she can get valuable experience driving. Illinois has passenger limits for teen drivers. For the first year after obtaining a driver’s license, a driver under the age of 18 is only allowed to have one other young person in the vehicle with him or her. A young person includes anyone under the age of 20.

In addition to limiting the number of passengers permitting in the vehicle, seat belts are enforced for every person in the vehicle. Illinois law requires all drivers to wear a seat belt while driving. However, teen drivers must also ensure that their passengers under the age of 18 wear seatbelts.

Driving Curfew

Teen drivers are not allowed to drive at all times throughout the day. On Friday and Saturday nights, drivers under the age of 18 are not permitted to drive between the hours of 11 p.m. and 6 a.m. the following morning. During the week, the curfew is 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. There are many exceptions to this curfew. Driving with a parent or guardian, driving to or from school, driving to or from work, driving in the event of an emergency, and driving for religious purposes are just some of the reasons teens can drive after curfew.

Let Us Help You Today

Teen driving laws are slightly different than adult laws. If your teen has received a traffic violation, The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley can help. Dedicated Rolling Meadows traffic ticket attorney Christopher Cosley knows that young drivers can sometimes make mistakes. Our team works hard so that one mistake does not follow your child everywhere.

Sources:

http://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/departments/drivers/traffic_safety/safetybelts.html

http://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/departments/drivers/teen_driver_safety/gdl.html

Illinois Legislature Considering Stricter Penalties for Texting Drivers

June 22nd, 2018 at 7:52 am

Illinois traffic offenses, moving violations, Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney, texting and driving, texting driversIt should come as no surprise that driving with any type of distraction is dangerous to you and everyone else on the roadways. One of the biggest distractions plaguing drivers is the number of drivers who are texting and driving. Concluded in a study by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, texting drivers can be six times more dangerous than drivers operating a vehicle under the influence of alcohol or drugs.

Because of the dangerous nature of texting and driving, and other types of distracted driving, Illinois lawmakers have imposed a bill that would make texting and driving offenses more serious, according to My Stateline. In 2014, Illinois passed a law that made first time texting and driving offenses a nonmoving violation. House Bill 4846 changes this law and makes texting and driving a moving offense. The bill passed in the House and moved to the Illinois Senate for consideration and vote. Bill 4846 was also passed by the Senate.

With the offense classification changing from a nonmoving violation to a moving violation, the penalties for such offense have increased. In Illinois, moving violations result in various fines and court costs. However, a person who received three moving violations in a 12-month period risks having his or her license suspended.

Distracted Driving in Illinois

Distracted driving is a problem across the country. In Illinois, it is not just illegal to text and drive. Any use of cell phones or electronic communications is prohibited while operating a motor vehicle. Drivers over the age of 19 are allowed to use hands-free or Bluetooth enabled devices, but should be wary of the dangers that still exist. Even without physically touching a cell phone or handheld device, a driver is likely taking his or her eyes off of the road and putting himself or herself at increased risks of accidents.

Minimize Distractions

Illinois urges drivers to minimize distractions while they drive. Consider the following tips to help prevent an accident and keep you safe:

  • Do not use a cell phone or handheld device;
  • Only operate a vehicle if you are not drowsy or overly tired;
  • Do not overly populate your vehicle; and.
  • Pull over to take a phone call or adjust the GPS

We Are Here to Help You

Even knowing the dangers associated with texting a driving, there are many drivers who still violate the law. With the harsher classification of a moving violation and the risk of a license suspension, contacting a skilled traffic attorney could benefit you immensely.

Passionate Rolling Meadows defense attorney Christopher M. Cosley is here to help you with tickets for traffic offenses, including texting and driving. Your driving record is important. As such, you need an attorney who understands that importance and fights to get you the best possible outcome under the circumstances. Contact us today for a consultation.

Sources:

http://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/departments/drivers/traffic_safety/distracted.html

http://www.mystateline.com/news/new-illinois-legislation-proposes-tougher-penalties-for-texting-and-driving/1128952249

An Explanation of the Illinois Point System

May 21st, 2018 at 11:49 am

Illinois point system, moving violations, Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney, traffic offenses, traffic violationsThe Illinois Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) created a point system that tracks traffic violations that an individual accumulates on his or her driving record. Every time you receive a moving violation, a number of points are added to your driving record. After accumulating a large amount of points you risk suspension or revocation of your license. In light of this, if you are facing charges for a serious moving violation in Illinois, it is in your best interest to speak with an attorney immediately for legal assistance.

How the Points System Works

The number of points added to your driving record after a moving violation depends on the severity of the offense. For example, a charge of reckless driving on your record brings 55 points to your record. Failing to obey a stop sign adds 20 points to a driving record. Further, failing to obey a traffic signal or light carries 20 points. Points for speeding depend on the speed at which a driver is traveling, and is described below:

  • 1 to 10 miles per hour over the limit = 5 points
  • 11 to 14 miles per hour over the limit = 15 points
  • 15 to 25 miles per hour over the limit = 20 points
  • Going over 25 miles per hour = 50 points

Penalties for Points

But what do these points mean, and what is the harm in accumulating points on a license? The more points accumulated, the harsher penalty a driver can face. Accumulating points puts you at risk of having your license suspended, as highlighted below:

  • 0 to 14 points = no action taken against your license
  • 15 to 44 points = potential two-month suspension
  • 45 to 74 points = potential three-month suspension
  • 75 to 89 points = potential six-month suspension
  • 90-99 points = potential nine-month suspension
  • 100 or more points = 12-month suspension

Additionally, three or more moving violations in one 12-month period also puts you at risk for license suspension.

Points will stay on your driving record for four to five years. After this period of time, they are removed from your record and your overall point total decreases. Currently, there are no driving courses available in Illinois that can be used to decrease the number of points on your license.

Contact an Attorney for Immediate Help

If you have received a moving violation, you may not think it is a big deal. However, these charges can quickly add up points on your driving record and put you at the risk of having your license suspension. Ultimately, in many cases your best option is to fight the charges with the help of a talented Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney. Our dedicated legal team is available to assist you throughout each step of your case.

Sources:

https://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/publications/pdf_publications/dsd_dc19.pdf

http://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/departments/drivers/losepriv.html

Why Should I Contact an Attorney if I Get a Traffic Ticket?

May 7th, 2018 at 7:00 am

Illinois traffic offenses, Rolling Meadows traffic defense attorney, traffic ticket, traffic violation, traffic violation consequencesYou may not think that a traffic ticket is a big deal, that they happen every day, and that you do not need an attorney if you receive one. This is simply not true. While there are “minor” traffic violations, like running a stop sign or improperly changing lanes, there are still consequences for even the smallest ticket. Hiring an attorney can help you avoid these consequences and keep your driving record clean.

Provide Experience  

When you fight a ticket yourself, you are relying on your own experience. If this is your first traffic ticket, or the first time that you are fighting a traffic ticket, you may not know exactly what to do. Even if this is not your first ticket, you likely do not have the same experience that an attorney has in traffic court. An attorney knows the law well and knows how to challenge the validity of a traffic ticket.

Avoid Unforeseen Consequences

Depending on the violation for which you received the ticket, the penalties can greatly vary. A traffic ticket can result in anything from a minor fee to a license suspension. In Illinois, traffic convictions result in points added to an individual’s driving record. Each violation carries a number of points. In turn, there are consequences of having a significant number of points on your record.

For traffic tickets that involve speeding, disobeying stop lights, improper lane changes, and other minor violations, points will remain on your record for four to five years. If you receive a traffic ticket that causes your license to be suspended or revoked, points will remain on your record for a minimum of seven years.

Accumulating a massive amount of points can even lead to license suspension or revocation. Suddenly, those minor speeding tickets can lead to devastating consequences.

Save Money

Yes, hiring a lawyer costs money. In some instances, you might not think that it is worth the cost to hire an attorney to fight a ticket with a low fee and low point value. However, in the long run, an attorney can save you money. For tickets with higher fees or more severe consequences, an attorney can fight to get the ticket dismissed, which would thus result in no additional fees for you or points to your driving record. Paying for an attorney at the outset might seem like an additional expense, but the rewards and benefits you could ream from the attorney’s work will outweigh the cost of hiring.

Contact Us Today for Help

If you have received a traffic ticket and are wondering if you need an attorney, contact The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley. A talented Rolling Meadows traffic defense attorney at our office will answer your questions and help you decide the best option moving forward in your case.

Sources:

http://www.ilga.gov/commission/jcar/admincode/092/092010400000200R.html

https://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/publications/pdf_publications/dsd_dc19.pdf

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