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Archive for the ‘Juvenile Crime’ Category

How Can a Juvenile Conviction Affect College Admissions?

November 28th, 2019 at 11:02 am

Illinios juvenile defense lawyer, Illinois juvenile attorneyRegardless of how stellar a student’s high school transcript is, and no matter how well they scored on the SATs, if they have any type of juvenile conviction on their record, it will make it much more difficult for them to get into college. This is just one of the consequences of being convicted of a crime, even if that conviction came in the form of adjudication in the juvenile system.

So, if your child has been adjudicated, how will it affect their chances of getting into the school of their dreams? How can you help ensure they will not feel those consequences?

Criminal History Questions on College Applications

Approximately half of all public colleges and universities will ask about a student’s criminal history on their applications for admittance. This number increases to between 60 to 80 percent for private institutions. Approximately half of all two-year community colleges will ask students about their criminal background, while most four-year colleges will conduct a full background check.

The questions asked will typically include any offenses a student committed as a juvenile. Applicants may be asked to include information about previous arrests, if they faced charges as a result, if the charges were dropped, or if they were found guilty or innocent.

It is important students are honest when answering these questions. Schools that ask these questions will typically run a background check anyway, and any prior arrests will show up on those checks. If there are discrepancies between what a student states on their application and what shows up on a background check, it will only work against the student.

How a Criminal History Affects College Admission Decisions

Not only do college and university applications ask about a student’s criminal background, but they typically ask for more detail than even employment applications. Elite schools, particularly those that are highly competitive, will likely not accept students that have a criminal record.

Other schools may deny students with a criminal background financial aid. With most students requiring this type of help, that alone could mean they will be unable to attend school. Two types of convictions or adjudications that could really hurt a student’s chance of admission or those involving violence and sex crimes. Schools around the country are trying to severely cut down on the number of these instances happening on campus and so, these crimes will likely hamper a student’s efforts the most. However, petty crimes such as vandalism and low-level marijuana offenses will likely be overlooked.

Get the Help You Need from an Illinois Criminal Defense Attorney

Unfortunately, once a student has a conviction or adjudication on their record, it is often very difficult to get rid of it. As such, the only way to help ensure these won’t affect their college or university application is to retain the help of a dedicated Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney. At the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley, we know how to prepare defenses when minors are charged with a crime so it does not affect their chances of getting into a post-secondary school or any other part of their life. If your child has been charged with a crime, call us today at 847-394-3200 for your free consultation to learn more about how our attorney can help you and your family.

 

Source:

https://www.law.northwestern.edu/legalclinic/cfjc/documents/ParentHandbook.pdf

Questioning of a Minor Without Parents or an Attorney

October 31st, 2019 at 2:17 pm

juvenile-defenseWhen your child has been arrested for an offense such as underage drinking, the situation can be terrifying. One of the most frightening aspects of this scenario for parents is learning that their child was questioned by police without an attorney, and without either parent being present. So, what does the law say in Illinois about questioning a minor? Are police officers required to ensure the parents or the child’s attorney is present?

What Is the Definition of a Minor?

Under the Juvenile Court Act of 1987, individuals 18 years old or younger are considered minors in Illinois. Even minors charged with a felony are still considered juveniles and are tried in juvenile court. However, if the court views the crime as especially heinous, a juvenile may be transferred and tried in adult court. This process typically only applies to violent offenses such as murder and rape.

How Long Can Law Enforcement Detain a Minor?

Just like with adults, if a police officer suspects a minor of committing a crime, they can take them to the police station for questioning. These questions, and the answers to them, could potentially be used as part of the investigation and considered evidence. The length of time law enforcement can detain minors depends on the age of the minor.

When the child is younger than 12 years old, law enforcement can hold them up to six hours or charge them with a crime. If the child is between the ages of 12 and 18, law enforcement can detain the minor for up to 12 hours if the alleged crime was a non-violent offense. In instances in which the alleged crime was a violent offense, law enforcement can detain a minor for up to 24 hours.

Questioning Without an Attorney or Parent Present

In most cases, law enforcement can question a minor without an attorney or their parents present. However, new legislation was signed into law in August of 2016 that could require an attorney, depending on the circumstances and the age of the minor. The most recent law requires law enforcement to:

  • Ensure an attorney is present when the child is 15 years old or younger and has been charged with a murder or sex offense
  • Read the minor a simplified version of their Miranda rights if the child is under the age of 18
  • Specifically ask the minor if they would like a lawyer present if they are under the age of 18
  • Videotape the interrogation if the minor is under the age of 18 and being charged with a felony offense or a misdemeanor sex offense

The only requirement mandated by Illinois law as it pertains to parents being present for questioning is that law enforcement must make a reasonable attempt to contact them. Unfortunately, the law does not specify what constitutes a reasonable offense, nor does it state the penalties for law enforcement when they do not comply.

Has Your Child been Charged with a Crime? Call Our Illinois Criminal Defense Attorney

If your child has been arrested, you need the help of our skilled Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney at the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley. We understand that police do not always uphold the rights of minors. When that happens, we know how to get evidence thrown out and craft a solid defense to give your child the best chance of a successful outcome. Do not navigate the juvenile justice system on your own. Call us today at 847-394-3200 for a free consultation so our attorney can review your case.

 

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=023500050K6-16

 

Should Illinois Raise the Age for Juvenile Offenders?

July 31st, 2019 at 10:19 am

IL defense attorney, Illinois juvenile law attorney, The law on juvenile delinquents in Illinois is garnering international attention. Together, the Justice Lab and Juvenile Justice Initiative are meeting with individuals from Germany and Croatia that are involved in the juvenile justice system in their own countries. Among them are prosecutors, judges, and probation leaders. Their hope is to create better strategies to deal with juvenile delinquents in Illinois so the state can see reduced recidivism rates and help enable the state’s youth for a better tomorrow. One of the main factors they are considering is raising the age of juvenile delinquents in the state.

The Current Law

Currently, anyone that is 18 or younger and charged with a crime is considered a juvenile delinquent. Historically, anyone charged with a felony was charged in adult court, regardless of their age. That law was changed in 2014 so that those under the age of 18 and charged with a felony were also considered juvenile delinquents.

However, there are some exceptions. At the court’s discretion, if the crime is considered especially heinous, a juvenile could be tried in adult court. These crimes typically include particularly violent offenses such as rape and murder.

The Proposed Law

At the meeting that involved foreign individuals in the criminal justice system, recommendations were made to raise the age of juvenile delinquents from 18 to 21. State Senator Laura Fine from Glenview has also suggested raising the age from 18 to 21 in Senate Bill 239.

Fine has seen for herself what raising the age does. After visiting Germany, a country that deems anyone under the age of 21 a delinquent, she says she has seen real progress. When introducing the bill, she stated the many benefits the new law would have, and why it is so important in today’s world.

Benefits of the Proposed Law

One argument Fine gave for increasing the age was that those between the ages of 18 to 25 had the highest rate of recidivism. That is, they are the individuals most likely to commit another crime upon their release. This is due to the fact that this younger age group is not as fully developed as older adults and as so, they should not be treated as such.

Fine also pointed to the fact that youths are dealing with so much more today than they were when the law was originally created. They are on social media all the time, are open to new, and much more damaging, forms of bullying, and regularly participate in active-shooter drills at school, leaving them in fear much of the time.

This pressure is too much for many youths to handle. That is the reason so many minors are simply circulated through the justice system time and time again. This is not only extremely damaging to the youth that is going through it, but also to future victims. By placing older youths in the juvenile system rather than trying them as adults, the hope is that they will get the rehabilitation they need instead of strictly punishment.

Was Your Child Charged with a Crime? Contact a Rolling Meadows Criminal Defense Attorney

There is no doubt that if Fine’s bill passes, it will do a tremendous amount of good for juveniles in Illinois, and the state as a whole. However, we are not there yet. Today, if your child is charged with a crime, they could still be tried as an adult, which will have an incredibly negative impact on the rest of their lives. That does not have to happen.

If your child has been charged with a crime, contact a skilled Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer. At the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley, we will work hard to keep your child in the juvenile justice system and get them the rehabilitation they need so they can live the rest of their life without a criminal record. Call us at 847-394-3200 or fill out our online for your free consultation and learn more about how we can help your family.

 

Source:

https://www.publicnewsservice.org/2019-06-05/juvenile-justice/an-international-view-of-justice-for-illinois-young-adults/a66696-1

 

Can Juvenile Records Be Expunged in Illinois?

December 19th, 2018 at 2:19 pm

IL juvenile defense lawyerA criminal record can be devastating for a minor. It can prevent them from obtaining future employment, and could even result in them losing a scholarship or not getting accepted to a certain university or college. For this reason, it is very important that juveniles charged or convicted of a crime speak to a Rolling Meadows juvenile crime lawyer that can help them get their record expunged.

What Is an Expungement?

When a criminal record is expunged, it is removed from all public government files and destroyed. Any information related to the criminal record including fingerprints, reports of the arrest, photographs, and any other evidence will also be destroyed. Essentially, it provides the juvenile with a clean slate and after expungement, they will no longer have a criminal record.

Often the terms ‘expungement’ and ‘sealed records’ are used interchangeably. However, it is important that minors, and their parents, understand that these are two different terms that have different meanings. When a record is sealed, it is still available and can be seen by certain individuals. Expunging a record means it is as though the record never existed.

When Can Juvenile Records Be Expunged?

Almost any case that was tried in juvenile court can be expunged, with two exceptions. Those exceptions are when the crime involved first-degree murder or was a felony sex offense. The instances in which a juvenile record may be expunged include:

  • When the minor was arrested but not charged with committing a crime;
  • The minor was found not guilty of a crime, and a petition of delinquency was not filed;
  • A minor was charged, but those charges were later dismissed;
  • The minor adequately completed supervision; or
  • The minor was found guilty of a Class B or Class C misdemeanor.

Minors found guilty of a crime may still have their record expunged in certain cases. There are, however, certain crimes that are considered to be disqualifying. When one of those disqualifying crimes has been committed, the record may not be expunged. Aggravated battery, robbery, and aggravated unlawful use of a weapon are a few examples of crimes that could disqualify a record from being expunged.

Juvenile Records that Cannot Be Expunged

The Office of the State Appellate Defender outlines when juvenile criminal records may not be expunged. The first is when a juvenile case began in juvenile court, but was moved to adult court.

Certain offenses are also not eligible to be expunged from juvenile records. These include driving under the influence, first-degree murder, and any sex offenses that would be considered felonies if an adult committed them.

How to Apply for an Expungement

In order to obtain an expungement, a petition needs to be filed with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Cook County. This is particularly necessary when a record is not eligible for automatic expungement.

Anyone that wishes to have a criminal record expunged for themselves or their child should speak to a juvenile crime lawyer in Rolling Meadows. The Office of the State Appellate Defender states it is not necessary to use an attorney to get an expungement, however, having a lawyer can be of great help. An attorney can advise on whether or not an expungement is possible. They can also ensure that paperwork is filed correctly so that the expungement is obtained as soon as possible.

Contact a Rolling Meadows Juvenile Crime Lawyer Today

If you or your child has a juvenile criminal record you would like to get expunged, contact a passionate Rolling Meadows juvenile defense attorney at our office today at 847-394-3200. One mistake should not follow you around for the rest of your life, and there are steps that can be taken to ensure it does not. Call us today to schedule your free consultation so we can start reviewing your case as soon as possible.

 

Source:

https://www2.illinois.gov/osad/Expungement/Documents/Juvenile%20Exp%20Guide/JuvenileExpungementGuide.pdf

Penalties for Teenage Breaking and Entering

October 19th, 2018 at 9:00 am

juvenileBreaking and entering has long been a sort of game for teenagers looking for a thrill. For example, teens in Colorado recently broke into a Colorado home, threw a party, and recorded it on Snapchat. Teens and younger adolescents may dare or encourage one another to break into abandoned homes, which may not actually be abandoned, schools, and other structures. However, breaking and entering, which is called burglary whether there was an intent to steal something or not, is a felony crime.

Residential Burglary and Possession of Burglary Tools

Under Illinois statute 720 ILCS 5/19-3, the elements of residential burglary include the following:

  • Knowingly entering a residence (including a car, RV, boat, railroad car, or other structure) without permission;
  • Entering or remaining in a residence  for the purpose of committing a theft or other felony; or
  • Misrepresenting oneself in order to gain entrance to a residence for the purpose of committing a theft or other felony.

Defendants facing burglary charges may be put behind bars for three to seven years. However, residential burglary is a first-degree felony if the structure entered was a school, place of worship, or daycare facility, punishable by four to 15 years in prison. Teens 18 and older will be tried as adults. Furthermore, if anyone was killed, even accidentally, during breaking and entering (burglary), the defendant faces a first-degree murder charge.

Possession of burglary tools under Illinois statute 720 ILCS 5/19 2 is a Class 4 felony, punishable by one to three years in prison, and involves the following elements:

  • Possession of tools suitable for breaking and entering a structure, car, or watercraft (including lock picking tools, explosives, or other devices); and
  • Intent to break into breaking into a place and commit a felony or theft.

Juvenile Penalties for Breaking and Entering

Unlike adult sentencing, there are generally no strict guidelines for punishing minors in juvenile court. As such, a judge has much more leeway in determining an appropriate punishment. The court may look at the juvenile’s age, the seriousness of the crime committed, their criminal history if any, whether or not they are enrolled in school, their grades, their home life, their general attitude regarding the crime or remorse, and many other personal characteristics. Penalties for breaking and entering include potential fines, incarceration in a juvenile detention facility, probation, counseling, and restitution.

Call a Rolling Meadows Criminal Defense Attorney Today

If your child is 18 or older, he or she will be tried as an adult, and if found guilty, awarded a felony record and potentially years in prison. If he or she is a minor under 18 years of age, they will most likely be tried in juvenile court. However, if serious injury, aggravated battery, or death occurred as a result of the burglary, and your child is 16 or older, they will be tried in adult court. You need to take action to protect your child’s future whether they are 10, 14, or 18. Call dedicated Rolling Meadows juvenile crimes attorney Christopher M. Cosley today at 847-394-3200.

 

Source:

https://abc7ny.com/teens-break-into-home-for-party-record-snapchat-video/2548147/

Types of Juvenile Crimes

February 26th, 2018 at 7:00 am

juvenile courts, juvenile crimes, juvenile law, Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney, violent offensesAdults are not the only ones who break the law. Teens commit many crimes as well. Those under the age of 17, however, typically cannot be held responsible for the crimes they commit. The area of juvenile law applies to teens and is focused more on rehabilitation rather than punishment—prison time and hefty fines are not always appropriate forms of punishment for juveniles.

There are many sentencing options for juvenile courts. They are typically grouped into two types: incarceration and non-incarceration. Incarceration does not have to involve jail, although it sometimes does—particularly if the minor committed a felony. Other forms of incarceration include house arrest, placement in a foster home, and juvenile hall.

For minor crimes, a teen may be able to avoid incarceration. Non-incarceration punishment options include verbal warnings, fines, community service, counseling, and probation.

Most Common Offenses Among Teens

Teens have the ability to commit the same types of crimes as adults. They are even capable of committing murder and other serious or violent offenses. However, the most common criminal offenses are the following:

  • Theft – This includes shoplifting, stealing bikes, and stealing from backpacks.
  • Burglary – This includes entering a home or building with an intent to steal something.
  • Vandalism – This includes graffiti, drawing on walls, keying cars, and cutting tires.
  • Drug and alcohol offenses – This includes the purchase and possession of alcohol or marijuana.
  • Tobacco use  This includes purchasing tobacco and smoking or chewing it at school or other public place.
  • Weapons possession This includes possession of a gun (even a BB gun), knives, brass knuckles, nunchucks, and pepper spray.
  • Disorderly conduct This includes nudity in public (such as flashing or mooning), cursing at an adult and starting fights in public.
  • Assault and battery This includes verbal bullying or physical altercation such as pushing or hitting another person.
  • Traffic violations These offenses include speeding, running red lights, and not wearing a seat belt.
  • Trespassing  This includes entering a vacant building and using another person’s land without permission.
  • Fraud This includes sending spam emails in an attempt to obtain personal information, writing bad checks, and impersonating another person for personal gain.
  • False reporting This includes pulling a fire alarm when no fire is present, calling 911 for no reason, and making bomb threats.
  • Unauthorized use of a motor vehicle This includes driving without a license or using someone else’s car without their permission.

Need Legal Advice? Contact a Local Criminal Defense Lawyer

Teens who commit crimes deserve second chances. They have their entire lives in front of them, and forcing them to spend most of their adulthood in jail is unfair. As a parent, you need to ensure your child’s legal rights are protected.  

If your child is facing criminal charges, The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley can defend his or her case. Skilled Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney Christopher Cosley will do what it takes to avoid a conviction or find alternative punishment. Reach out to our office for help today.

Source:

http://www.globalyouthjustice.org/TOP_25_CRIMES.html

Juveniles Caught With Fake IDs in Illinois: The Consequences

November 17th, 2017 at 4:10 pm

criminal defense cases, fake ID laws, juvenile crime, Rolling Meadows juvenile charges defense lawyers, unlawful possessionAs the legal drinking age in Illinois is 21, it is not all that uncommon for underage juveniles to be caught with fake IDs. While such an offense may not seem like more than a youthful indiscretion, it is important to note that unlawful possession of fictitious identification in Illinois can be charged as a felony offense under some circumstances.

Unlawful Possession of Fictitious Identification

Under code section 15 ILCS 335/14A, it is a felony offense for any person in Illinois to:

  • Knowingly possess or display a fake or illegally altered ID card;
  • Knowingly possess or display a fake or illegally altered ID card in order to obtain a bank account, credit, a debit card, or a credit card;
  • Knowingly possess a fake or illegally altered ID card in order to commit credit card fraud, theft, or any other illegal action;
  • Knowingly possess a fake or illegally altered ID card in order to commit a violation which can be punished by imprisonment for one year or more;
  • Knowingly possess a fake or illegally altered ID card while also in unauthorized possession of a document or device that is capable of defrauding another; 
  • Knowingly possess a fake or illegally altered ID card while intending to use said card in order to acquire another source of identification;
  • Knowingly issue (or assist another in issuing) a fake ID card;
  • Knowingly change, or attempt to change, an ID card;
  • Knowingly possess, manufacture, provide, or transfer an identification document (either real or fake) in order to obtain a fake ID card;
  • Apply for a fake ID card for another person; or
  • Retain someone to apply for a fake ID card.

Offenders convicted of unlawfully possessing fictitious identification in Illinois can be found guilty of a:

  • Class 4 felony – If the offender knowingly possessed or displayed a fake or illegally altered ID card, applied for a fake ID card for another, or had someone apply for a fake ID card for him or her. However, if the offender is convicted of a second or subsequent violation then he or she is guilty of a Class 3 felony.
  • Class 4 felony – If the offender had two or more fake or illegally altered ID cards in his or her possession at the time he or she was arrested.

Additional Potential Consequences

In addition to the consequences outlined above, individuals who violate our state’s fake ID laws can find themselves in a heap of trouble. For example, the State of Illinois has the power to revoke or suspend an individual’s driving privileges if he or she is caught violating our state’s fake ID laws even if the individual is never convicted. Furthermore, anyone caught engaging in one or more of the following acts can be convicted of a Class A misdemeanor (punishable by a fine or up to $2,500 and up to a year in jail):

  • Knowingly allowing someone else to use his or her ID,
  • Using someone else’s ID, or
  • Altering a state ID or driver’s license.

Let Us Help You Today

If you or your child has been charged with unlawful possession of fictitious identification or a related offense in Illinois, contact the experienced Rolling Meadows juvenile charges defense lawyers of The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley without delay. Our firm handles a wide array of criminal defense cases throughout Illinois and has stellar references. Do not hesitate to contact us today for help.

Source:

https://www.illinois.gov/ilcc/All%20documents%20site%20wide/Education/Under%2021/Materials/MinorFakeIdEnglish.pdf

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=001503350K14A

Juvenile Crime Law: Give Our Kids a Chance in 2017

May 22nd, 2017 at 8:50 am

juvenile crime law, juvenile criminal offenses-Rolling Meadows Criminal Law AttorneyWith the signing of State Bill 2777, it is now prohibited for a juvenile to be committed to a juvenile detention center for a crime that is not a felony, and even for some nonviolent felonies. This change in the law comes as a sweeping initiative is taking hold in the Illinois legislature, moving away from the tough on crime policies that have caused an exploding prison population in Illinois.

“There has been a recognition that our system of justice needs to be more just and less retribution-focused,” said Rep. Ron Sandack, R-Downers Grove.” This is coming as bi-partisan efforts to keep our children out of the prison system have begun to take hold in our criminal justice system.

Which Juvenile Crimes Does This New Law Effect?

The new law effects juveniles who have been convicted of misdemeanor crimes. Misdemeanor crimes include misdemeanor theft, misdemeanor possession of marijuana, simple battery, and trespassing.   

Why Now?

Illinois lawmakers have been grappling with the rising population of juveniles who go from juvenile detention centers directly into adult detention centers. Juveniles who are sentenced for misdemeanor crimes, and find themselves becoming adult offenders without having a meaningful opportunity to rejoin society, have a high societal cost and an extremely heavy financial burden on the state of Illinois.

Lawmakers have anticipated that the new change in the law will save approximately $4.5 million dollars that the state of Illinois must pay to house the 110 kids that are admitted to juvenile detention centers, on average, every year.

Is That the Only Juvenile Criminal Law That Has Changed?

House Bill 6291 is another law that changed in 2017. This change in the law prohibits a juvenile from being committed to the Department of Juvenile Justice for certain controlled substance violations unless it is his or her third or subsequent judicial finding of a probation violation.

Another goal of this bill is to change the minimum probation period for youths who have been adjudicated delinquent. “We need to approach our criminal justice system with more compassion,” said Illinois Governor Rauner.” It is time the state starts treating our youth who struggle with addiction with various treatment programs instead of sending them to jail.

Do I Still Need a Lawyer?

Even with the changes in the law, it is still important to have dedicated and experienced legal counsel on your side when you have been arrested and charged with a crime. Contact your experienced Rolling Meadows criminal law attorney at the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley at 847-394-3200.

Sources:

https://www.riverbender.com/articles/details/rauner-signs-bills-to-further-reforms-to-illinois-criminal-justice-system-14779.cfm#.WP_EqtLytqM

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/politics/ct-illinois-juvenile-justice-new-laws-met-20151230-story.html

When Juveniles Commit a Theft That Turns Into Residential Burglary

April 28th, 2017 at 1:42 pm

residential burglary, Rolling Meadows Juvenile Crime LawyerAs the weather begins to warm up, many homeowners in the area will open their doors and garages to allow the sunshine in and to air out their homes after a long, cold winter. In suburbia, it is not uncommon for people to leave their garage doors open during the daytime, and to even leave them open without supervision.

While normally such behavior should be safe, open doors can be inviting, especially to juveniles. Take, for example, a group of teenagers who see an open and apparently unguarded garage and enter in search for beer. One teen in the group might dare another to go steal the beer or something else from the open garage. Under pressure from his or her friends, the unfortunate teen will enter the garage and commit the theft.

When Theft Turns Into Residential Burglary

The teen who steals the beer from the garage, however, has done more than merely commit a theft. Because the teen entered the garage of another without permission, and with the intent to steal the beer, the criminal charges the teen can face will likely be upgraded to residential burglary. Why is the upcharge so bad for a teen? Residential burglary is a felony level offense, even if the offender is only a juvenile.

While someone who is under 18 years of age will likely face juvenile charges for his or her theft of the beer from someone’s garage, it is still a serious matter. When it comes to juveniles who commit offenses, the courts have a lot of discretion in terms of how the juvenile offender should be punished. The potential punishments that a convicted juvenile delinquent could face include:

  • Having to pay a fine;
  • Having to pay restitutions to the victim of the residential burglary;
  • Having to attend mandatory counseling sessions or therapy sessions;
  • Being put on probation, which means that the juvenile avoids detention (the juvenile equivalent of jail), but is required to comply with a number of terms, i.e., rules, that are part of his or her probation;
  • Being placed in juvenile detention, weekend detentions, or mandatory community service-type work programs.

Juveniles sometimes make poor decisions and exercise bad judgement. They also can make mistakes about the criminality of the things they do. First time juvenile delinquents are often treated with more leniency by the court than repeat offenders. Any young person facing theft of burglary charges needs to consult with a juvenile offenses lawyer immediately.

Juvenile Delinquents Need an Experienced Criminal Defense Lawyer

A juvenile charged with a crime needs a strong criminal defense lawyer fighting for his or her rights. Contact an experienced Rolling Meadows juvenile crime lawyer for assistance with your case.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=072000050K19-3

Frightening Facts About Juveniles and Crime in Illinois

October 18th, 2016 at 7:00 am

juveniles and crime, Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorneyTeens and young adults sometimes make poor decisions. As a result, they may end up being charged with a crime. Teens may even be involved in criminal activities on a regular basis when they are caught, or they may be first-time offenders. If your teen is involved in a crime, speaking with a skilled criminal defense attorney is essential.

Teens, Crime, and the Statistics

Many crimes that are committed by juveniles occur while they are at school. For instance, according to a 2014 National Report on Juvenile Offenders produced by the U.S. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, some frightening statistics about juveniles and crime while in school in Illinois include:

  • 3.9 percent of juveniles questioned reported having taken a weapon to school with them within the past 30 days prior to being surveyed;
  • 7.6 percent reported having been threatened in school by a weapon possessed by a classmate;
  • 3.3 percent of juveniles reported that they had used alcohol while on school property within the past 30 days;
  • 4.7 percent of juveniles reported using marijuana while at school; and
  • 27.3 percent reported being offered illegal drugs or alcohol while at school.

These statistics show that young people are exposed to a lot of opportunities to engage in criminal activities, even while they are in school. A number of other crimes often occur on school grounds as well, such as assaults, batteries, school-ground fights, thefts, bullying, and harassment.

When Teens Get Into Trouble At School

Teens are subjected to peer pressure, and because they are not good at exercising sound judgement, good kids can make bad choices—they are influenced by their peers. A lot of kids make bad choices and commit crimes because they want to appear cool to their friends, or are going through tough issues at home and are acting out. There are several reasons why teens make the decisions that they do, and they often do not have the foresight to understand the consequences of their actions.

When a teen gets into criminal trouble while in school, there are many consequences. The teen could be suspended or expelled from the school, and criminal charges could be pressed against the teen. If convicted, the teen could have a criminal record. These are all very serious consequences that can have a long-lasting impact on a young person’s life. The teen could have trouble finishing school, could develop a reputation as a troublemaker within the school, or could have difficulty getting accepted to college.

Contact Us Today for Help

Do not let your teen’s misguided mistake turn into a lifetime of harsh consequences. One youthful mistake could haunt your teen for many years to come in the future. If your child has been charged with a crime, it is important to diligently and aggressively fight the charges. Do not hesitate to contact a Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney immediately. Our office can help you today. Call 847-394-3200.

Source:

http://www.ojjdp.gov/ojstatbb/nr2014/downloads/NR2014.pdf

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