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What Is Aggravated Speeding in Rolling Meadows?

January 8th, 2019 at 9:54 pm

IL defense lawyerFor most drivers in Rolling Meadows, a speeding ticket is little more than an annoyance. These tickets often do not result in anything more than a fine. There are instances when a speeding ticket can result in much more. This is when the driver is charged with aggravated speeding. An aggravated speeding charge is very serious. Anyone charged with this crime should speak to a criminal defense lawyer in Rolling Meadows right away.

What Is Aggravated Speeding?

According to Illinois statute 625 ILCS 5/11-601.5, aggravated speeding consists of driving 26 miles per hour, or more, over the posted speed limit. At one time, traveling at these speeds was considered the same as a minor speeding ticket. However, due to the fact that driving at such speeds poses an increased threat to public safety, lawmakers in the state increased the penalties for aggravated speeding in 2011.

Aggravated speeding is still considered to be a misdemeanor offense. When a driver is traveling between 26 and 34 miles per hour over the posted speed limit, they can be charged with a Class B misdemeanor. The charge becomes more serious when a driver is traveling over 35 miles per hour the posted speed limit. In these cases, drivers can be charged with a Class A misdemeanor.

Penalties for Aggravated Speeding

When a driver is charged with aggravated speeding, the penalties are much more severe than simply being charged with lesser speeding offenses. In most cases, the driver will have their driver’s license suspended temporarily. In the worst case scenarios, a driver can actually have their license revoked, which means they are permanently prohibited from driving in the state.

Fines and jail time are also real possibilities when a person has been charged with aggravated speeding. Fines can be up to $2,500, in addition to court costs, and a person may be sentenced to spend up to one year in jail.

Court Supervision for Aggravated Speeding Charges

Court supervision is a more desirable penalty for aggravated speeding. Whether or not court supervision is sentenced will be left to the judge’s discretion.

Court supervision requires a person charged with a crime to comply with certain conditions that the judge will specify. These can include community service, attending traffic school, reporting to the court or other person designated by the court, or more. Illinois statute 730 ILCS 5/5-6-3.1 outlines the full definition and requirements of court supervision within the state.

Court supervision will typically last up to two years. When determining whether or not court supervision is an option, a judge will likely determine whether or not someone is likely to re-offend, if the accused is a threat to the public, and will deem whether or not court supervision is a preferred penalty over other possibilities.

Court supervision can be considered a deferred dismissal of the charge. Upon adequate completion, all of the charges will be dismissed and it will not result in a conviction.

Get the Help You Need from a Rolling Meadows Criminal Defense Lawyer

Aggravated speeding is considered to be a very serious crime in Rolling Meadows. If convicted, one could face serious penalties such as spending up to one year in jail. While a judge may offer court supervision as a penalty, it is not a guarantee.

If you have been charged with aggravated speeding, contact a dedicated Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer as soon as possible at 847-394-3200 for a free consultation. An attorney will fight for your rights in court and is your best chance at having the charges dismissed, or being sentenced to court supervision. Aggravated speeding is a serious charge and one you certainly do not want to fight on your own.

Sources:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/documents/062500050K11-601.5.htm

http://ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=073000050K5-6-3.1

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Written by Staff Writer

January 8th, 2019 at 9:54 pm

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