Search
Facebook Twitter Google Our Blog
The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley
24 HOUR ANSWERING | 847-394-3200
SERVICE

1855 Rohlwing Road, Suite D, Rolling Meadows, IL 60008

24 HOUR ANSWERING SERVICE

Archive for the ‘penalties for battery’ tag

What Are the Penalties for Battery in Illinois?

November 20th, 2017 at 9:32 am

aggravated battery, aggravated domestic battery, battery, domestic battery, penalties for batteryBattery, unlawfully and knowingly causing physical bodily harm to someone else or making physical contact of a provoking or insulting nature with the person of another, is a serious criminal offense in the state of Illinois. Moreover, battery is punished in a variety of different ways—the severity of which depends on the circumstances surrounding the battery and the type of battery with which the offender is charged. 

Battery & Aggravated Battery

Battery as defined in code section 720 ILCS 5/12-3 is a Class A misdemeanor that is punishable by up to one year in prison and a fine of up to $2,500. However, in some instances, those convicted of battery will instead be sentenced to probation rather than imprisonment and be required to attend counseling and/or engage in a set amount of community service.

Additionally, if the offender is convicted of aggravated battery under code section 720 ILCS 5/12-3.05, then he or she can be punished in any of the following ways, depending on the severity of the aggravating factors present:

  • Class 3 felony: Punishable by up to five years in prison and a $25,000 fine;
  • Class 2 felony: Punishable by up to seven years in prison and a $25,000 fine;
  • Class 1 felony: Punishable by up to 15 years in prison and a $25,000 fine; and
  • Class X felony: Punishable by up to 60 years in prison and a $25,000 fine.

Battery of an Unborn Child & Aggravated Battery of an Unborn Child

An offender who knowingly and without legal justification causes physical harm to an unborn child and is convicted of battery of an unborn child in Illinois under code section 720 ILCS 5/12-3.1, is guilty of a Class A misdemeanor, and can be sentenced to serve up to one year in prison and to pay a fine of up to $2,5000.

However, if the offender knowingly caused great bodily harm to the unborn child, then he/ or she can be convicted of aggravated battery of an unborn child, which is a Class 2 felony, and sentenced to serve up seven years in prison and pay up to $25,000 in fines.

Domestic Battery & Aggravated Domestic Battery

Domestic battery occurs in Illinois when an individual knowingly and without legal justification physically harms or makes physical contact of a provoking or offensive nature with a household or family member and is generally classified as a Class A misdemeanor. Domestic battery is punishable by up to one year in prison and a fine of up to $2,500. 720 ILCS 5/12-3.2.

However, domestic battery can constitute a Class 4 felony under some circumstances—for example, if the offender was previously convicted of domestic battery, violating a protective order, or a serious violent crime such as first degree murder, etc.—and is punishable by imprisonment for up to one year. Additionally, aggravated domestic battery in Illinois is a Class 2 felony that is punishable by up to seven years in prison and a fine of up to $25,000.

Charged with Battery? Contact a Local Criminal Defense Lawyer Today

No matter which type of battery you have been charged with in Illinois, it is important that you take the allegations that have been levied against you seriously and consult with a skilled Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer about your legal options without delay. At The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley, we offer a free initial consultation to prospective clients and would be happy to meet with you.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs4.asp?ActID=1876&ChapterID=53&SeqEnd=23000000&SeqStart=21100000

Back to Top Back to Top Back to Top