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Archive for the ‘juvenile crime’ tag

Juveniles Caught With Fake IDs in Illinois: The Consequences

November 17th, 2017 at 4:10 pm

criminal defense cases, fake ID laws, juvenile crime, Rolling Meadows juvenile charges defense lawyers, unlawful possessionAs the legal drinking age in Illinois is 21, it is not all that uncommon for underage juveniles to be caught with fake IDs. While such an offense may not seem like more than a youthful indiscretion, it is important to note that unlawful possession of fictitious identification in Illinois can be charged as a felony offense under some circumstances.

Unlawful Possession of Fictitious Identification

Under code section 15 ILCS 335/14A, it is a felony offense for any person in Illinois to:

  • Knowingly possess or display a fake or illegally altered ID card;
  • Knowingly possess or display a fake or illegally altered ID card in order to obtain a bank account, credit, a debit card, or a credit card;
  • Knowingly possess a fake or illegally altered ID card in order to commit credit card fraud, theft, or any other illegal action;
  • Knowingly possess a fake or illegally altered ID card in order to commit a violation which can be punished by imprisonment for one year or more;
  • Knowingly possess a fake or illegally altered ID card while also in unauthorized possession of a document or device that is capable of defrauding another; 
  • Knowingly possess a fake or illegally altered ID card while intending to use said card in order to acquire another source of identification;
  • Knowingly issue (or assist another in issuing) a fake ID card;
  • Knowingly change, or attempt to change, an ID card;
  • Knowingly possess, manufacture, provide, or transfer an identification document (either real or fake) in order to obtain a fake ID card;
  • Apply for a fake ID card for another person; or
  • Retain someone to apply for a fake ID card.

Offenders convicted of unlawfully possessing fictitious identification in Illinois can be found guilty of a:

  • Class 4 felony – If the offender knowingly possessed or displayed a fake or illegally altered ID card, applied for a fake ID card for another, or had someone apply for a fake ID card for him or her. However, if the offender is convicted of a second or subsequent violation then he or she is guilty of a Class 3 felony.
  • Class 4 felony – If the offender had two or more fake or illegally altered ID cards in his or her possession at the time he or she was arrested.

Additional Potential Consequences

In addition to the consequences outlined above, individuals who violate our state’s fake ID laws can find themselves in a heap of trouble. For example, the State of Illinois has the power to revoke or suspend an individual’s driving privileges if he or she is caught violating our state’s fake ID laws even if the individual is never convicted. Furthermore, anyone caught engaging in one or more of the following acts can be convicted of a Class A misdemeanor (punishable by a fine or up to $2,500 and up to a year in jail):

  • Knowingly allowing someone else to use his or her ID,
  • Using someone else’s ID, or
  • Altering a state ID or driver’s license.

Let Us Help You Today

If you or your child has been charged with unlawful possession of fictitious identification or a related offense in Illinois, contact the experienced Rolling Meadows juvenile charges defense lawyers of The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley without delay. Our firm handles a wide array of criminal defense cases throughout Illinois and has stellar references. Do not hesitate to contact us today for help.

Source:

https://www.illinois.gov/ilcc/All%20documents%20site%20wide/Education/Under%2021/Materials/MinorFakeIdEnglish.pdf

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=001503350K14A

Can Acts of Disorderly Conduct be Committed Online?

November 13th, 2017 at 9:59 am

disorderly conduct, Internet crime, juvenile crime, online disorderly conduct, Rolling Meadows disorderly conduct defense attorneysU.S. News recently reported that a Chicago middle schooler was charged with disorderly conduct and a hate crime after posting a video on social media. Allegedly, the video in question was threatening in nature and was removed from the Internet after a parent reported it to the Marlowe Middle School and the police got involved.

When we think of acts of disorderly conduct we often think of someone inciting a riot, peeping through a window, or fighting in public. Rarely do we think of disorderly conduct as a crime that can be committed online. Nevertheless, some states, including Illinois, recognize disorderly conduct as a crime that can be committed either in person or remotely.

Illinois’ Disorderly Conduct Statute

Under code section 720 ILCS 5/26-1, an individual can commit the crime of disorderly conduct in a number of different ways including, including the following:

  • Acting in an unreasonable manner that incites a breach of the peace,
  • Making a false report to the fire department,
  • Entering the property of another and peeping through a window or other opening for a lewd or unlawful purpose,
  • Falsely reporting that an explosive or dangerous device is concealed somewhere that threatens human life, or
  • Falsely reporting that a crime is being committed.

Disorderly Conduct Committed Online

Now that social medical has become so pervasive in today’s society, the law has been forced to recognize that acts of disorderly conduct are no longer solely committed in person. For example, years ago when an individual wanted to incite a riot they did so by standing on a soap box in a public square. Now, it is often much more efficient to rile up the masses by posting online.

In an effort to keep up with changing times, lawmakers in Illinois have even made attempts to amend our state’s disorderly conduct statute so that the act of uploading certain videos onto the Internet explicitly constitutes disorderly conduct. For instance, House Bill 4419 attempted to expand Illinois’ definition of disorderly conduct to include the act of uploading videos depicting a crime being committed, batteries, gang-related fights, or other acts of violence with the intent to condone or promote such violence.

Contact a Local Disorderly Conduct Defense Attorney

If you or your child has been charged with disorderly conduct in Illinois, be aware that such an offense is serious and can be charged as either a misdemeanor or a felony and that, if convicted, you may face time in jail. Therefore, if you have been accused of engaging in disorderly conduct in Illinois, whether online or in person, be sure to contact The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley today. One of our experienced Rolling Meadows disorderly conduct defense attorneys would be happy to review your case during a free confidential consultation at our office.

Source:

https://www.usnews.com/news/best-states/illinois/articles/2017-10-30/student-charged-with-hate-crime-after-social-media-post

When Juveniles Commit a Theft That Turns Into Residential Burglary

April 28th, 2017 at 1:42 pm

residential burglary, Rolling Meadows Juvenile Crime LawyerAs the weather begins to warm up, many homeowners in the area will open their doors and garages to allow the sunshine in and to air out their homes after a long, cold winter. In suburbia, it is not uncommon for people to leave their garage doors open during the daytime, and to even leave them open without supervision.

While normally such behavior should be safe, open doors can be inviting, especially to juveniles. Take, for example, a group of teenagers who see an open and apparently unguarded garage and enter in search for beer. One teen in the group might dare another to go steal the beer or something else from the open garage. Under pressure from his or her friends, the unfortunate teen will enter the garage and commit the theft.

When Theft Turns Into Residential Burglary

The teen who steals the beer from the garage, however, has done more than merely commit a theft. Because the teen entered the garage of another without permission, and with the intent to steal the beer, the criminal charges the teen can face will likely be upgraded to residential burglary. Why is the upcharge so bad for a teen? Residential burglary is a felony level offense, even if the offender is only a juvenile.

While someone who is under 18 years of age will likely face juvenile charges for his or her theft of the beer from someone’s garage, it is still a serious matter. When it comes to juveniles who commit offenses, the courts have a lot of discretion in terms of how the juvenile offender should be punished. The potential punishments that a convicted juvenile delinquent could face include:

  • Having to pay a fine;
  • Having to pay restitutions to the victim of the residential burglary;
  • Having to attend mandatory counseling sessions or therapy sessions;
  • Being put on probation, which means that the juvenile avoids detention (the juvenile equivalent of jail), but is required to comply with a number of terms, i.e., rules, that are part of his or her probation;
  • Being placed in juvenile detention, weekend detentions, or mandatory community service-type work programs.

Juveniles sometimes make poor decisions and exercise bad judgement. They also can make mistakes about the criminality of the things they do. First time juvenile delinquents are often treated with more leniency by the court than repeat offenders. Any young person facing theft of burglary charges needs to consult with a juvenile offenses lawyer immediately.

Juvenile Delinquents Need an Experienced Criminal Defense Lawyer

A juvenile charged with a crime needs a strong criminal defense lawyer fighting for his or her rights. Contact an experienced Rolling Meadows juvenile crime lawyer for assistance with your case.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=072000050K19-3

Frightening Facts About Juveniles and Crime in Illinois

October 18th, 2016 at 7:00 am

juveniles and crime, Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorneyTeens and young adults sometimes make poor decisions. As a result, they may end up being charged with a crime. Teens may even be involved in criminal activities on a regular basis when they are caught, or they may be first-time offenders. If your teen is involved in a crime, speaking with a skilled criminal defense attorney is essential.

Teens, Crime, and the Statistics

Many crimes that are committed by juveniles occur while they are at school. For instance, according to a 2014 National Report on Juvenile Offenders produced by the U.S. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, some frightening statistics about juveniles and crime while in school in Illinois include:

  • 3.9 percent of juveniles questioned reported having taken a weapon to school with them within the past 30 days prior to being surveyed;
  • 7.6 percent reported having been threatened in school by a weapon possessed by a classmate;
  • 3.3 percent of juveniles reported that they had used alcohol while on school property within the past 30 days;
  • 4.7 percent of juveniles reported using marijuana while at school; and
  • 27.3 percent reported being offered illegal drugs or alcohol while at school.

These statistics show that young people are exposed to a lot of opportunities to engage in criminal activities, even while they are in school. A number of other crimes often occur on school grounds as well, such as assaults, batteries, school-ground fights, thefts, bullying, and harassment.

When Teens Get Into Trouble At School

Teens are subjected to peer pressure, and because they are not good at exercising sound judgement, good kids can make bad choices—they are influenced by their peers. A lot of kids make bad choices and commit crimes because they want to appear cool to their friends, or are going through tough issues at home and are acting out. There are several reasons why teens make the decisions that they do, and they often do not have the foresight to understand the consequences of their actions.

When a teen gets into criminal trouble while in school, there are many consequences. The teen could be suspended or expelled from the school, and criminal charges could be pressed against the teen. If convicted, the teen could have a criminal record. These are all very serious consequences that can have a long-lasting impact on a young person’s life. The teen could have trouble finishing school, could develop a reputation as a troublemaker within the school, or could have difficulty getting accepted to college.

Contact Us Today for Help

Do not let your teen’s misguided mistake turn into a lifetime of harsh consequences. One youthful mistake could haunt your teen for many years to come in the future. If your child has been charged with a crime, it is important to diligently and aggressively fight the charges. Do not hesitate to contact a Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney immediately. Our office can help you today. Call 847-394-3200.

Source:

http://www.ojjdp.gov/ojstatbb/nr2014/downloads/NR2014.pdf

Juvenile Crime: Even Minor Offenses Can Have Huge Impact on Your Child’s Future

September 2nd, 2015 at 7:04 pm

Illinois juvenile crimes attorney, Illinois defense lawyer, Illinois criminal attorney,All too often, good kids get involved with a bad crowd and end up getting into trouble with the law. The crimes are usually the result of a moment of poor judgement (sometimes very poor judgement), but are not overly serious offenses. When teens get arrested for acts of vandalism, such as defacing property or damaging property, it can upset the whole family and can affect the teen’s life in unforeseen ways in the future.

Defacement of Property

One of the most common crimes committed by teens involves acts of vandalism or the defacement of property through graffiti art, marking or painting someone else’s property. Teens can face serious consequences, under 720 ILCS 5/21-1.3, if they are caught by police. For instance:

  • A first offense that causes less than $300 worth of damage is a Class B misdemeanor, and is punishable by a fine of up to $1,500 and up to six months of jail time;
  • A second or subsequent offense that causes less than $300 worth of damage is a Class A misdemeanor, and is punishable by a fine of up to $2,500 and up to 12 months of jail time; and
  • Charges are upgraded to a Class 3 felony when the defacement occurs to a school, church or farm equipment, which means the consequences are upgraded as well. Offenders face two to five years of jail time and a fine of up to $25,000.

Criminal Damage to Property

Another common crime committed by teens is damage to property. This may include destroying property by hitting it with a vehicle, shooting it with an air rifle or BB gun, or a number of other activities that destroys or damages the property of others. Depending how serious the damage to property is, under 720 ILCS 5/21-1 a teen can face misdemeanor or felony charges, jail time, and fines.

Juvenile Crimes Can Affect Your Child’s Future

It is important to fight charges of damage to property or defacement because juvenile convictions can have lasting impacts on a teen’s life. Juvenile courts have significant discretion over juvenile cases, so it is critical to consult with an experienced, local juvenile vandalism criminal defense attorney. Some of the most significant impacts to a teen’s life after a juvenile criminal conviction include:

  • Jail time;
  • Fines;
  • Difficulty getting a job in the future;
  • Developing a bad reputation;
  • The inability to work in certain types of industries (for example, child care providers often conduct background checks on prospective hires, and will not employ a person with any criminal history at all); and
  • In some cases, scholarships for college could be lost.

Contact the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley

A criminal conviction, even as a juvenile, can have a serious impact on a teen’s future. It is important that you defend against the charges and fight for your rights. You need to get into contact with an experienced Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney immediately. Call the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley at (847) 394-3200 for a consultation.

 

Sources:

www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs4.asp?DocName=072000050HArt.+21%2C+Subdiv.+1&ActID=1876&ChapterID=53&SeqStart=64600000&SeqEnd=65400000

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs4.asp?DocName=072000050HArt.+21%2C+Subdiv.+1&ActID=1876&ChapterID=53&SeqStart=64600000&SeqEnd=65400000

Juvenile Justice System: Some Juveniles Are Tried as Adults in Illinois

April 16th, 2015 at 5:49 pm

Illinois defense attorney, Illinois criminal lawyer, Illinios juvenile crime attorney, We have two different systems in Illinois that deal with criminal justice: one for adults and one for juveniles under the age of 18. Cook County was one of the first places in the country to do this, realizing that children, by their very nature, are capable of changing their nature. Their brains, including their ability to control their impulses, are not fully developed, so they are not as culpable for their bad actions as their older counterparts. Unfortunately, some of these young people in Illinois are treated as adults despite the fact that this treatment is not supported by science.

The Juvenile Justice System in Illinois

The treatment of juveniles accused of crimes is covered in Illinois by the Juvenile Court Act. One of the goals of the act is supposed to be to provide individualized assessments and adjudications in juvenile cases with the goal of rehabilitation and preventing future delinquent behavior by juveniles. This can involve detention in some circumstances, but also involves diversion programs. In other words, unlike criminal prosecutions that are based almost exclusively on the ideas of punishment, revenge, and isolation of offenders from society, the juvenile system exists so as to change childhood bad behavior so that young people may improve their behavior and work well in society. The children found responsible for crimes under the juvenile system face a different punishment system from their adult counterparts, and they have stronger privacy rights including the ability to have their records shielded from public view.

Some Juvenile Offenders are Forced into the Adult System

Unfortunately, some of the most troubled juvenile offenders do not receive the benefit of the juvenile system. A portion of the Juvenile Court Act excludes certain minors from the protections of the law. Minors aged 15, 16, or 17 may not be judged in the juvenile system if they are accused of certain crimes. These crimes include first degree murder, aggravated sexual assault, certain types of aggravated battery with a firearm, armed robbery committed with a firearm, and aggravated vehicular hijacking with a firearm. In all fairness, these crimes are some of the most serious violent crimes on the books. But, while the crimes may be more serious, this does not indicate in anyway that the minors committing them are somehow more mature and developed than their peers who are committing less serious felonies like burglary or selling drugs. If anything, committing these sorts of crimes may demonstrate that a particular young person is not fully matured and does not yet have the impulse control of an adult.

Particularly troubling, however, is the sentencing for these crimes. If a young person charged with his or her first burglary were charged as adult, which cannot happen, the worst case scenario would involve the minor spending a few years in confinement. But when a 15-year-old is prosecuted as an adult for one of the serious charges mentioned in the previous paragraph, he or she faces sentences that are often so long that they act as de facto life sentences.

As a society we need to reconsider allowing juveniles to be tried as adults in criminal court. But in the meantime both juveniles and their parents need to understand the serious adult consequences they could face if charged with certain crimes.

Call the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley

If your child has been charged with a crime, you will need an experienced Rolling Meadows juvenile criminal defense attorney. This is especially true if your child is charged as an adult. Call the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley today at (847)394-3200.

Addressing Sexting among Juveniles

November 25th, 2014 at 9:44 pm

juvenile sex crimes, Illinois juvenile attorney, Illinois criminal defense lawyerJuvenile crimes generally get special and specific considerations when they are prosecuted in the court system. Many times, juvenile offenders participate in criminal activity merely as a result of immaturity or inexperience. One bad judgment call can have significant effects if the action results in an illegal act. Of course, there are certainly other juvenile cases that are much more serious and involve significant crimes and associated penalties depending on the facts of the case. Determining how to address issues and handle juvenile offenders in light of their crime and personal history is a main challenge of the juvenile justice system.

The Crime of Sexting

Sexting is an offense that has made headlines in Chicago several times in 2014. It is one such juvenile offense that may be handled differently according to the facts and circumstances of a case and the particular offender or offenders involved. There are likely cases in which the offense was the result of poor judgment, and other cases may have more intentional actions, leading to more serious consequences. According to a recently published report, law enforcement in Chicago are currently dealing with a high-profile sexting case, allegedly involving at least three juveniles. It is the sixth such juvenile case that officials have had to address this year alone.

Law enforcement officials are saying that the issue of sexting extends far beyond Chicago and Illinois, and that it is a national epidemic. Some police departments deal with a new sexting case every week. With the crime being so prevalent, many are asking why teens and others continue to engage in such behavior. Law enforcement officials with experience dealing with such cases seem to think that juveniles who engage in such behavior often lack the capacity to think about the consequences of their actions when it comes to sexting. When choosing to engage in such behavior, they are often driven by hormones and emotions and fail to realize the effect that sexting can have on them down the road.

In light of this, the relevant sexting laws were specifically written in order to account for such situations in which minors simply exhibited poor judgment and deserve a second chance. The law allows law enforcement officials to consider alternatives to filing criminal charges against juveniles who participate in sexting, when doing so is appropriate in light of the circumstances. This gives deserving juveniles the opportunity to move on from an incident with little effect on their lives in the long term. Law enforcement stresses the importance of parent’s as well as school official’s involvement in such cases in order to be successful in combating such behavior.

Criminal Defense Attorney

If you have been charged with a crime as a juvenile, speaking with an experienced criminal defense attorney is imperative. The experienced Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorneys at the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley have represented juvenile clients in a variety of matters. Contact us today to discuss your case.

High Juvenile Arrest Rates in Local Illinois Counties

October 24th, 2014 at 3:12 pm

juvenile arrest rates, Illinois defense attorney, Illinois juvenile crime lawyer,Juvenile cases, like all other criminal cases, vary in severity depending on the charges and the circumstances surrounding the offense. Most of the time, juvenile cases differ from adult criminal cases mainly in the focus on rehabilitation over punishment in sentencing. There is an intense aim to intervene with juvenile offenders at a young age in order to give the minor his or her best chance at avoiding a life of crime.

Counties with High Arrest Rates

According to a recent report, some local Illinois counties are addressing the problem of juvenile arrests much more often than others. The Illinois Criminal justice Information Authority looked at data gathered from 2012 regarding juvenile arrests in the state of Illinois. In that year, approximately 30,000 minors between ages 10 and 16 were arrested in the state.

Despite the fact that the data also revealed an overall decrease in juvenile arrests across the state since 2005, there were 18 Illinois counties named that were considered to have high arrest rates in 2012. Cook County was among them and had the highest juvenile arrest rate across the state. Interestingly, another 11 counties in the state did not report a single juvenile arrest in that same year.

Other Statistics

The same data from 2012 also showed that males in the age range of 10 to 16 were four times as likely to be arrested in the state of Illinois as female minors in the same age group. Females were found to be more likely to commit crimes against persons, while their male counterparts were more likely to commit crimes involving property. Sex crimes were the least common type of cases for both genders.

Risk Factors

The report also was able to identify whether or not a juvenile is likely to become a delinquent offender based on several risk factors. They include individual, environmental, and social considerations. It found that minors who exhibit certain types of behavior such as aggression, hyperactivity, impulsiveness, anxiety, and substance abuse are more likely to commit a criminal offense and end up in the juvenile justice system in Illinois. In addition, the offenders that end up in the juvenile system are also more likely to have poor relationships with their parents, not many friends on the social level, and perform poorly in school. Environmental factors that can contribute to a child’s likelihood of becoming a juvenile offender include availability of drugs, being exposed to high levels of adult criminality and violence, and the existence of racial prejudice in their community.

Juvenile Crimes Attorney

Being charged with a crime as a juvenile is a very serious matter. Having an experienced, professional attorney can make all the difference to the minor involved in the case. The dedicated Rolling Meadows defense attorneys at the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley have successful experience representing clients in juvenile matters in Cook and DuPage County. Contact us today to schedule a consultation to discuss your case.

Measuring Recidivism Rate in Juvenile Cases

September 29th, 2014 at 6:45 pm

Illinois criminal defense attorney, Rolling Meadows defense lawyer, juvenile delinquincy, juvenile crime rate, In many ways, juvenile cases are treated differently than criminal cases in adult court. As a general rule, the court’s focus in juvenile cases should be on providing treatment to minor offenders and focusing on their rehabilitation in an attempt to steer them away from becoming lifetime criminal offenders. Sometimes, this works. Other times, it does not. One way officials have attempted to determine how successfully a juvenile has been rehabilitated is to study recidivism rates, or whether they have repeated criminal conduct. As one study points out, states measure recidivism differently, which could lead to inaccurate information.

Differences in Measuring Recidivism

Whether or not a juvenile has successfully rehabilitated after having a run-in with the law is often determined according to whether or not they have re-offended. The problem with this method is that different agencies in different states use different factors to determine rates of recidivism, which often leads to unreliable data, according to the study. For example, some may or may not use an adult arrest as a variable to calculate the rate of recidivism while others may or may not use a juvenile arrest. In addition, the study found that other varying factors include taking a type of juvenile facility into account, as opposed to the length of a juvenile’s stay in that facility. These differences make comparisons among states and agencies virtually useless.

However, tracking individual progress is still worthwhile as long as there is a consistent measure of recidivism within an agency. If states do so, they can use the information gathered to improve their performance, enforce accountability, and use resources more efficiently.

Beyond Recidivism

Tracking recidivism is not the only thing to focus on in determining the success of a juvenile’s rehabilitation. Factors such as education, employment, and health are equally important. However, many of these factors are left out of agencies’ calculations completely. The study encouraged policymakers and juvenile justice agency leaders to include such factors in their measures for success, to help determine not only whether a juvenile is staying out of the criminal system but also on positive outcomes, including whether he or she is becoming a productive adult.

The danger in keeping the focus solely on recidivism is that it assumes offenders need correcting but that society does not, and that correcting offenders will surely lead to reduced rates in crime. In addition, only considering recidivism in determining a juvenile’s success may indicate the juvenile justice process was effective when in fact, the juvenile can actually have had a negative outcome.

Criminal Defense Attorney

The experienced Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorneys at the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley have successful experience representing juveniles who have been charged with crimes. Contact us today to schedule a consultation to discuss your case.

Illinois Prosecutors Taking Aim at Truancy

September 17th, 2014 at 7:33 am

truant juvenile, truancy prosecution, Illinois criminal defense attorney, Chicago juvenile crime attorney, Cases involving juvenile criminal offenses deserve special consideration, especially since many of these cases present an important opportunity to get a child or adolescent back on track. Truancy cases involve a particular set of concerns, mainly because they not only implicate a juvenile and his or her actions, but could implicate the juvenile’s parents or guardians in criminal liability as well. Prosecutors in several counties in the state of Illinois are charging an increasing number of parents with the crime of truancy.

Criminal Charges for Parents

Both St. Clair County and Madison County in Illinois have been focusing on charging a juvenile’s parents with the crime of truancy if their children are offenders. This is apparently part of a larger movement across the country to address the issue of truancy. According statistics, officials in St. Clair County have charged 13 parents so far this year with truancy because their children are chronically absent from school. This number has increased from eight in 2013, and just one parent in 2012. Madison County has charged a surprising 30 parents so far this calendar year with the crime, up significantly from 10 last year and seven parents in 2012. The offense is graded as a misdemeanor and can result in imprisonment of up to 30 days, imposition of a fine, or both. According to Illinois law, a child is considered truant if he or she has nine days of unexcused absences in the previous 180-day period.

The Focus on Truancy

Prosecutors are saying that the renewed efforts at truancy offenders are part of a larger plan of combating crime. In addressing truancy issues, they believe they are taking a step in crime prevention since truancy is often the first step in a pattern of later criminal activity, often resulting in prison time when such truant juveniles become adults.

Most times, there is an effort to intervene in the truancy process long before any criminal charges are filed. This includes communication to parents after just a few absences, and implementation of a corrective action plan if the truancies continue. A hearing is scheduled if a student reaches nine unexcused absences. If such a problem remains uncorrected, the case is referred to a Regional Office. If a truancy problem persists at this stage, a state attorney is likely to get involved. Some offices even have a policy of criminally charging both the student and the parent if the child is in middle or high school.

Criminal Defense Attorney

The knowledgeable Illinois criminal defense attorneys at the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley have vast experience in representing juveniles who are charged with crimes. If you or your child needs representation in a juvenile matter, do not hesitate to contact our office to schedule a consultation and learn how we can help you.

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