Search
Facebook Twitter Google Our Blog
The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley
24 HOUR ANSWERING | 847-394-3200
SERVICE

1855 Rohlwing Road, Suite D, Rolling Meadows, IL 60008

24 HOUR ANSWERING SERVICE

Archive for the ‘Criminal defense’ Category

Criminal Cases: Who Needs Science for Scientific Evidence?

June 21st, 2017 at 12:18 pm

criminal cases, criminal trials, forensic testing, Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer, scientific evidenceAttorney General Jeff Sessions recently announced that the National Commission on Forensic Science is to be dissolved. The National Commission on Forensic Science is a non-political commission whose mandate is to oversee and advance the reliability and preciseness of scientific evidence used in criminal cases.

The commission is made up of a mixed group of people who are trained to monitor and audit the uses of scientific evidence. Various agencies including federal, state, and local forensic service providers work together to strengthen the reliability of forensic science as a whole and particularly how it is used in criminal cases.

Forensic evidence explains a type of evidence that can come in many forms. Forensic evidence can be:

  • Dental records;
  • Fingerprints;
  • Genetic material;
  • Trace chemicals;
  • Shoe imprints;
  • Bodily fluids; or
  • Skin cells.

Forensic evidence can be defined as evidence that was gained through scientific methodology like ballistics testing, blood analysis, or DNA testing. It is evidence used to link crimes together or to build a narrative about what the prosecution thinks happened in a particular case.

The Attorney General is poised to lay the responsibility of forensic testing squarely on the shoulders of the police and prosecutors office. However, unbridled scientific evidence that is used at criminal trials by prosecutors is extremely problematic in that it can lead directly to the conviction of innocent people.

When the authenticity of scientific results is maintained by the side of the criminal justice system that seeks to use it, the potential for misuse or corruption is ever present.

In 2015, the United States Department of Justice, in conjunction with the FBI, found that nearly every examiner in the FBI’s microscopic hair unit “gave misleading, exaggerated, or otherwise flawed testimony in criminal cases between 1972 and 1999.” Hence, the criminal justice system has been speculating results, not providing reliable results, with regard to evidence used to send people to jail.

Do Not Fear Forensic Evidence

Many criminal trials turn on forensic evidence. It is evidence prosecutors rely on, evidence juries like to hear, and evidence intended to be inherently reliable. If you are the defendant in a criminal trial and the state has forensic evidence they intend to use against you, a skilled and experienced Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer can defend your rights and challenge the evidence against you. Contact our Rolling meadows office at 847-394-3200 to schedule your initial consultation. The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley is prepared 24 hours a day to serve our clients in need of criminal defense.

Sources:

http://www.newsweek.com/sessionss-assault-forensic-science-will-lead-more-unsafe-convictions-585762

https://www.justice.gov/archives/ncfs

Illinois Mayor Opposes Consent Decree

June 14th, 2017 at 7:00 am

consent decree, police reform, Rahm Emanuel, Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney, criminal allegationsWhen recently asked about an independent federal monitor, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel explained that “it is exactly the right way,” in regards to proposed oversight for the Chicago Police Department.

Negotiations between the Mayor and the Justice Department are focused on a memorandum of agreement. This would incorporate the structure for approving reforms that federal authorities have advocated for in the wake of several controversies which have rocked the Chicago Police Department in recent years.

Justice Department approval would still be required for the oversight measures to go into effect. The measures would include explicit oversight by an appointed independent monitor to oversee the proposed reforms. The Mayor’s administration believes that this is an important step further. However, some reform advocates are not satisfied.

Why Reform Advocates Want a Consent Decree

Police reform advocates had counted on a federal consent decree that authorizes the court to enforce the new policies instead of just monitoring them. The mayor defended his administration’s argument alleging that the road to reform is not as important as the reform itself.

Critics say that in the wake of the searing report released by the Justice Department roughly four months ago, more needs to be done than simply monitoring a problem that the community already knows exists. The Chicago Police Department has been saddled with controversies over their use of force policies.

The former head of the Civil Rights Division has argued that Chicago has seen a pattern of recommendations without teeth and that a consent decree would be a more potent tool to hold the police accountable to the suggested reforms.

The Justice Department and Consent Decrees

For a consent decree to take effect, the Justice Department must sign off on it. Initially, in the wake of the Justice Department report, Mayor Emanuel supported a consent decree. However, after the appointment of the current Attorney General, Jeff Sessions, it is unlikely that an agreement for a consent decree would be worked out with the city.

Police Investigations

Being investigated for a crime is a harrowing experience. One that is fraught with legal peril and can have serious detrimental consequences on your life. It is unwise to face these allegations on your own. Our experienced and dauntless Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney will defend your rights at every stage of your investigation or subsequent case. Contact our Cook County office at 847-394-3200 to schedule your initial consultation.

Sources:

http://chicago.suntimes.com/news/independent-monitor-included-in-cpd-reform-agreement-sent-to-doj/amp/

https://www.wbez.org/shows/wbez-news/mayor-defends-cpd-monitor-over-consent-decree/2b92530c-0bb0-4c95-acb7-4cade9cc9d3a

Illinois Innocence Project

June 7th, 2017 at 7:00 am

Illinois Innocence Project, Rolling Meadows, exoneree, criminal justice system, criminal charges, Illinois crimeYou were innocent. You knew it all along and now you have your freedom. But what happens next?

There is a group operating out of Springfield, Illinois called the Illinois Innocence Project. They have been working since early 2001 to overturn wrongful criminal convictions in Illinois. At the start, their primary focus was exonerating inmates through legal avenues, and the group has had much success.

The most recent example of their success was the release of one man, Charles Palmer, who was set free the day before thanksgiving in 2016, after he had been forced to spend 18 years of his life behind bars for a crime he did not commit.

A surprising yet inevitable new issue to address arose when the Illinois Innocence Project noticed that many times the people who were exonerated lacked educational, emotional, or familial support once they were released. 

Governor Bruce Rauner has advocated for a 25 percent reduction in the Illinois prison population within the next 10 years. The time frame in which the inmates reenter society is important because they have an opportunity to prepare themselves for release, get their affairs in order, and otherwise have a more temperate and gradual reintroduction to society.

Not every inmate released has that opportunity. Take for example, Charles Palmer, who had roughly two weeks’ notice that there was a possibility for his release, and did not find out until the day before his release that his freedom was probable. This presents a massive challenge to an exoneree who otherwise had no reason to anticipate his or her release. According to John Hanlon, the executive and legal director for IIP, “the average exoneree does not have any money, a job, or even any place to go. It’s a tremendous challenge.”

What to Do If You Are Charged with a Crime You Did Not Commit

If you are arrested or charged with a crime, then the very first step you should take is to contact a lawyer. Your lawyer will offer you advice on questions you should or should not answer. Immediately contacting a lawyer also gives your attorney time to note any important details surrounding your case—information which may help give you the best opportunity to fight the crimes for which you have been charged. 

The criminal justice system is a massive machine with numerous moving parts all moving against you. This is not the time to try and stand on your own two feet. You need an experienced and fearless Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney to stand up with you and defend your rights. If you or a loved one has been charged with a crime, contact The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley at 847-394-3200. 

Source:

http://illinoistimes.com/article-18578-you%25E2%2580%2599re-a-free-man_-now-what.html

When Police Confiscate Property

June 5th, 2017 at 7:15 am

police confiscate property, Rolling Meadows, criminal law, seize property, civil forfeiture, private propertyIllinois lawmakers unanimously passed a measure making it more arduous for law enforcement to confiscate property from innocent owners. The bill passed in the Senate and will now head to the house.

The plan would shift the burden of proof to authorities in circumstances where they seize an individual’s property under a criminal investigation. As it stands, Illinois law allows for the confiscation of an individual’s property even in cases where no formal charges are levied against the owner.

There is a strong financial incentive for law enforcement agencies to seize property. Once the property has been taken, then the agency who took possession of the property, in many cases, reaps the rewards of the proceeds from the civil asset forfeiture. In addition to not having a constitutionally guaranteed right to counsel once a person has had his or her property seized, it can be costly to challenge and often leaves people with no mechanism to get their property back.

What is Civil Forfeiture?

Civil forfeiture refers to the legal process in which law enforcement seizes assets from a person suspected of involvement with criminal activity. The controversial nature of this policy has its genesis in the fact that formal criminal charges do not have to be filed to seize property. Every year in Illinois, authorities snatch tens of millions of dollars in cash, cars, and land from Illinois state citizens. As of 2005, Illinois law enforcement has seized over $319 million from Illinois residents in concert with federal authorities who have seized over $404 million over the same period.

Forfeiture laws can be traced back to admiralty law. Historically, authorities were allowed to seize contraband from ships engaging in criminal activity. The Crime Control Act of 1984 broadened civil forfeiture at the federal level.  

Proposed Changes

The new bill passed by the Illinois Senate would place a stricter burden on law enforcement officials attempting to seize private citizens property. The bill would require that officials prove that the individual consented to his or her assets being used for criminal activity, reversing the current law requiring the citizen to prove that he or she was not involved. The new law would also create a streamlined process for innocent parties who have had their property seized to take possession of their property.

Rolling Meadows Criminal Defense

Being charged with a crime is a serious ordeal, even in cases where no civil forfeiture has occurred. It is essential to enlist the help of a dedicated and knowledgeable Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney. The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley provides clients with thorough and detailed criminal defense for matters including traffic offenses, DUI defense, and a litany of other criminal cases. Contact our Rolling Meadows office at 847-394-3200 to schedule your initial consultation.

Source:

https://www.illinoispolicy.org/reports/asset-forfeiture-in-illinois/

When is Trespassing a Crime?

May 15th, 2017 at 9:04 am

trespassing, Rolling Meadows Criminal Defense LawyerAs a youth , sneaking into a movie theater or a pool after hours may seem like good fun; however, making a choice such as this can turn into a criminal trespassing arrest or conviction.

Illinois law sets out what kind of activity is considered criminally liable trespassing. Those elements include but are not limited to the following:

  • A person knowingly, without lawful authority, enters or remains within or on a building;
  • A person enters land owned by another, and the owner gave notice that entry was forbidden;
  • A person remains upon the land of another after receiving notice that entry was forbidden;
  • A person falsely gains access to premises for which general public entry is forbidden; and
  • A person intentionally removes notice that entry is forbidden.

What Are the Penalties for Criminal Trespassing?

This is a question for your Rolling Meadows, Cook County criminal trespassing defense attorney. The penalties will vary depending on the circumstances of each crime. Generally, criminal trespassing in Illinois is a misdemeanor. Therefore, a conviction will likely encompass a fine; however, it can also land you in jail for up to a year. There are different categories of criminal trespassing, and include:

  • Criminal trespass to vehicles;
  • Criminal trespass to real property;
  • Criminal trespass to state supported land;
  • Criminal trespass to restricted areas;
  • Criminal trespass to a nuclear facility; and
  • Criminal trespass to a place of public amusement.

Each variation of trespassing can give you a varying penalty, or be used in conjunction with another crime which can also affect the sentence handed down. It is important that you speak with a knowledgeable Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney about the potential repercussions you may face as well as map out a strategy for your defense.

What Defenses Are Available?

The type of trespassing you are charged with will drive the defenses that you have available to you. For example, a common defense to the trespass of land is arguing that there was not sufficient notice to forbid entrance. It may also be argued that the land you were trespassing on was open to the public and therefore you did not break the law by being present on it. Ignorance of the law or mistake of fact are typically not defenses to trespass.

Been Arrested for Trespassing?

If you or a loved one has been charged with a trespassing crime, then it is crucial that you get the dedicated and insightful representation you deserve. Attorney Christopher M. Cosley has nearly two decades of standing up for his clients rights and providing criminal defense every step of the way for his clients. Contact our skilled Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer at 847-394-3200, 24 hours a day, to schedule your consultation. Do not face these charges alone.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=072000050K21-3

Is it Burglary, Theft, or Robbery?

May 10th, 2017 at 8:54 am

burglary, theft, robbery, Rolling Meadows Criminal Defense LawyerBurglary, theft, and robbery are serious crimes, and each one has distinctive characteristics. Illinois law is very specific in how it defines these crimes and it takes a knowledgeable Rolling Meadows defense lawyer to explain how the laws differ and what the difference means moving forward in your case.

  • Burglary is defined by Illinois law as entering the property of another, knowingly, and without permission, and with the intent to commit a theft or a felony once inside the property.  It is a common misconception that the property needs to be a home. Boats, cars, railroad cars, even airplanes can be burglarized.
  • Theft, as defined by Illinois law, is the unlawful or unauthorized taking of property from another person with the intent to permanently deprive that person of the property.
  • Robbery is the most serious of these three offenses and generally carries the most severe punishments. The reason for that is the violent nature of the offense. Robbery is basically theft accomplished through the use of force, or the fear of force.

Can a Theft Turn into a Robbery?

This is a question you will want to ask your experienced cook county criminal defense lawyer. Generally, the short answer is yes. Theft can turn into robbery the moment the victim is physically harmed or is put in fear of harm. A common example is a purse snatching incident. If a woman sets her purse down on a table and someone whisks by and takes it, a theft has occurred. However, if that person snatches the purse off of the same woman’s arm, it is likely to be charged as a robbery.

Does a Theft Have to Occur for a Burglary Charge?

The short answer is no. A burglary can occur without the actual theft of property. While most burglaries that are committed involve a theft of some sort, it does not have to happen in order for burglary to have happened in the eyes of the law. For example, if someone breaks into his or her neighbor’s home, sneaks in the kitchen, and makes pot brownies, among other crimes they have also committed a burglary.

Facing Criminal Charges?

If you have been arrested and charged with a crime, the first step you should take is to contact your experienced Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer. Attorney Christopher M. Cosley has years of experience defending his clients rights when they have been charged with crimes. The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley is equipped with the resources necessary to minimize the damage of any criminal conviction and ensure that your rights guaranteed by the constitution are honored by the prosecution. Contact our Rolling Meadows office at 847-394-3200, 24 hours a day, to speak with our dedicated and relentless criminal defense lawyer.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs4.asp?ActID=1876&ChapterID=53&SeqStart=62600000&SeqEnd=63400000

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=072000050K16-1

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs4.asp?ActID=1876&ChapterID=53&SeqStart=61900000&SeqEnd=62600000

Burglary of a Vehicle: Is it Considered a Break in if the Car Was Unlocked?

May 1st, 2017 at 8:20 am

burglary of a vehicle, Rolling Meadows Criminal Defense LawyerIt is not unheard of for people to get arrested for breaking into unlocked vehicles in Illinois. In these situations, the individual involved can be charged with a number of different criminal offenses based on the circumstances surrounding their activities.

Anyone who has been arrested and charged with a crime for entering an unlocked vehicle without the owner’s permission needs to consult with an experienced criminal defense lawyer immediately. Your rights are in jeopardy and you need to take steps promptly to protect yourself.

Burglary of a Vehicle

One of the crimes that people who enter an unlocked vehicle without the owner’s permission often face is burglary of a vehicle. When a person knowingly enters a vehicle that he or she does not have permission to enter, and the perpetrator does so with the intent to commit a felony or a theft, it can constitute the offense of burglary of a vehicle. Many times, a vehicle is broken into in order to steal something valuable inside. Sunglasses, music players, cell phones, cash, and airbags are all common items that are stolen from unlocked vehicles. Burglary of a vehicle is a felony.

Regardless of the fact that the vehicle may have been unlocked, if you entered the vehicle without the owner’s permission and removed something from the vehicle with no intention of giving the removed item back to its rightful owner, you will likely face criminal charges of burglary of a vehicle.

  • You could have viable defenses that you could bring up at trial. For instance, perhaps you had permission or believed you had permission from the owner of the vehicle to enter the unlocked vehicle.
  • Perhaps you accidentally opened the vehicle and got inside because it was the same make and model as your own vehicle and you were mistaken that the vehicle was in fact not your own.
  • Maybe you had no intention to commit a felony or to steal anything when you entered the unlocked vehicle belonging to someone else.

You should discuss the facts of your particular situation with your lawyer to determine what defenses you may have available to you.

Criminal Trespass to a Motor Vehicle

You could also be charged with criminal trespass to a motor vehicle. Criminal trespass of a motor vehicle occurs when someone knowingly enters or operates a vehicle belonging to another without permission. It is a misdemeanor offense.

It is not uncommon for criminal defendants to adopt a defense strategy of getting their charges dismissed or reduced to a lesser offense. For someone who is charged with burglary of a motor vehicle, it might be a good strategy to try and get the charges reduced to criminal trespass to a motor vehicle instead. Your specific circumstances should be discussed with your criminal defense lawyer.

Contact an Experienced Criminal Defense Lawyer

You could be charged with a crime if you enter a vehicle without the owner’s permission, even if the vehicle was left unlocked. If you are facing criminal charges for breaking into an unlocked vehicle, you need to consult with an experienced Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer today.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=072000050K21-2

Peeping in a Window is a Form of Disorderly Conduct

March 20th, 2017 at 8:42 am

peeping in a window, Rolling Meadows Criminal Defense LawyerThere are several different offenses that constitute disorderly conduct under Illinois law. However, one of the least obvious forms of disorderly conduct is voyeurism, or “peeping,” which is an invasion of privacy of someone else. The victim, or person who is spied upon, has had his or her personal space violated by the peeping act, and the Illinois courts take the invasion of privacy very seriously.

Like many of the other forms of disorderly conduct, the offense of peeping often involves a state of intoxication—but certainly not always. Being drunk is no excuse under the law for invading the privacy of another by spying on him or her in their home. However, it does lend context to how the peeping incident may have come to pass.

Many criminal defendants who are charged with disorderly conduct for peeping on someone did so as a result of exercising poor judgement, while in a state of intoxication, or were acting in response to peer pressure.

Whatever the case may be for you, if you are facing disorderly conduct charges for peeping, it is important that you work with a lawyer to fight the charges that are pending against you. You are facing a conviction on a misdemeanor offense. You could go to jail, pay a fine, get a criminal record, and you could develop a reputation if you are convicted.

What Constitutes “Peeping” Under Illinois Law?

Under 720 ILCS 5/26-1(a)(11), someone who looks into a dwelling through a window or other opening for the purpose of being lewd or for spying is considered a voyeur. The act must be done deliberately and for a lewd or unlawful purpose. There is a difference between accidentally and coincidentally looking into someone’s window and doing so with the deliberate intent of unlawfully watching someone through a window.

Deliberately peeping or spying on someone without his or her knowledge is illegal in Illinois and it is a crime that is taken very seriously. Since the offender must have a lewd or ill intent in order to commit the crime, a possible defense is that there was no lewd intent to the act. It could be that the defendant just happened to look in a window and saw someone, or that it was an accident.

While such a defense may be the truth, it can be difficult to prove intent. Still, an experienced and skilled criminal defense lawyer can help you put your strongest defense forward as you fight your disorderly conduct charges.

Are You Facing Disorderly Conduct Charges?

If you have been arrested for disorderly conduct, such as peeping on another through a window or some other opening to a dwelling, it is important that you get into touch with an experienced Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer as soon as possible. You could be facing a misdemeanor if you are convicted.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs4.asp?ActID=1876&ChapterID=53&SeqStart=73600000&SeqEnd=74600000

Why it is Important for Criminal Defendants to Show Up to Their Court Dates

March 15th, 2017 at 7:31 am

criminal defendants court date-Rolling MeadowsIf you have been arrested and charged with a crime in Illinois, it is imperative that you appear in court for all of your scheduled court appearances. You may think that it is unnecessary, or that the court has already made up its mind and you showing up will have no bearing on your fate. However, a failure to appear in court is a big deal for a criminal defendant in Illinois and it can have serious and unpleasant consequences.

Best and Worst Case Scenarios

If you have been charged with a crime, you are already in a pretty tough situation. It makes no sense to do something that could make your situation worse. Not appearing for a scheduled court date will not bode well with the court. It is considered disrespectful and rude to miss your scheduled court appearance. The judge, the prosecutors, and your attorney have all made the time to show up to your hearing, and you should show up too. But what could happen if you fail to appear in court?

When it comes handling situations where a criminal defendant fails to appear in court,  the judge has great discretion. In the best case scenario, the judge will presume there is a good reason why the defendant has not appeared in court. For instance, if there is unexpected and bad winter weather it is likely that the defendant could not make his or her court date because of the snow. The judge could simply reschedule the hearing—but this is unlikely. Many judges take offense to being stood up by criminal defendants. What is more likely to happen is that the judge will take some sort of action against you for failing to appear for your scheduled court appointment.

It is not uncommon for a judge to revoke a criminal defendant’s bond, meaning that if the criminal defendant is out of jail because he or she made bond, the judge will take away the criminal defendant’s option to be out of jail on bond, and the criminal defendant will be forced to return to jail. This is usually accompanied by the judge issuing a warrant for the criminal defendant’s arrest.

When the offenses that the criminal defendant is facing are relatively minor, such as the case when the defendant does not show up to a traffic court appointment after receiving a traffic citation, the judge could simply find the defendant guilty as charged.

Work With Your Criminal Defense Lawyer

If you have been arrested and charged with a criminal offense in Illinois, it is important that you get into contact with an experienced Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer as soon as you can. You should work closely with your lawyer. Moreover, if you are concerned that you might not be able to make a court appearance, you should discuss your situation with your lawyer.

Source:

https://www.isba.org/sites/default/files/Media%20Law%20Handbook%20Chapter%2006%20-%20Criminal%20Procedure.pdf

Changes to the Law Concerning How Juveniles Can Seek Expungements

February 13th, 2017 at 9:39 am

expungements, Rolling Meadows Criminal Defense LawyerOne of the most detrimental aspects of a juvenile getting in trouble with the law for committing a criminal offense is that the incident will create a law enforcement and juvenile court record for the minor. Parents and affected juveniles can try to obtain an expungement, which means that they obtain a court order that hides the criminal record from the view of the public. However, a few select entities, such as the government, may still have access to expunged records.

Expunging the record means that the criminal record would not appear in a background check conducted by most individuals, and the affected individual would not have to disclose his or her expunged criminal history.

New Changes to the Law Concerning How Juveniles Can Seek Expungements

The trouble with obtaining a criminal record expungement in the past for a juvenile in Illinois was that there were many restrictions on how and when a juvenile could seek an expungement. However, in 2017 there will be several changes made to Illinois’ criminal justice laws. One change that has particular relevance to minors is how juveniles can seek expungement of their criminal records.

The new law provides that a person who is under the age of 18 years old can petition the court at any time to have his or her criminal record and juvenile court record expunged, or once the juvenile court proceedings against them related to the offense have concluded. The old law limited seeking expungement to juveniles who were 17 years old or older. Eligibility for the ability to petition the juvenile court for expungement is available to:

  1. Juveniles who were arrested, but no petition for delinquency was filed with the clerk of court against them, i.e., if the charges were dropped against the juvenile;
  2. Juveniles who were charged with an offense and a petition for delinquency was filed with the clerk of court, but the petition(s) were dismissed by the court without a finding that the juvenile was delinquent; i.e., the judge dismissed the case against the juvenile;
  3. Juveniles who were arrested and charged, but were not found to be delinquent by the juvenile court, i.e., the juvenile was found not guilty; 
  4. Juveniles who are placed under supervision of the court, and the juvenile’s period of supervision has been successfully completed; and
  5. Juveniles who are adjudicated for a low-level offense, such as a Class B misdemeanor, Class C misdemeanor, or petty or business offense.

It is important to have an experienced criminal defense lawyer fighting the juvenile charges against you so that you will be able to have the charges dropped or dismissed. Once your defense is won, you can seek an expungement of your juvenile criminal record.

Juveniles With Criminal Records Need Help With Expungement

A criminal record may prevent you from getting a job or getting into school. If you want to do something about getting your record expunged, you should contact an experienced Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer for immediate assistance.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/BillStatus.asp?DocTypeID=HB&DocNum=5017&GAID=13&SessionID=88&LegID=94377

Back to Top Back to Top Back to Top