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Disorderly Conduct in Illinois

February 16th, 2018 at 6:55 pm

criminal charges, Disorderly Conduct, Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney, misdemeanor charge, felony chargeWhen people think of disorderly conduct, they may envision someone who is drunk and acting out in public. While this is a form of disorderly conduct, it is not the only one that can cause a person to face criminal charges.

Disorderly conduct refers to an act that disturbs the peace. In some states, such acts result in a mere fine. In Illinois, however, these acts are charged as misdemeanors most of the time. In some instances, they are even charged as felonies.

This means that a disorderly conduct charge can affect your life in many ways. Avoid getting in trouble with the law by understanding what types of acts can get you a criminal record in Illinois.

What Illinois Law Says

Under 720 ILCS 5/26-1, disorderly conduct consists of the following:

  • Acting in an unreasonable manner to alarm or disturb someone;
  • Sending a false alarm related to a fire, bomb, or dangerous chemical;
  • Threatening to destroy a school building, property, or cause injury or death to school officials or those at a school function; 
  • Transmitting a false report to a public safety agency;
  • Calling 911 for the sole purpose of transmitting a false alarm;
  • Transmitting a false report of child abuse;
  • Posing as a debt collector in order to harass an individual; or
  • Entering a property or looking through a window for a lewd purpose.

Types of Disorderly Conduct

Disorderly conduct may include making an obscene gesture or using abusive or vulgar language toward another person in order to incite a fight. Making unreasonably loud noises or using chemicals to create a foul odor are also forms of disorderly conduct. Using a firearm or displaying one’s anus or genitals is also disorderly conduct.

Disorderly Conduct Penalties

Most cases of disorderly conduct are charged as misdemeanors. The penalties include up to one year in jail and a fine of up to $2,500.

Some cases are severe enough to be charged as felonies. When a person makes false reports and calls to government agencies, this wastes public resources and causes fear to community members. These incidents are charged as Class 3 or Class 4 felonies. A person can face up to five years in prison and up to $10,000 in fines.

Need Legal Advice? Contact a Local Criminal Defense Lawyer

Disorderly conduct is not always a minor crime. It can range from a misdemeanor to a felony. Regardless of the act, you do not want to have such a charge on your record, so act quickly to reduce your penalties.

If you are facing disorderly conduct charges, you need solid legal defense to avoid fines and jail time. The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley can help. Dedicated Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney Christopher Cosley has helped many clients reduce their charges. Do not hesitate to contact us today for help.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=072000050K26-1

Aggravated Speeding: What You Need to Know

February 12th, 2018 at 9:21 am

aggravated speeding, aggravated speeding conviction, Illinois traffic offenses, speeding charges, Class A misdemeanorMany people drive a little fast every now and then. For instance, the car in front of you may be going too fast and you simply keep up with the flow of traffic. Or, perhaps you are running late for work and you need to speed up to get there on time. Perhaps you have a sports car and enjoy going fast.

Drivers can be pulled over for going 10, 15 and 20 mph over the speed limit. In these cases, the only punishment is a speeding ticket. You will have to pay the fine as well as take traffic school if you want to avoid insurance premium increases.

However, if you are caught going 26 mph or more above the speed limit, you will face hefty penalties. Going a few miles above the speed limit is one thing, but driving at an excessive speed is considered reckless. This is called aggravated speeding.

What is Aggravated Speeding?

Under 625 ILCS 5/11-601.5, aggravated speeding occurs when a person drives a vehicle at a speed that exceeds the speed limit by 26 mph or more. A person who drives 26-34 mph above the speed limit will face a Class B misdemeanor, while a person exceeding the speed limit by 35 mph or more will face a Class A misdemeanor. This is the most serious type of misdemeanor, and it is one step away from a felony.

Penalties for Aggravated Speeding

A Class B misdemeanor is punishable by six months in jail and a $1,500 fine. A Class A misdemeanor means up to one year in jail and a fine of up to $2,500. The penalties increase when the speeding occurs in a school or construction zone.

An aggravated speeding conviction stays on your record for seven years. Unless you have your record sealed, such a charge will stay on your criminal record for the rest of your life.

Court supervision may be an option for those facing aggravated speeding charges. If you have never faced such a charge previously, you may be able to complete court supervision and keep the charge from appearing on your driving record. The terms of your supervision may include fines, community service, and traffic school.

Let Us Help You with Your Case

Speeding is typically an infraction that involves a ticket, fines, and traffic school. However, excessive speeding can result in a criminal record. Do not let a single speeding incident affect your life.

If you are facing misdemeanor charges for a speeding ticket, you need solid legal defense to avoid fines and jail time. Get help from the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley. Talented Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney Christopher Cosley has helped many clients who have been accused of driving at a speed exceeding the speed limit by 26 mph or more. Contact us today for professional help.

Sources:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/documents/062500050K11-601.5.htm

https://www.isba.org/sections/trafficlaw/newsletter/2015/06/excessiveaggravatedspeeding

Illinois Drag Racing Laws and Consequences

February 9th, 2018 at 8:56 am

Class 4 felony, drag racing, Illinois license revocation, Illinois traffic offenses, street racingTV shows such as “Street Outlaws” make drag racing seem like fun and games. Two tricked-out cars go head to head in a race to see which one is faster. The drivers often bet money and whoever loses pays the winner.

Drag racers take their cars to the limit. They may travel at speeds exceeding 100 mph on city streets. Other drivers and pedestrians can end up seriously injured or even killed by the negligence of drag racers.

Not only is drag racing dangerous, it is also illegal. Drag racing is typically charged as a misdemeanor, but it can be a felony in some instances. 

Illinois Drag Racing Laws

Drag racing, also known as street racing, is considered illegal on all streets and highways in Illinois under Illinois law 625 ILCS 5/11-506. Drag racing is defined as the operation of at least two vehicles side by side traveling at high speeds that are trying to outdistance each other. It also involves one or more vehicles attempting to outdistance another, reach a destination before another, or prevent another vehicle from passing. Drag racing may also be referred to as a test of a driver’s stamina or physical endurance. The race may also occur over a common course.

Drag racing is considered a Class A misdemeanor, which is punishable by a $2,500 fine and up to one year in jail. It is also against the law to allow another person to use your vehicle for street racing. This is considered a Class B misdemeanor, which is punishable by a $1,500 fine and 180 days in jail.

There are situations in which drag racing can be a felony. Aggravated drag racing is defined as drag racing that causes a motor vehicle accident that leads to serious injury, disfigurement, or death. This is classified as a Class 4 felony, with punishment of 1-12 years in prison. A second offense of drag racing will also become a felony charge.

All drag racing convictions will also lead to license revocation or suspension for at least one year. To get your license reinstated, you will need to appear before a hearing office.

Contact Us Today for Professional Help

Drag racing may seem like an innocent act, especially late at night when the roads are deserted. However, drag racing can lead to crashes, serious injury, and even death. At the very least, you could face fines, jail time, and license loss.

If you are facing misdemeanor charges for drag racing or some other speeding offense, you could face jail time and fines. The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley can help reduce your charges. Skilled Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney Christopher Cosley can help you avoid serious penalties.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=062500050K11-506

Drugged Driving in Illinois

February 5th, 2018 at 8:40 am

Class 4 felony, drugged driving, DUI charges, Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney, drug convictionMuch focus is on drunk driving. Even though motorists know they should not drive after drinking, many do anyway. This often leads to serious accidents.

Now that recreational marijuana use is legal in many states—including Illinois—it is important for motorists to understand that drugged driving is against the law as well. If a person is pulled over for driving recklessly and is found to have drugs in his or her system, he or she could face DUI charges, regardless of whether or not he or she is at the legal limit.

However, measuring the amount of drugs in one’s blood is easier said than done. There is no 0.08 percent blood alcohol content (BAC) equivalent for marijuana and other drugs. Plus, unlike alcohol, drugs can stay in a person’s body for weeks after use.

Illinois does have laws in place regarding drugged driving. Therefore, if you do use marijuana—whether for recreational or medicinal purposes—and drive later, you could face DUI charges. 

What is Considered Drugged Driving?

Illinois law allows five nanograms of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) per milliliter of blood or 10 nanograms or more per milliliter of urine or other bodily substance. However, it is also illegal for a person to drive in an unsafe manner and have even the smallest amount of drugs in his or her system. A police officer may perform a blood, breath or urine test, or require the driver to submit to field sobriety testing.

Drugged Driving Penalties

A first offense can result in a $2,500 fine, one year in prison and license suspension for one year. If a person is convicted of a second offense, the penalties increase. They include license suspension for five years, a $2,500 fine, one year of imprisonment, 30 days of community service and completion of a substance treatment program.

Once a person is convicted of three or more DUI charges, the charges become Class 4 felonies. A person will lose his or her driving privileges for six years and be subject to penalties such as drug treatment, a $10,000 fine, and three years in prison.

The penalties are enhanced when the driver is in a school zone or has a passenger under the age of 16 in the car at the time. Enhanced penalties also apply if the driver is under the influence of drugs and causes an accident that results in serious injury, disfigurement, disability, or death.

Contact Us Today for Help

It is illegal to drive while intoxicated, and that means being under the influence of not only alcohol, but drugs as well. Even marijuana use can impair one’s judgment and lead to accidents.

If you are facing DUI charges for having high levels of marijuana or other drugs in your system, you need legal help right away. The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley can defend your case. Passionate Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney Christopher Cosley can work to reduce your penalties. Let us help you today.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=062500050K11-501.2

What Does it Mean to be an Accessory to a Crime?

February 2nd, 2018 at 7:07 pm

accessory to a crime, aiding and abetting, Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer, criminal conviction, committing a crimeWhen a crime is committed, the person who actually carries out the illegal act is referred to as the “principal.” Any person who assists in the commission of the offense but did not actually participate in committing the crime is called an “accessory.” For example, pretend that two friends decide to rob a bank and they agree that Friend A is going to go into the bank and rob it while Friend B waits for him out front in the getaway car. If these friends carry out the bank robbery as planned, then Friend A would be principal (as he committed the actual robbery) while Friend B would be the accessory (given that he assisted in the commission of the robbery).

Generally speaking, an accessory to a crime is anyone who willingly and knowingly aids and abets the principal in committing a crime. This assistance can come either before, after, or during the commission of the crime. However, it is important to note that the precise definition of what it takes to qualify as an accessory to a crime varies a bit from state to state.

Illinois’ Main Aiding and Abetting Law

Illinois’ main aiding and abetting l law is codified under code section 720 ILCS 5/5-2 and in relevant part states that it is illegal to knowingly help or assist someone else commit a crime. Regardless of whether this unlawful assistance comes before, during, or after the commission of the crime, the aiding party can still be held liable as an accessory to the crime. Furthermore, it is important to note that an accessory to a crime does not need to have been physically present at the scene of the crime in order to be found guilty.

The Penalty for Being an Accessory to a Crime in Illinois

You may be surprised to learn that a convicted accessory in Illinois can receive the same penalty as the principal whom he or she aided. In other words, if the bank robbing friends from the example above were caught and convicted in Illinois, then Friend B, who was guilty of being an accessory to the crime, is eligible to receive the same sentence (including jail time, fines, probation, restitution, etc.) that he would have been eligible for had he been the principal in the bank robbery rather than the accessory.

Need Legal Advice?

If you have been accused of committing a crime or of being an accessory to a crime, it is critical that you consult with a talented Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer about mounting your defense without delay. Time is of the essence, so it is important that you find a lawyer who has experience handling cases similar to yours to advise you on your legal options. At The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley we represent clients in a wide variety of criminal cases throughout Illinois and would be happy to assist you.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs4.asp?DocName=072000050HArt.+5&ActID=1876&ChapterID=53&SeqStart=7200000&SeqEnd=7800000

A Brief Overview of Criminal Intent

January 29th, 2018 at 7:53 pm

criminal intent, malice aforethought, Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney, Illinois criminal law, Illinois criminal casesCriminal intent (or mens rea) is an important legal concept to understand if you are going to stand trial for committing a criminal offense as the prosecution is required to establish mens rea (i.e. that the defendant had a guilty mind) in order for the defendant to be found guilty in many criminal cases. Depending on the severity of crime that was allegedly committed, the prosecution will need to prove that the defendant acted intentionally and possessed one of the following types of criminal intent when the illegal act was committed: malice aforethought, specific intent, or general intent.  

Malice Aforethought

Malice aforethought is the state of mind that is necessary in order to prove the most serious types of homicide. An individual possessed malice aforethought if he or she intended to kill or to cause great bodily harm. Malice aforethought is critical in homicide cases as this distinction in criminal intent is the key difference between murder and malice as murder is an unlawful killing that is committed with malice aforethought while manslaughter is an unlawful killing that does not involve malice aforethought.    

Specific Intent

In order to obtain a conviction for the most serious criminal offenses, apart from murder, the prosecution is required to show that the defendant specifically intended to cause a certain bad result, to do something more than commit the criminal act for which he or she is on trial, or acted with the knowledge that his or her conduct is against the law. Therefore, an individual is typically said to have acted with specific intent if he or she intentionally committed an unlawful act with the desire to cause a particular outcome.   

General Intent

General intent is similar to specific intent as they both require the defendant to have acted intentionally; however, if the defendant did not do something more than the criminal act itself nor did he or she act with the additional desire to cause a certain result, then he or she likely acted with general intent. In other words, an individual acts with general intent if he or she meant to do an act that is prohibited by law.

Specific Intent vs. General Intent: Which One?

It should be noted that criminal law statutes do not always specifically state whether an individual is required to have possessed specific or general intent in order to be convicted of committing the crime at hand. If the statute does not spell out the requisite level of criminal intent, then the court will determine whether the crime requires general or specific intent by looking at the language used in the statute. For example, if the statute uses terms like “voluntarily” and “knowingly” then the crime will often be considered a general intent crime.   

Contact a Local Criminal Defense Lawyer

Criminal law is complex and as such anyone who has been charged with a crime and is looking to retain legal counsel should take care to hire a local criminal defense lawyer who has extensive experience handling criminal cases. Talented Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney Christopher Cosley is just such a lawyer. If you have been charged with a crime in Illinois and live in the greater Chicago area, feel free to contact the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley at your earliest convenience to schedule an initial consultation with Mr. Cosley to discuss your legal options.

Source:

https://www.law.cornell.edu/wex/mens_rea

Who is Eligible to Have Their Name Removed From the IL Sex Offender Registry?

January 24th, 2018 at 8:34 am

registered sex offender, Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney, sex crimes, sex offender registry, criminal defense caseWhen an individual is convicted of committing a sex crime in the United States,  he or she may be required to register as a sex offender. Each state (and the District of Columbia) maintains its own sex offender registry and has its own set of laws that specify who is required to register as a sex offender within the state. For example, the statute that specifies who is required to register as a sex offender in Illinois is spelled out in code section 730 ILCS 152/115. Furthermore, each state also separately specifies the circumstances under which a registered sex offender within the state can petition to have his or her name removed from the registry.

Consider the following information regarding the limited circumstances under which an individual can petition to have his or her name removed from Illinois’ sex offender registry. Additionally, it is important to note that each situation is unique and that anyone who is interested in filing such a petition should consult with a local Illinois criminal defense lawyer about the specifics of his or her individual case.

Who is Eligible to File a Petition?

Under current Illinois law, any registered sex offender who was convicted as an adult in Illinois is generally ineligible to petition the court asking to have his or her name removed from our state’s sex offender registry. However, a registered sex offender who was tried (i.e. adjudicated) and convicted (i.e. found to be delinquent) as a minor in juvenile court can petition to have his or her name removed if he or she is able to demonstrate that he or she no longer poses a risk to the community.

In order to determine whether or not a petitioning offender poses a risk to the community the court considers a variety of factors including:

  • The offender’s history of committing sexual crimes,
  • The steps that have been taken to rehabilitate the offender,
  • The offender’s mental competence,
  • The results of the offender’s risk assessment,
  • How old the offender was when they committed the sex crime at hand, and
  • Additional factors that the court considers to be relevant.

Pardons and Wrongful Convictions

It should also be noted that an adult who was previously ordered to register as a sex offender in Illinois and who has since been pardoned for the underlying crime at issue can also petition the court to have his or her name removed from Illinois’ sex offender registry in some cases. Additionally, an individual who is found to have been wrongfully convicted of the underlying sex crime can also petition the court to remove his or her name from the registry.

Need Legal Advice? Contact a Local Criminal Defense Lawyer

If you or your minor child is interested in petitioning the court to have his or her name removed from Illinois’ sex offender registry, contact The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley at your earliest convenience. Dedicated Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney Christopher Cosley, the sole attorney at The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley, has extensive experience defending clients in criminal cases throughout the greater Chicago area and would be happy to put his skill to work for you.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=073001520K115

What is the Difference Between a Felony and a Misdemeanor?

January 22nd, 2018 at 7:22 am

 misdemeanor, criminal offenses, felony charge, Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer, infractionsIf you enjoy watching courtroom dramas on television, then you have probably heard the terms “felony” and “misdemeanor” bantered about quite a bit. Yet perhaps you were not quite sure of their precise definitions. In the legal world, the meaning of these terms are quite important as they are used to distinguish one class of criminal offenses from another.

Misdemeanors

Misdemeanors are typically crimes that are punishable by incarceration for up to one year and payment of a fine. Those who are sentenced to serve time for a misdemeanor offense are generally placed in county jail. Additionally, in certain misdemeanor trials, court appointed defense attorneys are available for defendants who cannot afford one.

Felonies

Felonies, on the other hand, fall into a more serious classification of crime and are generally punishable by incarceration in excess of one year and payment of a substantial fine. Offenders ordered to serve time for a felony offense are typically placed in a state or federal prison, as opposed to a local jail. Moreover, when an individual is charged with a felony, he or she has the right to a court appointed attorney if he or she is not able to afford legal representation.

Wobblers

It is also important to note that some criminal offenses can be tried as either a misdemeanor or as a felony. These crimes are said to be wobblers as they can wobble between being a felony or a misdemeanor. In these cases, it is within the prosecutor’s discretion whether to charge the crime as a misdemeanor or as a felony. Additionally, it is within the presiding judge’s discretion whether to sentence the crime as a misdemeanor or as a felony.

But how is it determined whether a particular offense should be tried as a felony or as a misdemeanor? This determination is highly case specific, but the decision is made based mainly on the severity of the circumstances surrounding the crime.

Infractions

Finally, there is another classification of crime that you should be aware of: infractions. An infraction (also sometimes referred to as a “violation” or a “petty offense”) is much less serious than a misdemeanor or a felony and is generally punishable with a simple fine. However, under federal law a petty offense is defined as any misdemeanor offense for which the offender can not be sentenced to serve more than six months in jail nor pay a fine of more than $5,000.

Need Legal Advice?

If you have been accused of committing a crime in Illinois, then it is a good idea to consult with a dedicated Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer about your legal options as soon as possible. At The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley we understand how overwhelming it can be to be charged with a crime and are committed to helping each of our clients through the trying process of defending themselves against such accusations.

Source:

https://www.law.cornell.edu/wex/wobbler

FAQs About Burglary Tool Possession in Illinois

January 17th, 2018 at 9:32 am

burglary charge, burglary defense, burglary tool possession, Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer, unlawful possessionDid you know that possessing burglary tools is illegal in Illinois? This may come as a shock but burglary tool possession is a serious criminal offense that can be charged as a Class 4 felony in Illinois. However, burglary tool possession is one of those crimes that is rarely talked about and is frequently misunderstood. In order to clear up some of this confusion, a few frequently asked questions about burglary tool possession have been answered below in accordance with Illinois law.   

Q: What does it mean to illegally possess burglary tools?

A: Under code section 720 ILCS 5/19-2, a person commits the crime of unlawfully possessing burglary tools when he or she possess a tool, instrument, key, explosive, or device that can be used to break into a building (or a watercraft, house trailer, auto, railroad car, aircraft, or any structure designed to keep property safe) with the intent to enter and commit a felony or theft there within.

Q: How can I defend myself against a charge of possession of burglary tools?

A: If you have been charged with possession of burglary tools in Illinois, then the first step you should take when mounting your defense is to consult with a local criminal defense lawyer. An experienced lawyer will be able to evaluate the facts of your case and advise you about how to best proceed. If you choose to retain a lawyer,  he or she will likely argue on your behalf that you did not intent to commit a felony or theft once inside and that you were in possession of the tools at issue for a lawful purpose. However, it is important to note that your defense must be tailored to suit the facts of your case and that this is just an example of one commonly argued defense.  

Q: What is the punishment for being caught in possession of burglary tools?

A: In Illinois, being caught in possession of burglary tool is a Class 4 felony offense that is punishable by up to three years in prison and payment of a fine of up to $25,000. However, it is also possible that the offender may be sentenced to probation in lieu of serving time in prison. Therefore, anyone who has been accused of possessing burglary tools should talk with a local criminal defense lawyer without delay about how to best defend themselves and avoid serving time in prison if at all possible.

Q: I was charged with sale of burglary tools rather than possession of burglary tools, what does that mean?

A: The unlawful sale of burglary tools is a closely related crime to the unlawful possession of burglary tools; however, this crime is committed in Illinois when a person knowingly sells or transfers a key or lock pick that is designed or altered to be used for breaking into a building (or a watercraft, house trailer, auto, railroad car, aircraft, or any structure designed to keep property safe). Just like the unlawful possession of burglary tools, the unlawful sale of burglary tools also constitutes a Class 4 felony offense.

Need Legal Advice? Contact a Local Criminal Defense Lawyer

If you have been charged with a burglary-related crime in Illinois, contact the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley today. Attorney Cosley is a highly regarded Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer who defends clients against a wide range of criminal charges across Illinois.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/documents/072000050K19-2.htm

How to Fight a Protective Order in Illinois

January 15th, 2018 at 7:40 am

domestic violence, protective order, restraining order, Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer, Illinois criminal defenseAn Illinois protective order (also commonly referred to as an “order of protection” or a “restraining order”) is a court ordered civil decree that is designed to prevent future acts of domestic violence from occurring by requiring the individual listed on the order to refrain from engaging in certain enumerated acts (for example, coming within a certain distance of the petitioner, possessing a firearm, harassing, stalking, or intimidating the petitioner, etc.).

If a protective order has been issued against you, it is critical to carefully abide by each provision listed in the order. Failing to do so can land you in a world of legal trouble. To begin, you will have likely committed a Class A misdemeanor and may be sentenced to spend up to one year in jail, and pay a fine of up to $2,500. Therefore, even if you feel that the order of protection that has been issued against you is not justified, it is critical that you abide by its terms and fight the order through the appropriate legal channels.

Fighting an IL Protective Order: The Process

Upon receiving notice that a protective order has been issued against you, there are two options at your disposal; you can either fight the order in court or not. If you choose not to go to court, then you are essentially letting the order stand—the presiding judge will decide the case based solely on evidence presented by your accuser and no one will be there to tell your side of the story.

Alternatively, you can decide to fight the protective order by responding to the court papers that you were served with and telling your side of the story in court. If you decide to take this route, then you will need to progress through the following steps:

  • Step 1 – Read Through Each Document: Start by reading through all of the paperwork that you have been served with and immediately start abiding by each provision contained in the emergency order of protection, if one has been issued against you. Be sure to follow any and all instructions contained in the paperwork that you were served with.
  • Step 2 – Go to Court: When you were served with notice that a protective order petition was filed against you the paperwork that you received indicated the time and place of your court hearing. Go to court as instructed, be sure to arrive early, dress well, and bring your lawyer with you if you have hired one. During the hearing you will have the opportunity to tell your side of the story.
  • Step 3 – Wait for the Court’s Decision: After considering all of the evidence presented the presiding judge will decide whether or not to issue an order of protection against you. The judge may make this decision during the hearing or he or she may take the matter under consideration and inform you of their decision at a later date.

Has a Protective Order Been Issued Against You? Give Us a Call!

If an Illinois protective order has been issued against you, passionate Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer Christopher Cosley is available to help. At The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley, we understand that domestic violence is an emotionally charged issue and that there are always at least two sides to every story surrounding an allegation of domestic abuse. If you are interested in fighting a protective order that has been issued against you we would be happy to evaluate the circumstances surrounding the order and discuss your legal options with you.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=072000050K12-3.4

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