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Archive for the ‘DUI’ tag

Can Police Search Your Phone?

November 14th, 2019 at 10:58 am

searchImagine police pulled you over in a traffic stop. Maybe they suspect you of a DUI, or maybe they want to cite you for having a broken taillight. Whatever the reason, they approach your window and begin to question you. They may even become aggressive and demand that you hand over your phone. Perhaps they even order you to unlock it for them or provide them with your password. This is a scary situation, as everyone has personal and confidential information on their phones these days. The question is, are police allowed to search your phone?

U.S. Supreme Court Decides on Cell Phone Searches

In 2014, the U.S. Supreme Court heard the case of Riley v. California. The defendant had been stopped by police for expired registration tags on his vehicle. During the stop, the officer also learned that the defandant’s driver’s license was suspended and that he was carrying a number of firearms in his car. The officer also took his phone, which the officer claimed had further incriminating evidence on it.

The Supreme Court found in favor of the defendant and determined that police do not have the authority to search a person’s phone. The reason given for this was that modern smartphones have a wealth of information about a person. By accessing your phone, a person could determine where you live, work, what your Social Security number is, and more. The court determined this was an invasion of privacy.

However, although the Supreme Court made this ruling several years ago, there are still some instances in which police can search your phone.

When Can Police Search Your Phone?

Under the Fourth Amendment, all American citizens are protected from unlawful search and seizures. However, if law enforcement has probable cause that your phone contains evidence of a crime, they can obtain a search warrant for your phone. If a judge determines there is probable cause and issues a search warrant, you will have to relinquish your phone so law enforcement can search it.

The only time law enforcement can search your phone without a warrant is when you provide your consent. Police officers often try to get around this by demanding, instead of asking for your phone. They do so in a way that makes individuals feel as though they do not have a choice. Unfortunately, in these instances, if you give police your phone and unlock it to grant them access, even begrudgingly, you have given consent and the police can search your phone.

It is extremely important that you never give police your phone unless they have a warrant. When consent is provided, it could hurt your case if police do in fact find evidence to use against you.

Did Police Unlawfully Search Your Phone? Call Our Illinois Criminal Defense Lawyer

When police unlawfully search your phone, any evidence obtained from that search is inadmissible in court. This provides a solid defense for many offenses, including distracted driving. If you have been charged with a crime after police searched your phone, you need the help of a skilled Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer. At the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley, an attorney will always ensure your rights are upheld, and he will also get illegally obtained evidence thrown out of court. If you are facing charges, call us today at 847-394-3200 to schedule a free consultation.

 

Source:

https://scholar.google.ca/scholar_case?case=9647156672357738355&hl=en&as_sdt=6&as_vis=1&oi=scholarr

 

Is There a Lookback Period in Illinois for DUIs?

April 4th, 2019 at 8:22 pm

Illinois defense lawyer, Illinois DUI attorneyMany states have a lookback period for DUI convictions. A lookback period, which is typically five to 10 years, indicates the amount of time a DUI conviction remains on a person’s driving record. This is helpful for those charged with subsequent DUIs because the prosecution and courts can only see DUIs within that timeframe. If a person was convicted of a DUI but the conviction took place longer than the lookback period, that DUI is not considered during sentencing.

So, is there a lookback period in Illinois for DUIs?

Lookback Period in Illinois

Unfortunately, in Illinois, there is no lookback period for DUIs. If a person is convicted of a DUI, it remains on their permanent driving record. This means the prosecution and judge can charge for a subsequent DUI no matter how long ago the first conviction occurred.

However, the courts will still take into consideration the length of time between a first offense and subsequent offenses when revoking a person’s driver’s license. For this reason, it is important anyone charged with a DUI speaks to a Rolling Meadows DUI lawyer that can help them beat the charges and continue to enjoy an unblemished permanent driving record.

Court Supervision

After being found guilty of driving under the influence in Rolling Meadows, the best chance a person has at avoiding jail time and high fines is court supervision.

When a judge sentences a person to court supervision, the defendant will have certain requirements and obligations they must meet. The court will then supervise that person for a period of time to ensure they are fulfilling those obligations, such as community service. Once a person can complete their court supervision successfully and without further incidence, the charges are dismissed without a conviction.

It is important that anyone sentenced with court supervision for a DUI understands this is only possible after their first DUI. Any subsequent DUI convictions are not eligible for court supervision, even if the defendant was not ordered to court supervision previously.

It is also important for all drivers in Illinois to understand that court supervision is not only possible for first-time DUIs, but also first offenses of reckless driving. The stipulations of court supervision remain the same regardless of the charge a person is facing.

Driver’s License Revocation

While Illinois may not have a lookback period for DUIs, the length of time in between subsequent DUIs does have an effect on how long a person’s driver’s license is revoked.

First-time DUI convictions will result in a person losing their driver’s license for one year. If a person is then convicted a second time of a DUI, their license is revoked for five years, but only if 20 years have passed since their first DUI.

The only subsequent DUI convictions that will not have any effect on the amount of time a person loses their driver’s license are third and fourth convictions. After a third DUI, a person will lose their license for 10 years, regardless of how long it has been since their last DUI. After a fourth conviction, a person loses their driver’s license for the rest of their life.

Without a Lookback Period, Anyone Charged with a DUI Needs a Rolling Meadows DUI Attorney

In Rolling Meadows, even one DUI conviction has serious consequences. Not only will individuals go a year without their license, but they will also have a permanent mark on their driving record. They could even have a permanent criminal record. For these reasons, anyone charged with driving under the influence needs a dedicated Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer that can help them build a solid defense. If you have been charged with a DUI, you simply cannot take your chances with the wrong lawyer, or try to beat the charges on your own. There is simply too much at stake. Contact the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley at 847-394-3200 for your best chances at retaining your license, and your freedom. Do not face the difficulties that come with even just one DUI conviction. Call today for your free consultation.

 

Sources:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=062500050K11-501

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=073000050K5-6-3.1

Can You Refuse Field Sobriety Tests in Rolling Meadows?

January 25th, 2019 at 10:28 pm

IL defense lawyerLike every other state, in Illinois, it is illegal to drive with a blood alcohol content higher than 0.08 percent. Those found guilty of doing so will be charged with driving under the influence, or DUI. There are a few steps law enforcement take before making an arrest, though. One of those is to administer field sobriety tests. Many individuals, whether they have been charged with a DUI, or they think they are about to be, wonder if these tests are mandatory. So, can you refuse field sobriety tests in Rolling Meadows?

What Are Field Sobriety Tests?

Field sobriety tests are one tool used by law enforcement when they suspect someone is driving under the influence. While there are many field sobriety tests a police officer may ask the driver to undergo, there are generally three main ones.

The Horizontal Nystagmus Test (HGN) will involve the officer holding up an object. They will then ask the driver to follow that object with their eyes as the officer moves it from left to right. The officer will then look for when the pupil begins to exhibit ‘nystagmus’, or an involuntary jerking of the eye.

Another field sobriety test is the walk and turn test. During this test, the driver will be asked to take a number of steps, turn around using just one foot, and walk back in the direction from which they came. This test is mainly done so that the officer can observe the balance and coordination of the driver.

Lastly, the third main field sobriety test is the one leg stand test. In this test, the officer will ask the driver to stand with one foot approximately six inches off the ground. The driver will also be asked to count aloud by thousands. This test is also administered to determine the coordination and balance of the driver.

Can a Driver Refuse Field Sobriety Tests?

Any field sobriety test can be refused. However, that does not mean the driver will simply be sent on their way. Instead, they will likely be arrested. If an officer asks a driver to perform a field sobriety test, they already have the intent to arrest the driver for a DUI. They are simply trying to collect more evidence against the driver for when the case goes to court.

Still, drivers are always recommended to refuse to take field sobriety tests. While it will still likely end with an arrest, by refusing they are not providing additional evidence for the police and prosecution in the case.

Contact a Rolling Meadows Criminal Defense Lawyer for Help

Even if you have submitted to field sobriety tests and been arrested for a DUI, it is crucial that you contact a skilled Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer that can help. An experienced attorney can refute the accuracy of the tests, as well as discredit the officer’s testimony in court. If you have been arrested for a DUI, you need the best defense possible. Call us today at 847-394-3200 to get a free consultation. We will start reviewing your case right away, and prepare a defense to give you the best possible chance at a successful outcome.

 

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=062500050K11-501

Boating While Impaired in Illinois

September 20th, 2018 at 11:34 am

Cook County boating while intoxicated lawyerIn Illinois, we are lucky to be located near Lake Michigan and other smaller lakes that are sprinkled throughout the state. Nice weather often calls for days spent with family and friends on a boat. For most people, these fun activities often involve the enjoyment of alcoholic beverages. However, what most people do not think about is the potential that they may face criminal charges while driving or operating a boat under the influence of alcohol.

What Is Boating Under the Influence?

In Illinois, the same law applies to boating under the influence of alcohol as for driving under the influence (DUI). If you are operating a boat with a blood alcohol content (BAC) over .08%, you can be charged with DUI. Additionally, operating a boat under the influence of drugs can also result in a DUI charge.

Picture the vessel in which you suspect a person would get in trouble for boating under the influence. Is it a speedboat? A person can be charged with boating under the influence when operating any number of different vessels, including yachts, sailboats, personal watercrafts, fishing boats, etc. Do not get fooled into thinking you are safe from a DUI charge just because you are not on a speedboat on the lake.

Who Can Test Me?

The law in Illinois dictates that a person consents to be tested for drugs and alcohol when they choose to operate their boat on the water. A person may refuse to participate in a drug or alcohol detection test, but that refusal will likely lead to an arrest and suspension of boating privileges for up to two years.

Boats can be “pulled over” just like cars on land if law enforcement suspects that you are operating your boat under the influence of alcohol. Busy days on the water and popular holidays can even lead to a checkpoint being set up to find those who are operating their boat under the influence.

Consequences of Boating Under the Influence

Just like a DUI in a car, a DUI on a boat can land an individual in a world of trouble. Driver’s license suspension, jail time, fines and costs, and probation are just a few of the penalties that can result from a boating under the influence charge. Additionally, multiple offenses will cause a boat driver to be in more trouble and face steeper sentences.

Contact a Cook County Criminal Defense Lawyer

If you have been charged with a DUI for boating under the influence, dedicated Rolling Meadows DUI defense attorney Christopher M. Cosley can help you understand your options for defending against these charges. Contact us at 847-394-3200 to schedule a free consultation and find out how we can help you.
Sources:
http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=062500050K11-501

DUI and Driverless Cars

May 17th, 2017 at 7:27 am

driverless cars, Rolling Meadows DUI Defense AttorneyWith technology becoming more of an integral part in our vehicles, the prospect of having our roadways dominated by self-driving cars is inching closer to reality. It is not hard to identify the perks of driverless cars. Fewer accidents and less road rage incidents are what some autonomous car designers are pointing to with their investors.

One major issue developers are hoping for is that driverless cars will help solve, if not eradicate, the issue of drunk driving. In theory, one would be able get into his or her self-driving car, push some buttons, and have his or her car deliver the individual safely to his or her destination.

Yet one of the looming questions about whether a person in a driverless car is operating the vehicle for the purposes of a DUI law is the question of who is actually in control.

Autopilot or No Pilot?

One of the first instances of a fatal car accident involving a driverless car was the case where a man was killed inside of an autonomous Tesla. The individual had the car on autopilot when the accident happened. Tesla pointed to the fact that even though the car was in autopilot mode, the driver was still required to have his or her hands on the steering wheel and was responsible for the trajectory of the car.

The legal question then becomes, when a car is on autopilot who is controlling the car? Is the liability and or responsibility that of the manufacturer of the software or the driver who gave the car the directions of where to go?

DUI Law and Physical Control

DUI laws across the nation generally have one factor in common: laws require a person to be in actual physical control of a vehicle for him or her to be guilty of a DUI. This can present a legal paradox. Currently, if a police officer sees a car swerving erratically, there is little question with regard to who is in control of the car. Yet how will the same play out when a driver insists a car was driving itself?

Although autonomous vehicles are still a relatively new design, with little legal precedent set as of yet, it is not likely that the “car was doing the driving,” excuse is going to get you out of hot water.

Rolling Meadows DUI Defense

If you or a loved one has been charged with a DUI, please understand the seriousness of the charge. A DUI conviction can land you in jail, get your license suspended, or prevent you from getting certain professional licenses. Contact your Rolling Meadows DUI defense attorney at the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley to schedule your consultation. Call 847-394-3200 today.

Sources:

https://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/02/business/joshua-brown-technology-enthusiast-tested-the-limits-of-his-tesla.html

https://www.isp.state.il.us/traffic/drnkdriving.cfm

Driving on a Suspended License in Illinois Can Mean Big Trouble

March 22nd, 2017 at 7:59 am

suspended license, Rolling Meadows Criminal Defense LawyerAfter your driver’s license has been suspended, either for racking up too many points for traffic violations or getting a DUI, there can be many pressures to continue driving without a license. It may be difficult to find alternative transportation to your job or to school. Or, taking public transit may be a challenge. You may be concerned about asking your friends or family to drive you because you do not want to be an inconvenience. However, if the state has suspended your driver’s license and you choose to continue driving despite being legally stripped of your driving privileges, you can face serious consequences if you are caught by law enforcement.

Driving on a suspended driver’s license is a criminal offense in Illinois under 625 ILCS 5/6-303. The charges are usually a Class A misdemeanor, but you could possibly be charged with a felony under certain circumstances. Whether you are charged with a misdemeanor or a felony will depend on the reason why your driver’s license was suspended in the first place.

There Are Serious Consequences for Driving on a Suspended License

Driving on a suspended license is not a small offense like a traffic ticket. It is a criminal offense that could put you in jail and could saddle you with a large fine. It also means that you might be sentenced to do community service and you will have a criminal record. It is possible that it could also take even longer to get your driving privileges reinstated because the Secretary of State will extend your driver’s license suspension period if you are convicted of driving on a suspended driver’s license. There is also the chance that your license could be permanently revoked.

There are other consequences that go along with a driving on a suspended license conviction. For instance, if the offense was a felony level offense, it could prevent you from voting, getting certain jobs, running for political or governmental office, getting certain business licenses, and even owning a gun.

There are nuances in the law and certain rules and procedures that need to be followed as you try to get your driver’s license reinstated. An experienced license reinstatement attorney can be a huge help in making sure that you do not make any mistakes that could make your situation worse. Do not take a chance by not having legal representation. Contact a lawyer as soon as you can to help you handle this matter.

Speak with a Driver’s License Reinstatement Lawyer About Getting Your License Back

If you have had your driving privileges suspended by the state of Illinois, then you need to look into getting your driver’s license reinstated. An experienced Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer can help you get everything in order to your driver’s license back as soon as you possibly can.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=062500050K6-303

First Time DUI Offender in Illinois? Here’s What You Can Expect to Happen

March 6th, 2017 at 9:51 am

first time DUI offender, Rolling Meadows DUI lawyerBeing arrested for driving under the influence (DUI) can be scary, especially if you are a first time offender. You are likely unfamiliar with the DUI arrest and charging process, have little idea what happens next, and could use assistance to get through the process. Do not worry: an experienced criminal defense lawyer is able to help you throughout each step of your case.

What Can You Expect Happens Next?

Driver’s License Suspension. Once you have been booked and have had a chance to find a criminal defense lawyer, your driver’s license will be revoked. Driver’s license revocation is an automatic consequence of a DUI charge. If you quickly find a lawyer after being arrested for DUI, your lawyer can get to work preparing a petition for a hearing to rescind your driver’s license suspension.

First time DUI offenders also are able to apply for a monitoring device driving permit, which involves the installation of a breath alcohol ignition interlock device at the offender’s own expense that enables them to drive.

Arraignment Hearing. Shortly after the arrest, you will also have a hearing where the charges against you will be made clear. At this court appearance, your lawyer officially declares that he or she is your legal representative.

Strategy. You will talk with your lawyer and figure out what is the best criminal defense strategy for you. In some cases, it makes the most sense to work out a plea bargain with the prosecution. Other times, it makes the most sense to fight the charges that are pending against you. You may have a valid defense and believe that taking your case to court is the best option. Your lawyer will fight for you regardless of which path you choose.

Pre-trial Motions. If you decide to go on with a criminal trial, your lawyer will then work together with the prosecution to exchange evidence and other relevant materials so that your lawyer can prepare pre-trial motions. Pre-trial motions are motions to the court in advance of an actual criminal trial that attack certain deficiencies in the case. The point of pretrial motions is to either get the case dismissed or to prepare the case better for trial.

Criminal Trial. Next, you will have your criminal trial. This will be the formal trial where the elements of the alleged crime will be demonstrated (or not) by the prosecution, and your defense to your charges will be presented by your lawyer. You trial might be a jury trial or simple a trial before a judge. After the trial has concluded, a verdict will be rendered concerning your guilt or innocence.

Sentencing Hearing. If you are found guilty, there will be a sentencing hearing where the consequences of your DUI conviction will be handed down to you. At this hearing, your lawyer will work hard to present mitigating factors and other reasons why the judge should be lenient in your sentencing.

First Time DUI Offenders Should Call The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley

First time DUI offenders need the help of an experienced criminal defense lawyer to help them fight their charges. Please do not hesitate to contact a Rolling Meadows DUI lawyer immediately for assistance with your case.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=062500050K11-501

Reasons Why Your Driver’s License Could be Suspended or Revoked

January 9th, 2017 at 7:00 am

Driver’s License Suspended, Rolling Meadows License Revocation and Suspension LawyerIn Illinois, one of the most commonly imposed penalties for misdeeds is to suspend or revoke an individual’s driving privileges. There are countless ways in which you could lose your driver’s license in Illinois; therefore, understanding why your license could be suspended or revoked is important.

Refusal to Submit to Chemical Testing

Under Illinois’s Implied Consent Law, anyone who drives on the roadways in Illinois has given implied consent to submit to chemical testing in the event that he or she is suspected by law enforcement of driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol. However, Illinois drivers have the right to refuse chemical testing.

One consequence of refusing chemical testing is that your driver’s license will be suspended for at least six months. If you refuse to submit to chemical testing after being involved in an automobile accident where you are suspected of driving under the influence, your driving privileges will be revoked for at least one year.

Arrested for DUI or Contributing to a DUI

When a driver is arrested for driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol, where the driver’s blood alcohol content is 0.08 percent or more, then his or her driving privileges will be suspended for at least six months, or potentially longer depending on whether or not the driver refuses to submit to chemical testing (as discussed above), and whether the driver is a repeat offender.

Additionally, if you are found to have contributed to someone else driving under the influence, for example, you let a drunk person drive your car, you can then be charged with contributing to a  DUI. In addition to potential jail time and a fine, another consequence for contributing to a DUI is that your driving privileges will be suspended.

Committing Driver’s License or ID Card Fraud

Suspension or revocation of a person’s driver’s license is one of the consequences associated with committing driver’s license or ID card fraud in Illinois. Any one of the following can lead to the suspension or revocation of a person’s driver’s license for no less than 12 months:

  • Presenting false identification when trying to obtain a driver’s license or ID card in Illinois;
  • Using a driver’s license or driving permit that has been unlawfully altered or that is fake;
  • Applying your signature to a driver’s license or ID card application that you know contains false information;
  • Using someone else’s driver’s license or ID card as if it were your own; or
  • Permitting someone else to use your identification documents in order to apply for a driver’s license or ID card.

When You Need Your Driver’s License Back, Call Us

A driver’s license suspension or revocation is a punishment that is often tacked on as an additional penalty for many offenses. If your driver’s license has been suspended or revoked in Illinois, it is important that you work with a driver’s license reinstatement attorney to make sure that you do everything that you need to in order to get your driver’s license back as soon as possible. A passionate Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer can help.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=062500050K11-501.1

Law Against Driving While High On Marijuana Changed

September 15th, 2016 at 1:24 pm

Law Against Driving While High On Marijuana ChangedUntil recently, it was illegal to drive while under the influence of marijuana, regardless of how much marijuana was in your system. Illinois law used to employ a zero tolerance approach when it came to driving under the influence of marijuana. Specifically, if any amount of marijuana was detected in the suspected drugged driver’s system, the driver could be charged with a marijuana DUI. But the recent passage of Illinois bill SB2228 changes things and puts a measurable limit on when an Illinois driver is too high to drive.

Under the old law, prosecutors were not required to demonstrate that the driver was actually intoxicated by marijuana at the time of their DUI arrest, according to a recent article in the Pekin Daily Times. Instead, the prosecution only had to show that marijuana, even in trace amounts, was detected in the driver’s system. A blood test could be used to analyze a blood sample for any trace of THC, which is the active psychoactive chemical ingredient in marijuana.

A Zero Tolerance Policy Is Patently Unfair

The old law was strikingly unfair since it failed to require proof that the driver was actually under the influence of marijuana to such a degree that the intoxication impacted the driver’s ability to safely operate a vehicle. The old law could place a person who was merely in contact with marijuana smoke in violation of the state’s marijuana DUI laws, even though the person never actually inhaled more than second-hand marijuana smoke.

New Law Offers Measurable Legal Limit

The new law places a quantifiable measurement on when a person is considered to be under the influence of marijuana to such a degree that their driving ability is affected. Specifically, a person who has five nanograms of THC in their blood, when the blood sample is taken within two hours of a DUI arrest, is considered to be under the influence of marijuana and is not safe to drive a vehicle. With the enactment of the new marijuana DUI law, Illinois joins just four other states – Colorado, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington – that have placed a measurable impairment level on marijuana.

Bill SB2228 Also Decriminalizes Possession of Small Quantities of Marijuana

The new law also decriminalizes possession of small quantities of marijuana. Instead of being a criminal offense, possession of less than 10 grams of marijuana is punishable as a civil infraction, meaning that offenders will merely be issued a ticket. The ticket ranges from between a fine of $100 and $200.

Facing A DUI? Contact A Rolling Meadows Drug Offenses Lawyer

Whether you are facing a DUI, a marijuana DUI, or drug charges, you need to speak to an experienced Rolling Meadows drug crimes lawyer as soon as feasible about your situation. These criminal charges are serious, and you need legal representation that can help you fight the charges that are pending against you.

Sources:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/BillStatus.asp?DocNum=2228&GAID=13&DocTypeID=SB&SessionID=88&GA=99
http://www.pekintimes.com/news/20160804/marijuana-dui-law-changed-little-attorney-warns

Can the Police Take Your Blood When You are Suspected of DUI?

August 30th, 2016 at 7:04 am

Can the Police Take Your Blood When You are Suspected of DUIWhen you are suspected of driving while under the influence, law enforcement may request that you submit to blood alcohol concentration testing. While this testing often takes the form of a breathalyzer test, where a breath sample is analyzed for its alcohol content, sometimes blood testing is requested to determine a suspected drunk driver’s blood alcohol concentration. Blood samples are taken in one of two ways, either as part of a DUI kit that is completed at a hospital or as part of an emergency blood draw.

  • DUI Kit Blood Samples. When blood is taken as part of a DUI kit, the arresting police officer must request the blood test and the driver must consent to the blood draw. The test must be done at a hospital by a qualified medical professional (i.e., a registered nurse, licensed physician, certified paramedic or trained phlebotomist). Urine samples are often also collected when a driver completes a DUI kit.
  • Emergency Blood Draws. Emergency blood draws that are taken while a suspected drunk driver is receiving emergency medical treatment and can be used as evidence in DUI cases. These are blood samples that are taken as a matter of routine when a person receives emergency medical services.

Must I Consent to Blood Testing?

Under Illinois implied consent law, anyone who uses the state’s public roads automatically gives consent to chemical testing in suspected DUI situations. However, drivers do have a right to refuse such tests, but there will be consequences for doing so. In particular, a driver that refuse testing will have their driver’s license suspended for a certain period of time.

Fighting the Use of Blood Evidence in DUI Cases

There are plenty of reasons why it might be important for a person charged with a DUI to fight the use of blood testing results as evidence in a DUI case. The test results might show a blood alcohol concentration level that is above the legal limit of 0.08%, or the blood test results could show that the driver was under the influence of drugs. There are many ways that a skilled DUI criminal defense lawyer can fight the use of blood test results as evidence in a DUI case. For instance:

  • Your lawyer could demand proof of custody of the blood sample every step of the way through the testing process. This means that if the prosecution cannot show that the sample was in the appropriate chain of custody (i.e., only people who were authorized to handle the blood sample ever touched it), the sample cannot be used as evidence.
  • Your lawyer may be able to present evidence that medication you took or alcohol from an alcohol swab administered before your blood draw interfered with the accuracy of your blood sample.
  • If appropriate, your lawyer may be able to argue that proper protocol was not followed by law enforcement when making your DUI arrest, the medical professional who drew the blood sample, or the lab technician when performing analysis on your blood sample.

Call the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley

If you are facing DUI charges and there is chemical testing evidence in your case, please contact a Rolling Meadows DUI lawyer immediately. Call the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley. Our phone number is (847) 394-3200.

Sources:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=062500050K11-501.2
http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/documents/062500050K11-501.4.htm
http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=062500050K11-501.1

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