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Archive for the ‘distracted driving’ tag

Teen Drivers Face Stricter Driving Laws

June 29th, 2018 at 6:26 am

distracted driving, Illinois traffic offenses, Rolling Meadows traffic ticket attorney, teen drivers, teen driving lawsFew things compare in a young person’s life to finally being able to drive a car on his or her own. He or she has taken driver’s training, driven the required amount of hours with an experienced driver, and can now drive on his or her own. However, with this freedom comes an added responsibility.

Since teen drivers are so new and inexperienced, they face stricter rules and regulations in an effort to keep the driver, and those around them, safe.

Cell Phone Use

In Illinois, a driver is not permitted to be on his or her cell phone or other handheld device while driving. He or she can only make calls with a hands-free option. However, the rule is different for teen drivers. A driver under the age of 18 is not permitted to use a cell phone while driving at all, even if the device is hands-free. The only exception is in the event the driver needs to call 911 or otherwise contact emergency services or the police.

Passengers

A new driver is likely to be more susceptible to distractions while driving. The teen needs to keep his or her attention on the road so that he or she can get valuable experience driving. Illinois has passenger limits for teen drivers. For the first year after obtaining a driver’s license, a driver under the age of 18 is only allowed to have one other young person in the vehicle with him or her. A young person includes anyone under the age of 20.

In addition to limiting the number of passengers permitting in the vehicle, seat belts are enforced for every person in the vehicle. Illinois law requires all drivers to wear a seat belt while driving. However, teen drivers must also ensure that their passengers under the age of 18 wear seatbelts.

Driving Curfew

Teen drivers are not allowed to drive at all times throughout the day. On Friday and Saturday nights, drivers under the age of 18 are not permitted to drive between the hours of 11 p.m. and 6 a.m. the following morning. During the week, the curfew is 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. There are many exceptions to this curfew. Driving with a parent or guardian, driving to or from school, driving to or from work, driving in the event of an emergency, and driving for religious purposes are just some of the reasons teens can drive after curfew.

Let Us Help You Today

Teen driving laws are slightly different than adult laws. If your teen has received a traffic violation, The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley can help. Dedicated Rolling Meadows traffic ticket attorney Christopher Cosley knows that young drivers can sometimes make mistakes. Our team works hard so that one mistake does not follow your child everywhere.

Sources:

http://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/departments/drivers/traffic_safety/safetybelts.html

http://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/departments/drivers/teen_driver_safety/gdl.html

Illinois Legislature Considering Stricter Penalties for Texting Drivers

June 22nd, 2018 at 7:52 am

Illinois traffic offenses, moving violations, Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney, texting and driving, texting driversIt should come as no surprise that driving with any type of distraction is dangerous to you and everyone else on the roadways. One of the biggest distractions plaguing drivers is the number of drivers who are texting and driving. Concluded in a study by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, texting drivers can be six times more dangerous than drivers operating a vehicle under the influence of alcohol or drugs.

Because of the dangerous nature of texting and driving, and other types of distracted driving, Illinois lawmakers have imposed a bill that would make texting and driving offenses more serious, according to My Stateline. In 2014, Illinois passed a law that made first time texting and driving offenses a nonmoving violation. House Bill 4846 changes this law and makes texting and driving a moving offense. The bill passed in the House and moved to the Illinois Senate for consideration and vote. Bill 4846 was also passed by the Senate.

With the offense classification changing from a nonmoving violation to a moving violation, the penalties for such offense have increased. In Illinois, moving violations result in various fines and court costs. However, a person who received three moving violations in a 12-month period risks having his or her license suspended.

Distracted Driving in Illinois

Distracted driving is a problem across the country. In Illinois, it is not just illegal to text and drive. Any use of cell phones or electronic communications is prohibited while operating a motor vehicle. Drivers over the age of 19 are allowed to use hands-free or Bluetooth enabled devices, but should be wary of the dangers that still exist. Even without physically touching a cell phone or handheld device, a driver is likely taking his or her eyes off of the road and putting himself or herself at increased risks of accidents.

Minimize Distractions

Illinois urges drivers to minimize distractions while they drive. Consider the following tips to help prevent an accident and keep you safe:

  • Do not use a cell phone or handheld device;
  • Only operate a vehicle if you are not drowsy or overly tired;
  • Do not overly populate your vehicle; and.
  • Pull over to take a phone call or adjust the GPS

We Are Here to Help You

Even knowing the dangers associated with texting a driving, there are many drivers who still violate the law. With the harsher classification of a moving violation and the risk of a license suspension, contacting a skilled traffic attorney could benefit you immensely.

Passionate Rolling Meadows defense attorney Christopher M. Cosley is here to help you with tickets for traffic offenses, including texting and driving. Your driving record is important. As such, you need an attorney who understands that importance and fights to get you the best possible outcome under the circumstances. Contact us today for a consultation.

Sources:

http://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/departments/drivers/traffic_safety/distracted.html

http://www.mystateline.com/news/new-illinois-legislation-proposes-tougher-penalties-for-texting-and-driving/1128952249

Illinois State Police Strictly Enforce FATAL-4 Moving Violations

April 10th, 2017 at 7:00 am

moving violations, Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorneyThe Illinois state police are motivated to help reduce instances of automobile accidents and traffic fatalities in and around Rolling Meadows, Illinois. That is why state law enforcement focuses on four moving violations known as the “FATAL-4”, which are four moving violations that pose the highest rate of causing traffic fatalities.

Law enforcement looks particularly closely for signs that drivers are committing any of the FATAL-4 driving offenses. The traffic offenses that make up the FATAL-4 include:

  1. Driving under the influence of drugs and/or alcohol. Under 625 ILCS 5/11-501, it is illegal to drive a motor vehicle while under the influence of drugs and/or alcohol in Illinois. A person is considered to be too drunk to drive when he or she has a blood alcohol concentration of 0.08 percent or if his or her ability to safely operate the vehicle is compromised. Driving while under the influence impacts a driver’s ability to judge distance and speed and can render a driver incapable of operating his or her vehicle safely.
  2. Speeding. Driving faster than the posted speed limit or faster than road conditions or weather conditions allow is illegal in Illinois under 625 ILCS 5/11-601. Drivers have a duty to reduce speed when approaching crossings, intersections, going around curves, approaching a crest in the road, approaching hazards, when pedestrians are visible, or whenever traffic conditions indicate a need to slow down. Speeding by a certain degree above the posted speed limit can carry certain penalties proportionate to the offense. For instance, there is a specific statute concerning speeding when the driver is going more than 26 miles per hour over the posted speed limit.
  3. Engaging in distracted driving. Whether it is texting while driving, tuning the radio, or fiddling with center console controls for the heating or air conditioning in the vehicle, when a driver is not paying full attention to the task of driving, the driver is distracted. Distractions take many forms, and they can disrupt a driver’s concentration and focus. Driving is a dangerous activity when the driver is not paying attention to what is occurring on the road around them. Distracted drivers are often incapable of reacting to circumstances on the road, which can result in accidents.
  4. Seat belt compliance. Seat belt compliance laws are strictly enforced by police because use of a driver or passenger restraining device, such as a seat belt, during an accident can help save lives and reduce injuries. Seat belt compliance citations are often tacked on to other moving violations after a police officer notices that the driver or passenger was not fastened into his or her seat with a seat belt.

Contact Us for Professional Help

If you are facing criminal charges for a DUI, or a traffic citation for speeding or engaging in distracted driving, you need an experienced Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer to help you fight your charges. There is much at stake if you are convicted. Make sure to contact a lawyer immediately.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=062500050K11-501

Texting While Driving…A Bus

November 3rd, 2013 at 12:55 pm

We have all heard that texting while driving is dangerous, and that texting distracts drivers and endangers passengers and other drivers on the road. No one wants their child in a vehicle while the driver is texting or otherwise distracted from the road.

Texting While Driving a BusWhat about a vehicle with a bunch of child passengers and a texting driver? One Florida school bus driver decided to use her cell phone while driving a bus full of middle school students home from school.

A 14-year-old girl pulled out her phone to record her bus driver swearing and yelling at the students, but instead caught the driver texting.

In the video, the driver was shown driving with one hand on the wheel and the other holding her phone, texting. Her eyes were on the phone, not on the road.

ABC news reported on the video in which the bus driver jerked the wheel, apparently after drifting into another lane, and then continued to text.

This bus driver has been suspended for violating the school districts policy, but Florida’s texting while driving law does not go into effect until October, and even then, it excludes bus drivers, who will be under the power of the school that they work for.

Florida will become the forty second state in the United States to treat texting while driving as a primary traffic offense, according to the Governors Highway Traffic Association, which also listed Washington D.C., and other United States territories in the list with the 41 states.

The Inquisitr reported that over 3,000 people were killed due to distracted driving accidents in 2011.

If you have been accused of distracted driving, contact a Chicago criminal defense attorney for assistance. Attorney Chris Cosley will help you through your criminal court case for texting while driving near Rolling Meadows, Illinois today.

 

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