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Archive for the ‘Traffic attorney’ Category

Traffic Ticket FAQs

August 7th, 2019 at 9:48 am

IL traffic ticket attorneyAny time someone is pulled over for a traffic ticket, they have many questions. Will they have to go to court? Will they lose their license? Is traffic safety school an option? These are just a few of the most common questions criminal defense attorneys in Rolling Meadows are asked every day. The answers to them, and to other frequently asked questions about traffic tickets, are below.

What Should I Do if I Am Pulled Over?

If you are pulled over, it is best to cooperate with police. Turn off your engine and radio, and keep your hands visible. Do not reach for your driver’s license or insurance information until the officer asks to see them. Remain calm and friendly, and do not argue with the officer.

Do not admit guilt, even if the officer asks if you know why they pulled you over. The officer could be recording your response so they can use it against you later in court. Cooperate fully and, if the officer issues a traffic ticket, contact an attorney.

Do I Need an Attorney for a Traffic Ticket?

For certain offenses, such as driving over 26 miles per hour the posted speed limit, you will absolutely need an attorney to represent you in court. Sometimes though, even minor traffic offenses will require an attorney, depending on the facts of your case, such as if you have several points on your license already. After receiving any traffic ticket, you should call an attorney that can advise you of your legal options.

Will I Have to Go to Court?

Your traffic ticket will state whether you have to attend court for the offense. In most cases, drivers only have to appear if a conviction will result in jail time or an automatic license suspension. However, mailing in payment for the offense is considered a guilty plea. This is entered onto your public driving record, which can place you at risk for suspension in the future. As such, you may choose to go to court to fight the ticket, even if you are not required to.

Will I Lose My License?

In Illinois, drivers over the age of 21 that receive convictions for three moving violations in the span of one year will likely have their license suspended. Drivers under the age of 21 must only have two convictions for moving violations over the course of two years to have their license suspended. Certain offenses include penalties of automatic license suspension. These offenses include passing a stopped school bus or failing to yield to an emergency vehicle.

Will My Auto Insurance Rates Increase?

If you are convicted of a traffic violation, your auto insurance rates will likely increase. The amount they increase will depend on the nature of the situation and the offense you received the ticket for. If the ticket is dismissed, you are placed on court supervision, or are found not guilty, the offense is not made part of your public driving record. As such, your auto insurance rates will not increase.

Is Traffic Safety School an Option?

Individuals with a clean driving record are sometimes placed on court supervision and given the opportunity to attend traffic safety school. This is a good option, as you will not be convicted of the offense, and the ticket will not appear on your public driving record. As such, you will be less likely to lose your license in the future, and your insurance rates will not increase. While you may be able to request traffic safety school by mail, these cases are most successful when you appear in court to make the request.

Contact an Illinois Criminal Defense Lawyer for Help with Your Ticket

Getting a traffic ticket does not sound like a major event to many. However, under certain circumstances, traffic tickets can have a very detrimental impact on those that receive them. If you have received a ticket and are worried about losing your license or have to appear in court, you must speak with our skilled Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyers today. Call the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley at 847-394-3200 or contact us online for your free consultation. We will help prepare you for court and give you the best chance of keeping your license.

 

Sources:

https://www.einsurance.com/insurance-guide/illinois/auto-insurance/

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs4.asp?DocName=062500050HCh.+6+Art.+II&ActID=1815&ChapterID=49&SeqStart=85500000&SeqEnd=87500000

Scott’s Law: Move Over or Possibly Lose Your License

May 30th, 2019 at 5:09 pm

IL traffic attorneyIn the first two and a half months of the year, 13 State Troopers have been hit by vehicles while working on the side of the road. In early January, one was fatally struck and killed while working the scene of an accident. The number is too high in the state, and Illinois State Police are trying to change that. With a blitz on social media, they are reminding all drivers about Scott’s Law, and what can happen if they fail to comply and reduce speed to avoid an accident.

Scott’s Law

According to 625 ILCS 5/11-907, Scott’s Law requires all motorists to move to another lane when approaching an emergency vehicle on the side of the road. The law was named after Lieutenant Scott Gillen, a firefighter with the Chicago Fire Department that lost his life after being struck by a passing vehicle while he was working the scene of an emergency. It is also sometimes called simply the “Move Over Law.”

The law applies to any vehicle that has flashing lights, a siren, or both. Police vehicles are the most common emergency vehicles seen along the side of the road, but the law also applies to ambulances, firefighters, and even tow trucks in some cases. Construction vehicles could also fall under the definition of emergency vehicle according to Scott’s Law definition. Motorists wishing to keep safe, and avoid penalties, should simply move over when approaching flashing lights ahead.

The law only states that drivers must move to another lane if the lights or siren on the emergency vehicle are activated. When changing lanes is unsafe, drivers are expected to slow down and proceed with due caution past the emergency vehicles.

Penalties for Violating Scott’s Law

Drivers found in violation of Scott’s Law will face mandatory fines. The minimum fine is $100, but that cost could increase to $10,000, depending on the nature of the violation and if the driver caused an accident when failing to move over.

However, drivers found in violation of this law will face more than just fines. They could potentially lose their license for a long time, depending on the circumstances.

If the driver caused an accident that involved property damage, the Secretary of State will revoke the driver’s license for 90 days. If the driver caused an accident resulting in injury, the driver will lose their license for 180 days. If the driver caused a fatal accident, the driver’s license is suspended for two years. They could also face other charges as well, such as involuntary manslaughter.

Contact a Rolling Meadows License Reinstatement Lawyer to Get Your License Back

If you have had your license revoked due to Scott’s Law or any other traffic violation, you need to contact a skilled Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney. At the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley, we are very familiar with the state’s system for revoking, and reinstating, licenses. We want to put that experience to work for you and help you get your license back as quickly as possible. Call us today at 847-394-3200 for a free consultation and we can begin discussing your case.

 

Source:

https://chicago.cbslocal.com/2019/03/19/illinois-police-report-troopers-struck/

New Year, New Rules of the Road in Illinois

February 12th, 2019 at 12:04 am

IL traffic lawyerMost drivers believe they know the rules of the road. These rules include driving under posted speed limits, stopping at traffic lights, and following all road signs, such as school crossings. However, many new traffic rules will come into effect over the course of 2019. Drivers need to ensure they are familiar with these rules as well. If they are not and are found in violation of these new laws, they could be facing hefty fines and other penalties.

New Texting and Driving Laws

Perhaps the most important law that will be introduced later in the year is the new penalties imposed on drivers found in violation of texting and driving. This law, which stems from Illinois House Bill 4846, will come into effect on July 1, 2019.

Texting and driving has been illegal in Illinois since 2014. The new law though, will now consider texting and driving a moving violation rather than a non-moving violation. Moving violations are entered into a person’s driving record. When a person is convicted of three moving violations within a 12-month period, their licenses are also subject to suspension. A first offense carries the same penalty of $75.

Children Under Two Must Ride in Rear-Facing Car Seats

Before January 1, 2019, Illinois law required that all children under the age of eight be restrained in a car seat. Previously, the law did not state which way that child restraint system had to face in the vehicle. Under the new law, which took effect on New Year’s Day, all children under the age of two must ride in rear-facing car seats. Children under the age of two and taller than 40 inches in height, or weighing more than 40 pounds, may sit in a front-facing car seat.

Those found in violation of this law will be subject to fines and penalties at the discretion of the officer that pulls them over. These penalties could include $75 for a first offense and up to $200 for a second offense.

Driver Curriculum will Include the “Dutch Reach” Method

While not necessarily a new law, those reading the Illinois’ Rules of the Road manual will now be encouraged to use the “Dutch Reach” method after parallel parking. This method states that when exiting a vehicle, drivers and passengers alike should reach across their body to open the door. This, it is believed, will help prevent more instances of “dooring,” as it will remind those in vehicles to look first for pedestrians and bicyclists that may be in the path of the door.

School Bus Signs Must be Covered

According to Illinois House Bill 3292, when school buses are not being used to transport school children under the age of 18, for religious purposes, or for any other activity not affiliated with a church or school, the “School Bus” sign must be covered or concealed.

In addition, the signal arm and the flashing lights of a school bus should not be operated when the bus is being used for the same types of activities. This law also came into effect on January 1, 2019.

Contact a Rolling Meadows Traffic Lawyer 

Too many people believe that if they are pulled over and found in violation of certain laws, they have no choice but to pay the fines and face other penalties. This, however, is not the case.

If you are found in violation of any new traffic laws, or any other traffic law, contact a skilled Rolling Meadows traffic attorney that can help. At the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley, we can provide you with the legal defense you need to ensure you are not at risk for losing your license or paying large fines for violations you did not commit. Contact us today at 847-394-3200 for your free consultation.

 

Sources:

http://ilga.gov/legislation/fulltext.asp?DocName=&SessionId=91&GA=100&DocTypeId=HB&DocNum=4846&GAID=14&LegID=110209&SpecSess=&Session=

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/fulltext.asp?DocName=&SessionId=91&GA=100&DocTypeId=HB&DocNum=3293&GAID=14&LegID=105016&SpecSess=&Session=

Three Things to Keep in Mind When Dealing With Traffic Tickets in Cook County

July 23rd, 2018 at 12:18 pm

drivers license points, Rolling Meadows traffic ticket attorneys, traffic offenses, traffic ticket, auto insurance ratesNo one likes receiving a traffic ticket. Seeing the red and blue lights in your rear-view mirror is likely not what you hope for when out on the road. Traffic tickets become a burden to those receiving them as they try to deal with the consequences and determine the next steps to take. No matter the inconvenience or the burden that is felt, traffic tickets cannot be ignored. 

Traffic Tickets Affect Your Insurance Rates

While it is true that there are traffic offenses that require paying a small fine and nothing more, this is not the case in every instance. The consequences of a traffic ticket can affect a person’s life even after paying the fine. Auto insurance rates are usually calculated by taking into consideration a person’s driving history. Traffic tickets and offenses increase the rates of your auto insurance that is required to drive in Illinois.

Traffic Tickets Add Points to You License

In Illinois, different traffic and driving offenses amount to “points” on a person’s driving record. The Illinois point system serves to keep track of the offenses one commits while driving and assign the appropriate punishments when necessary. The most extreme situation that can occur as a result of points being added to a driving record is the suspension or revocation of a license. Each violation, from moving violations to driving under the influence, amasses a certain amount of points. At a certain point, there are simply too many points on one’s driving record for the state of Illinois to continue to allow a person to drive on the road.

Traffic Tickets Can Result in More Than Just Fines

Many people think they can simply pay the fine associated with the ticket and move forward with their life. This is not true. As stated above, there are consequences far beyond the fine. Paying a fine will likely end your responsibility to the traffic ticket; however, it does not stop the consequences that extend further.

Contact Us Today for Help

If you have received a traffic ticket, an experienced traffic ticket attorney can help you mitigate the damages caused by the ticket and, in some cases, even get any charges dismissed.

Contact the dedicated Rolling Meadows traffic ticket attorney at The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley to help deal with your traffic ticket and advise you on getting the best possible outcome under the circumstances surrounding the ticket. 

Source:

https://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/publications/pdf_publications/dsd_dc19.pdf

Reckless Driving in Illinois

May 18th, 2018 at 10:00 am

reckless driving, traffic offenses, reckless driving charges, speeding, Class A misdemeanorWhile many believe reckless driving to be a minor offense, in reality it can lead to serious consequences that have lasting effects. As such, if you have been charged with reckless driving in Illinois, we ask you to reach out to us today for professional help.

What is Reckless Driving?

In Illinois, reckless driving is governed by statute 625 ILCS 5/11-305. There are two situations in which a person can be found guilty of reckless driving:

  1. A person who drives “with willful or wanton disregard for the safety of persons or property” is said to be driving recklessly; and
  2. A person who knowingly drives “a vehicle and uses an incline in a roadway, such as a railroad crossing, bridge approach, or hill, to cause the vehicle to become airborne” is driving recklessly.

Common examples of reckless driving include a person who is driving at a high rate of speed, someone who is driving erratically, or any other type of driving that might rise to the level of negligent driving. Driving erratically includes drivers who swerve in and out of lanes without notice and without the use of their turn signals.

Penalties in Illinois

If you are found to be driving recklessly in Illinois, the penalties are much higher than with a minor speeding ticket or traffic violation. Reckless driving is considered a Class A misdemeanor. A Class A misdemeanor carries up to 364 days in county jail and the potential for a fine up to $2,500. Additionally, a charge of reckless driving on your driving record also means points added to your license.

If you do not want to have a reckless driving charge on your driving record, there is the potential for an alternative penalty. Instead of the charge being added to the record, a driver can be placed under supervision. Supervision usually requires the payment of a fine, attendance and completion of Traffic Safety School, or both. However, once you use the supervision for the reckless driving charge, you can no longer be eligible for supervision for any additional reckless driving charges, or for a first DUI charge.

Additional Consequences to Reckless Driving

Upon conviction, you will receive fines, court costs, jail time, or possible supervision. There are other consequences to consider in a reckless driving charge, or any traffic-related offense:

  • License Suspension: The Illinois Point System has a three-strike rule. This means that if you receive three moving violations within a 12-month period, you may have your license suspended, although this may depend on your individual circumstances.
  • Increased Insurance Rates: With the addition of points on your license, your insurance premiums will likely go up.

We Can Help You Today

If you have been charged with reckless driving and want to hear about the options available to you, contact the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley. A dedicated Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney at our office is equipped with the knowledge and skill to explain your options and get the best results possible.

Sources:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=062500050K11-503

http://www.cookcountycourt.org/ABOUTTHECOURT/MunicipalDepartment/FirstMunicipalDistrictChicago/TrafficSection/CourtSupervision.aspx

The Consequences of Driving Without Insurance in Illinois

September 18th, 2017 at 9:32 am

Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney, driving without insurance, traffic offenses, Illinois traffic offense, suspended driver's licenseIn Illinois, drivers are required by the Illinois State Legislature Vehicle Code to carry at least a minimum amount of auto insurance. Currently, in order to meet our state’s auto insurance requirements, Illinois drivers must carry at least the following amounts of liability insurance:

  • $25,000 for bodily injury per person,
  • $50,000 for bodily injury coverage per accident,
  • $20,000 for property damage,
  • $25,000 for uninsured motorist bodily injury coverage per person, and
  • $50,000 for uninsured motorist bodily injury coverage per accident.

Some people mistakenly believe that driving without adequate auto insurance in Illinois is not a big deal; however, in reality, drivers who are caught failing to meet our state’s insurance requirements suffer a number of different consequences, the most severe of which are outlined below.

Fines for Driving Without Adequate Insurance

Under code section 625 ILCS 5/3-707 of the Illinois Compiled Statutes, fines for a first offense of driving without adequate auto insurance in Illinois range from $500 to $1,000 while repeat offenders are required to pay a $1,000 fine for an ordinary violation and a $2,500 fine if they were caught after causing an accident in which someone else was injured.

Additionally, Illinois residents who are convicted of driving without adequate insurance also have to pay an additional $100 reinstatement fee to get their driving privileges back if their driver’s license is suspended because they drove without adequate insurance.

Other Consequences

Illinois residents who are caught driving without adequate insurance can also have their driver’s licenses suspended. Generally speaking, a first time offender will have his or her driver’s license suspended for three months, at the end of which the license will be reinstated if the offender is able to show proof of insurance and pay the reinstatement fee.

However, each license suspension comes with certain provisions that must be abided by or else the suspension will be extended for an additional six months. Furthermore, it should be noted that driving on a suspended licenses in Illinois is a Class A misdemeanor that is punishable by up to one year in prison and a fine of up to $2,500.

Additionally, a driver who has been caught driving without adequate auto insurance may find that when he or she is able to obtain insurance, he or she will be required to pay higher insurance rates than drivers who do not have such a blemish on their record.

Consult With a Local Attorney

If you have been caught driving without adequate insurance in Illinois, then you are likely facing fines, having your driver’s license suspended, and perhaps other additional penalties. However, the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley may be able to help.

Attorney Chris Cosley is an experienced Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney who tirelessly fights for his clients’ rights and driving privileges and helps them avoid criminal convictions whenever possible. Contact the office today.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=062500050K3-707

Petty Traffic Offenses & Misdemeanors

July 3rd, 2017 at 7:00 am

petty traffic offenses, Rolling Meadows traffic violations defense lawyer, moving violations, Class C misdemeanor, suspended licenseIt is not uncommon for people to treat moving violations as inconsequential or somehow beneath notice, therefore paying the requested fine quickly and proceeding on their merry way. However, many will then receive a rude awakening as their driving privileges are affected, especially if they have a history of multiple speeding tickets or other moving violations. Therefore, it is important for Illinois drivers to be aware of the potentially punitive consequences that may result if too many tickets or citations are incurred.

Classification Differences

The significant majority of traffic offenses are characterized as either petty or as misdemeanors under Illinois law. Petty offenses are punishable with merely a fine, usually no more than $1,000, though there are always exceptions depending on the egregious nature of the conduct. Examples include driving without auto insurance and failing to wear a seat belt while driving or riding in an automobile. While a petty offense is still something to take seriously, it is the lightest type of offense that can appear on one’s record, and is the classification for which it is most likely to receive supervision or probation as a sentence instead of a particularly heavy fine.

Misdemeanors, comparatively, are more serious and may carry jail time as part or all of the sentence handed down at conviction—there are three classes of misdemeanor, A through C, with A being the most severe.

An example of a Class C misdemeanor would be drag racing, while a Class A misdemeanor would be driving without a license or on a suspended license. Class A misdemeanors are held to be more likely to injure participants or bystanders, as well as to possess an exaggerated degree of recklessness or negligence compared to petty offenses.

Misdemeanor traffic offenses may sometimes receive a sentence of court supervision, but it is decidedly less common than with those convicted of petty offenses.

Minor Offenses Can Add Up

While the relative consequences for petty and misdemeanor traffic offenses are much less significant than those associated with felonies, this does not mean that minor traffic offenses may simply be ignored, or paid and forgotten. For example, if an Illinois driver accrues three moving violations (whether petty or misdemeanor offenses) in one 12-month span, it results in an automatic, mandatory license suspension. That suspension will expire on a specific calendar date, but only if the driver’s record has been clean for that period of time.

It is also possible to receive a license suspension over failure to pay fines associated with petty offenses and misdemeanors of any class. If a driver fails to pay the costs associated with five or more automatic traffic violations, then his or her license will be automatically suspended in much the same manner as it would be with multiple moving violations on one’s record. The driver will not be able to reinstate his or her license without presenting proof that any remaining fines or penalties have been paid, and any attempt to drive without reinstating his or her license may result in a re-suspension (as driving on a suspended license is in itself a suspendable offense).

Consult a Knowledgeable Illinois Criminal Defense Attorney

Because traffic offenses are seen as such relatively inconsequential affairs, it can be a momentous shock when your license is suspended over the amount of these minor offenses. Consulting an attorney with experience in such matters can greatly ease one’s mind, or at least articulate exactly what one faces in the near future.

The dedicated Rolling Meadows traffic violations defense lawyer at The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley is well versed in this specific area of law, and is happy to try and assist you with your case. Contact the office today to set up an initial consultation.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/documents/062500050K12-603.1.htm

City Admits Wrongdoing When Trying to Fix Previous Error on Red Light Tickets

June 26th, 2017 at 7:00 am

red light tickets, Rolling Meadows traffic ticket lawyer, speeding tickets, traffic offenses, traffic violationsThe city of Chicago had inaccuracies on 1.9 million red light and speed-camera tickets. In an attempt to correct this mistake, it appears that Mayor Rahm Emanuel may have exacerbated the issue.

City Hall sent mail to recipients of the red light and speed camera tickets. The letters received attempted to offer another chance to appeal the tickets in court. The measure is widely identified as an effort to ward off a class-action lawsuit, pleading that the city failed to provide ticket holders enough time or notice to challenge their tickets.

One Cook County resident received five red light camera tickets for which she could only make out two of the videos. She was quoted as saying, “It’s alarming that they would do something like this.”

An official spokesman, Michael Claffey, indicated that the process to correct the fault in the system denying people adequate notice to contest their tickets would take considerable time to rectify.

Cook County offered no explanation for the issue, but opined that the malfunction might have been a result of the high traffic on the city’s website. The offer from the city to allow ticket holders another opportunity to appeal their tickets comes after a Cook County Circuit Judge denied a motion from the city to dismiss a class-action suit alleging the city violated due process by failing to provide adequate notice.

A Chicago attorney stated, “the Emanuel administration’s effort to force people to relitigate the city’s illegal behavior is a sham.” That same attorney explained that out of the 37 cases related to these red light cameras, 18 had no photographs or videos.

Need to Contest a Red Light Camera Ticket?

If you or a loved one has received a ticket in the mail from a red light camera or speed camera, you may have an opportunity to fight it. Rolling Meadows traffic ticket lawyer Christopher M. Cosley is an experienced and proven defense lawyer who represents his clients in a litany of issues relating to traffic violations.

Do not blindly accept that you have no options when you receive a ticket. Call The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley at 847-394-3200 to schedule your initial consultation. Or, visit our website www.cosleycriminaldefense.com. Our 24-hour answering service is designed to get you the advice you need when you need it.

Source:

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/watchdog/redlight/ct-red-light-camera-notices-0108-20170106-story.html

Traffic Citations and Your Driving Record in Illinois

May 24th, 2017 at 7:13 am

traffic citations, Rolling MeadowsStandard moving violations will usually stay on your driving record for up to five years from the time you are convicted, according to the Illinois Secretary of state. Standard moving violations include:

  • Speeding;
  • Disobeying a stop sign;
  • Disobeying a traffic light; and
  • Improper lane usage.

However, traffic violations whose penalties result in a suspension or revocation can stay on your driving record for at least seven years. That timeline will not start until the date you get your license reinstated.  The caveat to that general rule are traffic violations that include alcohol or drugs, like a DUI for example. Those kinds of convictions may stay on your Illinois driving record for the rest of your life.

Is There Any Way I Can Keep a Traffic Ticket Off My Driving Record?

That is a question for your Cook County traffic violation attorney. Generally, the only way to accomplish that is to receive court supervision as a punishment for your traffic violation or getting the charge dropped or dismissed.

Traffic violation convictions not only cause your insurance rates to increase but they also count as points towards getting your license suspended. When faced with a traffic violation, it is important that you speak with an experienced and knowledgeable traffic violation defense lawyer to give you the best shot at keeping traffic infractions off of your record.

Understand Your Rights

It is important that you understand what rights you have at a traffic stop. When a police officer stops you and begins asking questions, it is usually not polite conversation. He or she is beginning their investigation into whether or not you have committed a moving violation or a more serious offense.

The majority of convictions in Illinois occur as a result of an arrestee giving more incriminating evidence than was necessary to the police.  Questions that are appropriate to answer include but are not limited to the following:

  • What is your name?
  • Where are you going?
  • Do you have your driver’s license?
  • Do you have proof of insurance?
  • Do you know why I have stopped you? (simple yes or no)

Questions and request intended to incriminate you include:

  • Can I search your car?
  • Have you been drinking?
  • Do you have anything illegal in the car?

When You Need a Lawyer

The criminal justice system is a complex terrain that requires a knowledgeable and experienced Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer. Attorney Christopher M. Cosley is a respected and proven attorney. At The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley, you will receive dedicated and compassionate representation. Contact us at 847-394-3200, 24 hours a day, to schedule your consultation and get the representation you deserve.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs3.asp?ChapterID=49&ActID=1815

New Traffic Laws 2017

May 8th, 2017 at 10:09 am

traffic laws 2017, Rolling Meadows Criminal Defense LawyerThere are a number of changes to the traffic laws in Illinois—changes of which to be aware because, unfortunately, ignorance of the law is not a defense. The laws encompass areas including:

  • When you are required to switch lanes or reduce your speed;
  • The distance you have to come to a complete stop in front of a railroad crossing;
  • The kind of lights a motorcycle can display for their rear stop lamps; and
  • Penalties resulting from a conviction for driving without insurance.

The laws take effect this year in 2017, and some have already been implemented and applied. Traffic violations may seem minor; however, violations can carry hefty consequences for an unsuspecting motorist. Moreover, traffic violations can result in the loss or suspension of a license and increased insurance rates. Additionally, depending on the severity, traffic violations can even result in jail time.

Changing Lanes and Decreasing Speed

For a long time it has been a law that when an emergency vehicle approaches drivers with its lights on, drivers are required to changed lanes and pull over to allow the vehicle to pass. HB 6006 now demands that, whenever possible, drivers change lanes when approaching any disabled vehicle on the road with hazard lights flashing. Also, when it is not possible to change lanes, drivers must decrease their speed.

Distance You Have to Stop Before a Railroad Crossing

SB 2806 is a new law that changes the distance you have to stop before approaching a railroad crossing where there is a posted stop sign. As of January 2017, any motorist who fails to stop within 50 feet from the nearest rail will be guilty of a petty offense with a $500 fine, up from the $250 fine it used to be for a first offense. For a second offense the fine is $1000.

Changes to Traffic Laws Involving Motorcycles

HB 4105 now allows for motorcycles to be equipped with blue lights on the rear of the motorcycle in conjunction with the motorcycle’s rear stop lamp. The blue lights increase visibility from longer distances and thus increases motorcycle safety during night time operation.

Penalties for Driving Without Proof of Insurance

Any vehicle that you operate must be insured—being pulled over without proof of insurance can prove costly. However, HB 5723 aims to ease the burden for those unlucky enough to not have proof of insurance at the time they are stopped. It is now a petty offense for first time offenders who are pulled over and do not have proof of insurance. Again, this only applies to first time offenders.

How to Avoid a Traffic Violation

If you find yourself a defendant in a traffic violation matter, speak with the skilled Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney at The Law Office of Christopher M. Cosley. Call 847-394-3200 to schedule your consultation today.

Sources:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/BillStatus.asp?DocTypeID=HB&DocNum=6006&GAID=13&SessionID=88&LegID=95513

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/billstatus.asp?DocNum=2806&GAID=13&GA=99&DocTypeID=SB&LegID=96116&SessionID=88

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/BillStatus.asp?DocTypeID=HB&DocNum=4105&GAID=13&SessionID=88&LegID=90325

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/BillStatus.asp?DocTypeID=HB&DocNum=5723&GAID=13&SessionID=88&LegID=95177

 

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