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Archive for the ‘Criminal defense’ Category

Defending Against Sex Crime Charges in Illinois

September 18th, 2018 at 11:15 am

Cook County sex crime defense attorneyAll criminal charges need to be taken seriously. That being said, because of the penalties associated with sex crimes, those facing these charges are encouraged to seek professional representation immediately. Individuals who are charged with or convicted of a sexual offense, such as sexual assault or possession of child pornography, are likely to have a negative reputation that can follow them around forever. The stigma around alleged sex offenders is so powerful that it can be hard to shake this bad reputation, even if the defendant has been cleared of all charges. In the event a defendant is convicted of a sex crime, the consequences can be even worse. Sex crime convictions can carry a host of consequences, including significant jail time and being listed on the sex offender registry for the rest of your life. As such, you need an aggressive defense attorney who can protect your rights and your reputation.

Suppressing Evidence

Without evidence, there is generally no criminal case. Every crime and charge is different, but a criminal defense attorney will work tirelessly to suppress any evidence that is improperly collected against a defendant. Regardless of the crime or suspicion, everyone is entitled to their Constitutional rights. The Fourth Amendment to the Constitution gives individuals the right to be free from unreasonable searches and seizures. If the collection of evidence violated your rights, this could be a large factor in preventing criminal charges from being brought.

Improper Police Conduct

In addition to making sure that a police officer has the proper search warrants to collect evidence, the police have other conduct-related requirements that they must follow. For example, entrapment can often be a defense in sex crime cases. Entrapment is a complex area of the law, but your attorney may be able to show that if the police had not enticed you to commit a crime, you would not have committed the alleged offense.

Challenging Witness Testimony

Evidence in many cases comes from eyewitness testimony. However, not every witness is credible. Being able to poke holes in a witness’s story or credibility can discredit the witness enough to make their testimony unusable.

Another way to discredit a witness is by finding reasons that they might be lying about their memory or account of events. In some instances, people might be willing to lie to help out a family member or friend or because of a vendetta against the alleged offender. Exposing these lies is often key in defending against sex crime charges.

Contact a Cook County Sex Crime Defense Lawyer

Reputation is important. It follows you for the rest of your life, and it is hard to change other people’s perception of you. As such, criminal charges for sexual offenses can have a devastating impact on the rest of your life. You need an attorney who is willing to provide an aggressive defense and work hard to avoid the consequences of a conviction. Skilled Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney Christopher M. Cosley is here for you. Attorney Cosley is committed to providing the best defense possible under the circumstances. Contact us today at 847-394-3200 for a free consultation.

Sources:
http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs4.asp?docname=072000050hart%2E+11&actid=1876&chapterid=53&seqstart=14300000&seqend=20800000

Privacy Rights Upheld in Recent Supreme Court Case

September 14th, 2018 at 8:31 am

Chicago criminal defense lawyer unreasonable search and seizureIf you are facing a criminal charge, this does not mean that you are not entitled to the same rights and protections afforded to other individuals in the United States, including the right to privacy. The Fourth Amendment to the Constitution affords citizens the right to be free from unreasonable searches and seizures. Search warrants are used to ensure that if a search is being conducted, then there is a legitimate reason and cause for conducting the search. There are exceptions to this rule, however. Recently, the Supreme Court of the United States upheld the right to privacy for suspects regarding warrantless searches.

Collins v. Virginia

In the case of Collins v. Virginia, the defendant was suspected of being in possession of a motorcycle that had been stolen. The motorcycle was parked under a three-walled enclosure that was covered with a tarp. This enclosure was located at the defendant’s girlfriend’s house. The house also had a traditional garage that could completely block the inside of the garage from outside view. The police suspected that this motorcycle was parked at the defendant’s girlfriend’s home and therefore went to examine the scene. Instead of obtaining a search warrant, the police officers proceeded up the driveway to where the motorcycle was parked under the tarp. The motorcycle turned out to be the stolen property they were looking for, and the defendant was arrested.

At trial, the defendant argued that his fundamental right to privacy that is guaranteed by the Fourth Amendment was violated because the police did not have a valid search warrant for the property. The state argued that finding the motorcycle without a search warrant fell under the automobile exception. The automobile exception states that police are allowed to search a vehicle when there is probable cause that the vehicle contained some type of evidence or contraband.

The Court found that the automobile exception was not applicable in this case. Instead, the three-walled tarp enclosure could be considered a part of the home. As a part of the home, it receives the same type of heightened rights to privacy as the living area of the home. The Court went on further to state that the automobile exception applies only to situations where the alleged evidence or contraband is inside of a vehicle, not sitting underneath a tarp on someone else’s property.

An Attorney Can Help You Today

If you have been charged with a criminal offense and are concerned your rights have been violated, contact experienced Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney Christopher M. Cosley. Attorney Cosley is dedicated to using every possible defense applicable under the circumstances, including improper searches due to lack of a search warrant. We know that just because you might be charged with a crime, you should not lose your rights. Contact us today at 847-394-3200 for a free consultation.

Sources:
https://www.law.cornell.edu/wex/automobile_exception
https://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/17pdf/16-1027_7lio.pdf

The Timeline of a Criminal Charge in Illinois

September 11th, 2018 at 10:43 am

Cook County criminal defense attorneyFacing criminal charges can be a truly scary prospect. The process for how these charges are handled might seem tricky and confusing, but if you know the timeline and what to expect, it can ease your worries – at least a little. While every case is different and should be considered independently, there is a general framework of how the system works in Illinois. The following includes a general timeline of criminal charges in Illinois that you may encounter when facing the criminal justice system with the help of a skilled attorney:

The Offense and Arrest

A charge cannot be made unless a person is reasonably suspected of committing criminal activity. This suspicion may be determined through an extensive police investigation into an individual’s activities or through something as simple a traffic stop. However, the police must have probable cause in order to make an arrest. After being arrested, a suspect must be read their Miranda rights, informing them that they have the right to remain silent and contact an attorney.

Preliminary Hearing or Grand Jury

If the offense in question is a felony charge, a preliminary hearing or grand jury hearing will be used to formally charge the suspect. In these hearings, the prosecution must present a summary of the evidence against the defendant. The judge in a preliminary hearing or the jury in a grand jury hearing will decide whether there is enough evidence to charge the defendant with the crime.

Arraignment

At arraignment, a defendant is formally read the charges against them and given the option to plead “guilty” or “not guilty.” A defendant has the right to be represented by an attorney at the arraignment, and if necessary, the arraignment can be postponed while the defendant finds an attorney.

Trial Preparation and Trial

After arraignment, trial preparation begins. A defendant has the option to enter into a plea bargain and avoid a trial altogether. The defendant and their attorney will often enter into negotiations with the prosecution in an attempt to avoid trial. If no plea bargain is reached, then a trial will take place. Before trial, the defense attorney will contact witnesses, review documents or evidence obtained through discovery, and strategize the best options for success. At trial, both sides will present their case, and the judge or jury will decide on a verdict.

Verdict and Sentencing

The verdict will be read at the conclusion of the trial. If the defendant is found guilty, a separate sentencing hearing will be scheduled to determine the proper sentence. A sentencing hearing will also occur if a defendant decides to plead guilty at any time before a verdict is reached.

Appeal

A defendant has the right to appeal their case. To be successful, there must have been errors made during the trial, an unfair or improper sentence, or some other issue that greatly impacted the verdict and/or sentence.

Contact Us Today for Help

If you have been charged with a crime, an experienced attorney can help you navigate the legal process and determine your best options for defense. Skilled Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer Christopher M. Cosley can help you through all stages of a criminal charge. Contact us today at 847-394-3200 to arrange a free consultation.

Sources:
http://www.illinoiscourts.gov/SupremeCourt/Rules/Art_IV/ArtIV.htm#411
http://www.icjia.state.il.us/assets/pdf/ResearchReports/Policies_and_Procedures_of_the_Illinois_Criminal_Justice_System_Aug2012.pdf

Consequences of Resisting Arrest

September 6th, 2018 at 9:10 am

felony charges, Illinois criminal charges, misdemeanor charges, resisting arrest, Rolling Meadows defense attorneyNo one expects, or wants, to be arrested on any given day. There are many stories in the news these days about people resisting arrest and are injured in the process. Even though getting arrested is an inconvenience, it is important to not resist a police officer making an arrest. Resisting arrest in Illinois can result in additional criminal charges.

Resisting Arrest in Illinois

Under Illinois statute, the official title for resisting arrest is “Resisting or Obstructing a Peace Officer, Firefighter, or Correctional Institution Employee.” This title brings about a broad category of people to whom the statute applies. Police officers, peace officers, firefighters, and correctional officers are all considered protected workers under the statute.

Additionally, it is not just resisting an actual arrest that can result in a charge under the statute. In addition to resisting arrest, other acts can result in a charge and include:

  • Hitting a protected worker during the arrest;
  • Not consenting to being arrested;
  • Being hesitant to respond to the arrest or moving too slowly or reluctantly;
  • Acting in a way that results in an officer having to drag you or carry you during the arrest;
  • Running away from an officer while being arrested; and
  • Pulling away from an officer while being arrested.

The statute does not just cover situations where a person “resists” arrest in some way or another. One can also be charged if he or she obstructs the protected worker while doing his or her duties.

Examples of ways one can obstruct a protected worker who is doing his or her job include:

  • Not leaving the scene of a crime after being instructed to do so;
  • Causing an interference in a police investigation;
  • Preventing a protected worker from doing his or her job, like preventing a firefighter from being able to put out a fire;
  • Relaying false information to the police; and
  • Using fake identification when talking to the police.

The charge of resisting arrests can result in a misdemeanor charge. A conviction carries a penalty of at least spending 48 hours in jail or completing 100 hours of community service. There is also the possibility of fines. Resisting arrest can result in a felony charge if an injury is caused to the protected worker while resisting or obstructing.

Contact Us Today for Help

While resisting arrest might not seem like a big issue, it is and should be taken seriously. Criminal charges are serious and should be treated as such. Dedicated Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney Christopher M. Cosley is here to defend you no matter how seemingly small the charge. Do not let charges accumulate on your criminal record. Contact us today to get your defense started.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=072000050K31-1

The Impact of a Criminal Conviction

August 13th, 2018 at 4:42 pm

criminal background checks, criminal conviction, employment and criminal conviction, Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer, criminal historyWhen watching television cop shows, it seems like everyone in the world has been convicted or charged with some type of crime, even if by accident or mistake. These television shows attempt to take you through the criminal process of being charged with a crime and the sentence that can be imposed should you be found guilty. While there is a large amount of coverage dedicated to the crime itself and the sentence, there is not often any discussion on what the impact of a criminal charge can be on one’s life. The impact of a criminal conviction is far reaching and impacts more areas of life than one might think.

Employment

Many people who have ever filled out a job application know that one of the questions asked during the hiring process is whether or not an individual has been convicted of a crime. While there are laws in place to protect some ex-criminals from being discriminated against, there are plenty of employment opportunities lost because of a criminal conviction. There are certain jobs that require an applicant to have a background that does not contain a criminal conviction. If you have been convicted of a crime, do not lie about it. Many employers will run a criminal background check on prospective employees to make sure that they did not lie about their history and ensure they are a good fit for the company.

Housing

In addition to affecting your ability to get a job, housing can be a problem for convicted individuals. Some apartment complexes and homeowner’s associations will not allow a property to be rented or bought by someone with a criminal record. A lot of this has to do with the bias that is against those with a criminal record.

Reputation

Being convicted of a crime can change the public opinion about someone. Once an individual has been villainized in the media, it is often hard to erase that image in people’s minds. It takes years and hard work to build a great reputation, but only moments to destroy it. Those with criminal convictions might find it hard to engage in the same social activities that they did before the conviction because people are wary and have a bias.

Reach Out to Us Today for Help

If you have been charged with a crime, do not just ignore it. You need a dedicated defense attorney who is ready to advocate for your case. The dedicated Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney at The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley is available to help you avoid a life-altering criminal conviction. We use every defense and piece of evidence to give you the best defense and outcome possible given the circumstances. Contact us today for a consultation.

Source:

http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/ct-illinois-laws-criminal-records-118-biz-20170117-story.html

Accessing Police Records in Cook County

August 10th, 2018 at 7:16 am

police records, Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney, criminal records, Illinois criminal system, current criminal chargesThere are a number of reasons why a person might want access to his or her police records. He or she may want to make sure any criminal charges are accurately depicted, or he or she may want to make sure that a certain charge or conviction is no longer listed on his or her record. Whatever the reason, in Cook County a person has the ability to access his or her police reports.

The Uniform Conviction Information Act passed in 1991 requires that a person’s criminal record and conviction information must be made public. This act was passed in an attempt at full transparency and to give those that needed this information the avenue and opportunity to seek the information that they required. An individual’s criminal record will contain arrests, convictions, and other data about contact that the person has had with the Illinois criminal system.

Reasons to Access a Criminal Record

As mentioned above, there are several reasons why a person would want or need to access his or her criminal record. The following are the more common reasons:

  • Expungement – If a person is trying to have something on his or her criminal record expunged, then he or she will likely need to look at the record to see exactly what crime should be expunged and the way in which is it presented on record. Not every crime can be expunged, so a person must examine his or her record thoroughly to determine how to go about receiving an expungement.
  • Pending Litigation – For a defendant who is facing charges, obtaining a copy of his or her criminal record could be helpful in building a defense to the current charges.
  • Checking for Accuracies – A person might want to check his or her record just to make sure that his or her criminal history is correct. Potential employers or landlords often run criminal background checks on prospective employees or renters. Therefore, it is important to know what exactly it is he or she will be seeing upon request of the record.

Who Can Receive the Record?

It is not just an individual who has permission to obtain his or her own record. There are many parties who might have an interest and include the following:

  • Victim – The victim of a crime has the right to view and obtain a copy of a person’s criminal record. Usually, a victim is presented with copies of the report after the charge is filed.
  • Defendant – The person of whom the record is for can request a copy of his or her own record.
  • Third Parties – Employers, landlords, or members of the community are able to obtain a copy of public record. The Freedom of Information Act gives anyone the right to view or obtain copies of documents that are a matter of public record.

We Can Help You Today

If you have questions about your criminal record, contact a dedicated Rolling Meadows defense attorney at The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley. We can answer any questions you might have and inform you of any options you have regarding you record.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs3.asp?ActID=351&ChapterID=5

Illinois Retail Theft Ring Broken Up

July 13th, 2018 at 7:20 am

Illinois theft charges, retail theft ring, Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney, theft crimes, retail theft chargesretail theft ring made up of six individuals has been broken up and resulted in charges being filed for all six individuals involved, according to The Times. Thousands of dollars worth of merchandise was stolen by six people throughout Illinois and Northwest Indiana. Both Illinois and Indiana police departments were investigating a string of retail theft instances. The suspects were found after detectives identified the individuals on surveillance tapes.

Additionally, detectives were able to use an informant to gain more information about the six suspects. The theft ring was targeting more high-end items, like electronics and handbags. Two of the suspects are in custody, with warrants out for the other four individuals. The investigation is ongoing as the detectives on the case are looking for additional evidence or thefts committed by the ring.

Retail Theft in Illinois

Retail theft, or shoplifting, is a serious problem throughout Illinois. As such, there are harsh penalties that can be imposed on individuals who are caught stealing from retail stores. An Illinois statute defines retail theft and the various ways in which one might commit retail theft. Retail theft is committed anytime a person knowingly takes possession of merchandise at a store that is offered for sale in a retail establishment. The person must have the intent to permanently deprive the merchant of the item or the benefits of the item.

There are various ways in which retail theft can be committed and include:

  • Taking items from a store without paying – This is one of the most common types of retail theft. This is what people most commonly think of when they think of retail theft;
  • Changing a price tag – It can also be retail theft if an individual alters a price tag on an item in an attempt to purchase it with the new price. Most often, people will try to change the tag to a lower-priced item;
  • Unwarranted discounts – Employees at retail stores can also be guilty of retail theft. Failure to ring up all items at the cash register, or to apply unlawful discounts, is also considered retail theft.
  • Use of a jamming device – In many stores, anti-theft tags are attached to items to alert the store if a person attempts to remove the item without paying. The use of a jamming device so that the merchandise can go through security without sounding the alarm is retail theft.

Contact an Aggressive Theft Defense Attorney for Help

If you have been charged with retail theft, you need an attorney who knows the law well. Skilled Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney Christopher M. Cosley is ready and waiting to defend you. Attorney Cosley uses every applicable defense to get you the best result possible given the circumstances. With the vast amount of theft crimes, you need an attorney who understands the differences in crimes and can adequately represent you. Contact us today to find out how we can help you.

Sources:

https://www.nwitimes.com/news/local/lake/police-bust-retail-theft-ring-operating-in-nwi-and-illinois/article_e7903fd2-37df-5e92-99e1-4dcfe803c553.html

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=072000050K16-25

The Use of Circumstantial Evidence in Illinois Criminal Cases

July 6th, 2018 at 4:06 pm

circumstantial evidence, criminal defense cases, Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney, criminal proceedings, contradictory evidenceIf you turn on any crime drama show, chances are you have heard a prosecutor or defense attorney utter the phrase, “you only have circumstantial evidence.” As a viewer of a television program, you might just hear these words and not think about what circumstantial evidence is or the role it plays in criminal defense cases. Circumstantial evidence is not just a phrase you hear television lawyers throw around, however, but a real type of evidence that is at issue in criminal proceedings.

Direct vs. Circumstantial Evidence

There are two types of evidence that can be used in criminal trials. Direct evidence is actual physical evidence used to link a defendant directly to a crime. This could be a video surveillance tape, a fingerprint at the crime scene, or any other evidence that directly points to a defendant committing a crime.

According to Illinois jury instructions, circumstantial evidence is “the proof of facts or circumstances which give rise to a reasonable inference of other facts which tend to show the guilt or innocence of a defendant.” Essentially, this is evidence that is not actually rooted in hard, physical proof, but instead includes the circumstances that surround a defendant and point to their innocence or guilt. Further, Illinois instructs juries to use circumstantial evidence combined with other evidence presented in the case to arrive at a verdict.

Circumstantial evidence is used so that inferences can be made to link a defendant to a crime. Common examples can include resisting arrest, a motive to commit the crime, the opportunity to commit the crime, evasions by the defendant, denials, inconsistencies, the presence of a defendant at the scene of the crime, and any other conduct of the defendant that could be used to draw inferences to a defendant’s guilt.

Prior Illinois Law

In the past, Illinois made special considerations around the use of circumstantial evidence. Previously, circumstantial evidence was only allowed to be used exclusively for a conviction of a defendant if the evidence excluded every reasonable possibility that the defendant might be innocent.

Now, circumstantial evidence can be used in addition to direct evidence. All evidence is considered by the trier of fact (the jury) or a judge in the event it is not a jury trial. This evidence can all be used to determine whether the prosecution has proved beyond a reasonable doubt that a defendant is guilty of the crime of which they are charged.

Let Us Help You Today

If you have been charged with a criminal charge, then you need an attorney. Passionate Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney Christopher M. Cosley will work diligently to present every piece of evidence available to prove your innocence. Attorney Cosley understands that circumstantial evidence can play a huge part in a criminal trial and will present contradictory evidence at every available opportunity.

Source:

http://www.illinoiscourts.gov/circuitcourt/CriminalJuryInstructions/CRIM_03.00.pdf

Three Common Misconceptions About Criminal Law in Illinois

June 4th, 2018 at 9:13 am

criminal law in Illinois, Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorneys, first-time offenders, criminal sentencing guidelines, criminal case evidenceFor many people, their knowledge of the criminal justice system comes from television shows or other types of media. As such, they may get ideas in their heads of what should happen in criminal cases. In reality, many events that take place on television are not accurate depictions of actual criminal defense cases in Illinois.

Real life cases do not follow a script, and they can be unpredictable and shocking. It is important to know which facts are the truth and which are mere misconceptions. In light of this, consider the following three common misconceptions about the criminal justice system.

Any Time I Am Not Read My Miranda Rights, My Case Will Be Dismissed

A defendant must be read his or her rights anytime he or she is in custody of the police and is being interrogated. Being ‘in custody’ is a complicated issue. Merely talking to the police does not always mean that you are in custody, and neither does being placed in handcuffs.

There are several factors that go into determining when a defendant is in custody. If a defendant’s rights are not read, and he or she is in fact in custody, this does not mean the case will automatically be dismissed. Generally, any statement made during the custodial interrogation will be suppressed and unusable in trial. However, there is no requirement that a case must be dismissed.

If I Ask an Undercover Police Officer if He is a Police Officer, He Has to Tell Me

There is no requirement for a police officer, who is working undercover for whatever reason, to disclose that he or she is a police officer. Undercover operations are used in a variety of situations, and the disclosure of such would make an operation useless.

I Will Not Go to Jail for My First Offense; I Have a Family and a Job

There are sentencing guidelines for crimes committed in Illinois. The severity of the crime determines what the sentence will be. Just because someone has been charged with his or her first ever criminal act, it does not mean he or she could not go to jail. Judges have likely seen a lot of defendants go through their courtroom, including many first-time offenders and those with families. A judge will follow the sentencing guidelines and will not fall prey to emotional pleadings for no jail time in certain crimes.

We Can Help You Today

At the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley, we make sure to provide you with accurate legal information so you are aware of what is happening in your case. Our talented Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney has the skill and knowledge to defend you in an array of criminal matters. Contact us today to get the best defense available.

Sources:

https://repository.law.umich.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?referer=https://www.google.com/&httpsredir=1&article=1028&context=book_chapters

http://www.ilga.gov/commission/lru/2005pfc.pdf

Reckless Driving in Illinois

May 18th, 2018 at 10:00 am

reckless driving, traffic offenses, reckless driving charges, speeding, Class A misdemeanorWhile many believe reckless driving to be a minor offense, in reality it can lead to serious consequences that have lasting effects. As such, if you have been charged with reckless driving in Illinois, we ask you to reach out to us today for professional help.

What is Reckless Driving?

In Illinois, reckless driving is governed by statute 625 ILCS 5/11-305. There are two situations in which a person can be found guilty of reckless driving:

  1. A person who drives “with willful or wanton disregard for the safety of persons or property” is said to be driving recklessly; and
  2. A person who knowingly drives “a vehicle and uses an incline in a roadway, such as a railroad crossing, bridge approach, or hill, to cause the vehicle to become airborne” is driving recklessly.

Common examples of reckless driving include a person who is driving at a high rate of speed, someone who is driving erratically, or any other type of driving that might rise to the level of negligent driving. Driving erratically includes drivers who swerve in and out of lanes without notice and without the use of their turn signals.

Penalties in Illinois

If you are found to be driving recklessly in Illinois, the penalties are much higher than with a minor speeding ticket or traffic violation. Reckless driving is considered a Class A misdemeanor. A Class A misdemeanor carries up to 364 days in county jail and the potential for a fine up to $2,500. Additionally, a charge of reckless driving on your driving record also means points added to your license.

If you do not want to have a reckless driving charge on your driving record, there is the potential for an alternative penalty. Instead of the charge being added to the record, a driver can be placed under supervision. Supervision usually requires the payment of a fine, attendance and completion of Traffic Safety School, or both. However, once you use the supervision for the reckless driving charge, you can no longer be eligible for supervision for any additional reckless driving charges, or for a first DUI charge.

Additional Consequences to Reckless Driving

Upon conviction, you will receive fines, court costs, jail time, or possible supervision. There are other consequences to consider in a reckless driving charge, or any traffic-related offense:

  • License Suspension: The Illinois Point System has a three-strike rule. This means that if you receive three moving violations within a 12-month period, you may have your license suspended, although this may depend on your individual circumstances.
  • Increased Insurance Rates: With the addition of points on your license, your insurance premiums will likely go up.

We Can Help You Today

If you have been charged with reckless driving and want to hear about the options available to you, contact the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley. A dedicated Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney at our office is equipped with the knowledge and skill to explain your options and get the best results possible.

Sources:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=062500050K11-503

http://www.cookcountycourt.org/ABOUTTHECOURT/MunicipalDepartment/FirstMunicipalDistrictChicago/TrafficSection/CourtSupervision.aspx

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