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Archive for the ‘Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer’ tag

The Three Types of Protective Orders Available in Illinois

July 17th, 2017 at 12:13 pm

protective orders, Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer, Illinois criminal defense, Illinois protective order, protective order violationIn Illinois, there are three different types of protective orders (also referred to as restraining orders); emergency protective orders, interim protective orders, and plenary protective orders. If a protective order has been filed against you it is important that you understand which type of order you are facing so that you can take the necessary steps to protect your legal rights. Read on to learn about the three types of protective orders available in Illinois and then contact a local order of protection criminal defense lawyer to discuss your legal options.

Emergency Protective Orders

An emergency protective order offers short-term protection to the accuser and can be issued solely based on his or her testimony. Furthermore, under some circumstances an emergency protective order can be issued ex parte, i.e. against you without prior notice. Emergency protective orders are temporary in nature and are designed to be in effect until a full hearing for a more long-term protective order can be held (this usually takes place within 14-21 days).

Interim Protective Orders

In some cases it takes awhile before a full restraining order hearing can be held. When this happens, the court may issue an interim protective order to be in effect from the date on which the accuser’s emergency protective order expires until the full court hearing takes place. Interim protective orders can be in effect for up to 30 days. However, an interim protective order can only be issued against you in Illinois if you have had a chance to make an initial appearance in court and have been properly notified of the date on which your full restraining order hearing will take place.

Plenary Protective Orders

Plenary protective orders are unique because unlike the other types of protective orders that are available in Illinois plenary orders offer long-term protection. Plenary protective orders may last up to two years and, under 750 ILCS 60/220(e), may be renewed an unlimited number of times. However, a court will not issue a plenary protective order until after holding a hearing in which both the accuser and the accused have had a chance to present their cases.

A Protective Order Has Been Filed Against Me, What Should I Do Now?

The circumstances surrounding each protective order are different, so the best thing that you can do is consult with a local criminal defense attorney about the specifics of your case. However, it is generally also advisable to avoid all contact with your accuser (this includes calling or texting them!), attend every hearing that has been scheduled, and fully comply with every provision of the order against you.

Reach Out to Us for Assistance

If you need help opposing an Illinois protective order, or defending yourself against an alleged protective order violation, the experienced Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyers of The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley are here to help. Our firm is located in Rolling Meadows but we are dedicated to defending adults and juveniles throughout the greater Chicago area.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=075000600K220

Criminal Cases: Who Needs Science for Scientific Evidence?

June 21st, 2017 at 12:18 pm

criminal cases, criminal trials, forensic testing, Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer, scientific evidenceAttorney General Jeff Sessions recently announced that the National Commission on Forensic Science is to be dissolved. The National Commission on Forensic Science is a non-political commission whose mandate is to oversee and advance the reliability and preciseness of scientific evidence used in criminal cases.

The commission is made up of a mixed group of people who are trained to monitor and audit the uses of scientific evidence. Various agencies including federal, state, and local forensic service providers work together to strengthen the reliability of forensic science as a whole and particularly how it is used in criminal cases.

Forensic evidence explains a type of evidence that can come in many forms. Forensic evidence can be:

  • Dental records;
  • Fingerprints;
  • Genetic material;
  • Trace chemicals;
  • Shoe imprints;
  • Bodily fluids; or
  • Skin cells.

Forensic evidence can be defined as evidence that was gained through scientific methodology like ballistics testing, blood analysis, or DNA testing. It is evidence used to link crimes together or to build a narrative about what the prosecution thinks happened in a particular case.

The Attorney General is poised to lay the responsibility of forensic testing squarely on the shoulders of the police and prosecutors office. However, unbridled scientific evidence that is used at criminal trials by prosecutors is extremely problematic in that it can lead directly to the conviction of innocent people.

When the authenticity of scientific results is maintained by the side of the criminal justice system that seeks to use it, the potential for misuse or corruption is ever present.

In 2015, the United States Department of Justice, in conjunction with the FBI, found that nearly every examiner in the FBI’s microscopic hair unit “gave misleading, exaggerated, or otherwise flawed testimony in criminal cases between 1972 and 1999.” Hence, the criminal justice system has been speculating results, not providing reliable results, with regard to evidence used to send people to jail.

Do Not Fear Forensic Evidence

Many criminal trials turn on forensic evidence. It is evidence prosecutors rely on, evidence juries like to hear, and evidence intended to be inherently reliable. If you are the defendant in a criminal trial and the state has forensic evidence they intend to use against you, a skilled and experienced Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer can defend your rights and challenge the evidence against you. Contact our Rolling meadows office at 847-394-3200 to schedule your initial consultation. The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley is prepared 24 hours a day to serve our clients in need of criminal defense.

Sources:

http://www.newsweek.com/sessionss-assault-forensic-science-will-lead-more-unsafe-convictions-585762

https://www.justice.gov/archives/ncfs

Illinois Innocence Project

June 7th, 2017 at 7:00 am

Illinois Innocence Project, Rolling Meadows, exoneree, criminal justice system, criminal charges, Illinois crimeYou were innocent. You knew it all along and now you have your freedom. But what happens next?

There is a group operating out of Springfield, Illinois called the Illinois Innocence Project. They have been working since early 2001 to overturn wrongful criminal convictions in Illinois. At the start, their primary focus was exonerating inmates through legal avenues, and the group has had much success.

The most recent example of their success was the release of one man, Charles Palmer, who was set free the day before thanksgiving in 2016, after he had been forced to spend 18 years of his life behind bars for a crime he did not commit.

A surprising yet inevitable new issue to address arose when the Illinois Innocence Project noticed that many times the people who were exonerated lacked educational, emotional, or familial support once they were released. 

Governor Bruce Rauner has advocated for a 25 percent reduction in the Illinois prison population within the next 10 years. The time frame in which the inmates reenter society is important because they have an opportunity to prepare themselves for release, get their affairs in order, and otherwise have a more temperate and gradual reintroduction to society.

Not every inmate released has that opportunity. Take for example, Charles Palmer, who had roughly two weeks’ notice that there was a possibility for his release, and did not find out until the day before his release that his freedom was probable. This presents a massive challenge to an exoneree who otherwise had no reason to anticipate his or her release. According to John Hanlon, the executive and legal director for IIP, “the average exoneree does not have any money, a job, or even any place to go. It’s a tremendous challenge.”

What to Do If You Are Charged with a Crime You Did Not Commit

If you are arrested or charged with a crime, then the very first step you should take is to contact a lawyer. Your lawyer will offer you advice on questions you should or should not answer. Immediately contacting a lawyer also gives your attorney time to note any important details surrounding your case—information which may help give you the best opportunity to fight the crimes for which you have been charged. 

The criminal justice system is a massive machine with numerous moving parts all moving against you. This is not the time to try and stand on your own two feet. You need an experienced and fearless Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney to stand up with you and defend your rights. If you or a loved one has been charged with a crime, contact The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley at 847-394-3200. 

Source:

http://illinoistimes.com/article-18578-you%25E2%2580%2599re-a-free-man_-now-what.html

Traffic Citations and Your Driving Record in Illinois

May 24th, 2017 at 7:13 am

traffic citations, Rolling MeadowsStandard moving violations will usually stay on your driving record for up to five years from the time you are convicted, according to the Illinois Secretary of state. Standard moving violations include:

  • Speeding;
  • Disobeying a stop sign;
  • Disobeying a traffic light; and
  • Improper lane usage.

However, traffic violations whose penalties result in a suspension or revocation can stay on your driving record for at least seven years. That timeline will not start until the date you get your license reinstated.  The caveat to that general rule are traffic violations that include alcohol or drugs, like a DUI for example. Those kinds of convictions may stay on your Illinois driving record for the rest of your life.

Is There Any Way I Can Keep a Traffic Ticket Off My Driving Record?

That is a question for your Cook County traffic violation attorney. Generally, the only way to accomplish that is to receive court supervision as a punishment for your traffic violation or getting the charge dropped or dismissed.

Traffic violation convictions not only cause your insurance rates to increase but they also count as points towards getting your license suspended. When faced with a traffic violation, it is important that you speak with an experienced and knowledgeable traffic violation defense lawyer to give you the best shot at keeping traffic infractions off of your record.

Understand Your Rights

It is important that you understand what rights you have at a traffic stop. When a police officer stops you and begins asking questions, it is usually not polite conversation. He or she is beginning their investigation into whether or not you have committed a moving violation or a more serious offense.

The majority of convictions in Illinois occur as a result of an arrestee giving more incriminating evidence than was necessary to the police.  Questions that are appropriate to answer include but are not limited to the following:

  • What is your name?
  • Where are you going?
  • Do you have your driver’s license?
  • Do you have proof of insurance?
  • Do you know why I have stopped you? (simple yes or no)

Questions and request intended to incriminate you include:

  • Can I search your car?
  • Have you been drinking?
  • Do you have anything illegal in the car?

When You Need a Lawyer

The criminal justice system is a complex terrain that requires a knowledgeable and experienced Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer. Attorney Christopher M. Cosley is a respected and proven attorney. At The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley, you will receive dedicated and compassionate representation. Contact us at 847-394-3200, 24 hours a day, to schedule your consultation and get the representation you deserve.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs3.asp?ChapterID=49&ActID=1815

When is Trespassing a Crime?

May 15th, 2017 at 9:04 am

trespassing, Rolling Meadows Criminal Defense LawyerAs a youth , sneaking into a movie theater or a pool after hours may seem like good fun; however, making a choice such as this can turn into a criminal trespassing arrest or conviction.

Illinois law sets out what kind of activity is considered criminally liable trespassing. Those elements include but are not limited to the following:

  • A person knowingly, without lawful authority, enters or remains within or on a building;
  • A person enters land owned by another, and the owner gave notice that entry was forbidden;
  • A person remains upon the land of another after receiving notice that entry was forbidden;
  • A person falsely gains access to premises for which general public entry is forbidden; and
  • A person intentionally removes notice that entry is forbidden.

What Are the Penalties for Criminal Trespassing?

This is a question for your Rolling Meadows, Cook County criminal trespassing defense attorney. The penalties will vary depending on the circumstances of each crime. Generally, criminal trespassing in Illinois is a misdemeanor. Therefore, a conviction will likely encompass a fine; however, it can also land you in jail for up to a year. There are different categories of criminal trespassing, and include:

  • Criminal trespass to vehicles;
  • Criminal trespass to real property;
  • Criminal trespass to state supported land;
  • Criminal trespass to restricted areas;
  • Criminal trespass to a nuclear facility; and
  • Criminal trespass to a place of public amusement.

Each variation of trespassing can give you a varying penalty, or be used in conjunction with another crime which can also affect the sentence handed down. It is important that you speak with a knowledgeable Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney about the potential repercussions you may face as well as map out a strategy for your defense.

What Defenses Are Available?

The type of trespassing you are charged with will drive the defenses that you have available to you. For example, a common defense to the trespass of land is arguing that there was not sufficient notice to forbid entrance. It may also be argued that the land you were trespassing on was open to the public and therefore you did not break the law by being present on it. Ignorance of the law or mistake of fact are typically not defenses to trespass.

Been Arrested for Trespassing?

If you or a loved one has been charged with a trespassing crime, then it is crucial that you get the dedicated and insightful representation you deserve. Attorney Christopher M. Cosley has nearly two decades of standing up for his clients rights and providing criminal defense every step of the way for his clients. Contact our skilled Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer at 847-394-3200, 24 hours a day, to schedule your consultation. Do not face these charges alone.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=072000050K21-3

Is it Burglary, Theft, or Robbery?

May 10th, 2017 at 8:54 am

burglary, theft, robbery, Rolling Meadows Criminal Defense LawyerBurglary, theft, and robbery are serious crimes, and each one has distinctive characteristics. Illinois law is very specific in how it defines these crimes and it takes a knowledgeable Rolling Meadows defense lawyer to explain how the laws differ and what the difference means moving forward in your case.

  • Burglary is defined by Illinois law as entering the property of another, knowingly, and without permission, and with the intent to commit a theft or a felony once inside the property.  It is a common misconception that the property needs to be a home. Boats, cars, railroad cars, even airplanes can be burglarized.
  • Theft, as defined by Illinois law, is the unlawful or unauthorized taking of property from another person with the intent to permanently deprive that person of the property.
  • Robbery is the most serious of these three offenses and generally carries the most severe punishments. The reason for that is the violent nature of the offense. Robbery is basically theft accomplished through the use of force, or the fear of force.

Can a Theft Turn into a Robbery?

This is a question you will want to ask your experienced cook county criminal defense lawyer. Generally, the short answer is yes. Theft can turn into robbery the moment the victim is physically harmed or is put in fear of harm. A common example is a purse snatching incident. If a woman sets her purse down on a table and someone whisks by and takes it, a theft has occurred. However, if that person snatches the purse off of the same woman’s arm, it is likely to be charged as a robbery.

Does a Theft Have to Occur for a Burglary Charge?

The short answer is no. A burglary can occur without the actual theft of property. While most burglaries that are committed involve a theft of some sort, it does not have to happen in order for burglary to have happened in the eyes of the law. For example, if someone breaks into his or her neighbor’s home, sneaks in the kitchen, and makes pot brownies, among other crimes they have also committed a burglary.

Facing Criminal Charges?

If you have been arrested and charged with a crime, the first step you should take is to contact your experienced Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer. Attorney Christopher M. Cosley has years of experience defending his clients rights when they have been charged with crimes. The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley is equipped with the resources necessary to minimize the damage of any criminal conviction and ensure that your rights guaranteed by the constitution are honored by the prosecution. Contact our Rolling Meadows office at 847-394-3200, 24 hours a day, to speak with our dedicated and relentless criminal defense lawyer.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs4.asp?ActID=1876&ChapterID=53&SeqStart=62600000&SeqEnd=63400000

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=072000050K16-1

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs4.asp?ActID=1876&ChapterID=53&SeqStart=61900000&SeqEnd=62600000

Accused of Burglarizing a Store? Get a Criminal Defense Lawyer

May 3rd, 2017 at 8:10 am

burglarizing a store, Rolling Meadows Criminal Defense LawyerBurglary in Illinois involves someone knowingly entering a building without permission, and with the intent to commit a theft or a felony. One of the most common targets for acts of burglary are stores and shops.

From large retailers to small mom-and-pop type stores, virtually any type of store can be the target of a burglary or an attempted burglary. The main reason why a person commits a burglary of a store is usually to steal some piece of merchandise or to steal money. But what is interesting about the crime of burglary is that a burglar does not actually have to steal anything in order to commit the crime. Simply breaking into the store with the intent to steal something is enough to warrant a conviction for burglary.

Burglary is a Different Charge Than Theft or Shoplifting

Burglary is often charged when a person breaks into a store with the intent to steal something when the store is normally closed. Burglary could also be charged if a person remains in an open store after being asked to leave, or remains in a store in an off-limits area—in either case while having the intent to steal or commit a felony. Still, burglary is a different offense than theft or shoplifting.  

As a general rule, someone who is charged with burglary is not also charged with shoplifting, even if the person steals something during the burglary. Rather, he or she may be charged with burglary and theft, but each situation is unique and the exact charges will depend on the circumstances of the offense.

Shoplifting, on the other hand, is charged when someone steals merchandise from a store, alters the price of the item, or attempts to buy an item for less than its ticket price due to some sort of trickery (e.g., price tag swapping, or trying to trick the self-checkout scanner at the store). Shoplifting is usually associated with theft that occurs during normal business hours of the store’s operation.

Why You Need to Fight Your Criminal Charges

Whether you are facing burglary, theft, of shoplifting charges, it is important that you fight your criminal charges. If you are convicted of burglary, it is a Class 2 felony. If you are convicted of theft, it can be either a misdemeanor or a felony level offense. Similarly, depending on the circumstances surrounding the shoplifting, you could be convicted of a misdemeanor or a felony level offense.

A conviction will leave you with a criminal record, which can follow you around for many years, making it difficult to get some forms of employment or to rent an apartment. Hiring a criminal defense lawyer to fight for you will give you your best chance of defending yourself against the charges.

If you did commit the crime, then it is important to try and get the charges reduced, or dropped, and you will want to have a lawyer on your side to make sure that you receive fair treatment under the law.

Contact an Experienced Criminal Defense Lawyer

Burglary, theft, and shoplifting charges are nothing to be taken lightly. You need the help of an experienced and talented criminal defense lawyer with years of experience to fight the charges that are pending against you. Contact a passionate Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney at our office for assistance with your case.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs4.asp?ActID=1876&ChapterID=53&SeqStart=62600000&SeqEnd=63400000

Burglary of a Vehicle: Is it Considered a Break in if the Car Was Unlocked?

May 1st, 2017 at 8:20 am

burglary of a vehicle, Rolling Meadows Criminal Defense LawyerIt is not unheard of for people to get arrested for breaking into unlocked vehicles in Illinois. In these situations, the individual involved can be charged with a number of different criminal offenses based on the circumstances surrounding their activities.

Anyone who has been arrested and charged with a crime for entering an unlocked vehicle without the owner’s permission needs to consult with an experienced criminal defense lawyer immediately. Your rights are in jeopardy and you need to take steps promptly to protect yourself.

Burglary of a Vehicle

One of the crimes that people who enter an unlocked vehicle without the owner’s permission often face is burglary of a vehicle. When a person knowingly enters a vehicle that he or she does not have permission to enter, and the perpetrator does so with the intent to commit a felony or a theft, it can constitute the offense of burglary of a vehicle. Many times, a vehicle is broken into in order to steal something valuable inside. Sunglasses, music players, cell phones, cash, and airbags are all common items that are stolen from unlocked vehicles. Burglary of a vehicle is a felony.

Regardless of the fact that the vehicle may have been unlocked, if you entered the vehicle without the owner’s permission and removed something from the vehicle with no intention of giving the removed item back to its rightful owner, you will likely face criminal charges of burglary of a vehicle.

  • You could have viable defenses that you could bring up at trial. For instance, perhaps you had permission or believed you had permission from the owner of the vehicle to enter the unlocked vehicle.
  • Perhaps you accidentally opened the vehicle and got inside because it was the same make and model as your own vehicle and you were mistaken that the vehicle was in fact not your own.
  • Maybe you had no intention to commit a felony or to steal anything when you entered the unlocked vehicle belonging to someone else.

You should discuss the facts of your particular situation with your lawyer to determine what defenses you may have available to you.

Criminal Trespass to a Motor Vehicle

You could also be charged with criminal trespass to a motor vehicle. Criminal trespass of a motor vehicle occurs when someone knowingly enters or operates a vehicle belonging to another without permission. It is a misdemeanor offense.

It is not uncommon for criminal defendants to adopt a defense strategy of getting their charges dismissed or reduced to a lesser offense. For someone who is charged with burglary of a motor vehicle, it might be a good strategy to try and get the charges reduced to criminal trespass to a motor vehicle instead. Your specific circumstances should be discussed with your criminal defense lawyer.

Contact an Experienced Criminal Defense Lawyer

You could be charged with a crime if you enter a vehicle without the owner’s permission, even if the vehicle was left unlocked. If you are facing criminal charges for breaking into an unlocked vehicle, you need to consult with an experienced Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer today.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=072000050K21-2

Illinois State Police Strictly Enforce FATAL-4 Moving Violations

April 10th, 2017 at 7:00 am

moving violations, Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorneyThe Illinois state police are motivated to help reduce instances of automobile accidents and traffic fatalities in and around Rolling Meadows, Illinois. That is why state law enforcement focuses on four moving violations known as the “FATAL-4”, which are four moving violations that pose the highest rate of causing traffic fatalities.

Law enforcement looks particularly closely for signs that drivers are committing any of the FATAL-4 driving offenses. The traffic offenses that make up the FATAL-4 include:

  1. Driving under the influence of drugs and/or alcohol. Under 625 ILCS 5/11-501, it is illegal to drive a motor vehicle while under the influence of drugs and/or alcohol in Illinois. A person is considered to be too drunk to drive when he or she has a blood alcohol concentration of 0.08 percent or if his or her ability to safely operate the vehicle is compromised. Driving while under the influence impacts a driver’s ability to judge distance and speed and can render a driver incapable of operating his or her vehicle safely.
  2. Speeding. Driving faster than the posted speed limit or faster than road conditions or weather conditions allow is illegal in Illinois under 625 ILCS 5/11-601. Drivers have a duty to reduce speed when approaching crossings, intersections, going around curves, approaching a crest in the road, approaching hazards, when pedestrians are visible, or whenever traffic conditions indicate a need to slow down. Speeding by a certain degree above the posted speed limit can carry certain penalties proportionate to the offense. For instance, there is a specific statute concerning speeding when the driver is going more than 26 miles per hour over the posted speed limit.
  3. Engaging in distracted driving. Whether it is texting while driving, tuning the radio, or fiddling with center console controls for the heating or air conditioning in the vehicle, when a driver is not paying full attention to the task of driving, the driver is distracted. Distractions take many forms, and they can disrupt a driver’s concentration and focus. Driving is a dangerous activity when the driver is not paying attention to what is occurring on the road around them. Distracted drivers are often incapable of reacting to circumstances on the road, which can result in accidents.
  4. Seat belt compliance. Seat belt compliance laws are strictly enforced by police because use of a driver or passenger restraining device, such as a seat belt, during an accident can help save lives and reduce injuries. Seat belt compliance citations are often tacked on to other moving violations after a police officer notices that the driver or passenger was not fastened into his or her seat with a seat belt.

Contact Us for Professional Help

If you are facing criminal charges for a DUI, or a traffic citation for speeding or engaging in distracted driving, you need an experienced Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer to help you fight your charges. There is much at stake if you are convicted. Make sure to contact a lawyer immediately.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=062500050K11-501

Driving on a Suspended License in Illinois Can Mean Big Trouble

March 22nd, 2017 at 7:59 am

suspended license, Rolling Meadows Criminal Defense LawyerAfter your driver’s license has been suspended, either for racking up too many points for traffic violations or getting a DUI, there can be many pressures to continue driving without a license. It may be difficult to find alternative transportation to your job or to school. Or, taking public transit may be a challenge. You may be concerned about asking your friends or family to drive you because you do not want to be an inconvenience. However, if the state has suspended your driver’s license and you choose to continue driving despite being legally stripped of your driving privileges, you can face serious consequences if you are caught by law enforcement.

Driving on a suspended driver’s license is a criminal offense in Illinois under 625 ILCS 5/6-303. The charges are usually a Class A misdemeanor, but you could possibly be charged with a felony under certain circumstances. Whether you are charged with a misdemeanor or a felony will depend on the reason why your driver’s license was suspended in the first place.

There Are Serious Consequences for Driving on a Suspended License

Driving on a suspended license is not a small offense like a traffic ticket. It is a criminal offense that could put you in jail and could saddle you with a large fine. It also means that you might be sentenced to do community service and you will have a criminal record. It is possible that it could also take even longer to get your driving privileges reinstated because the Secretary of State will extend your driver’s license suspension period if you are convicted of driving on a suspended driver’s license. There is also the chance that your license could be permanently revoked.

There are other consequences that go along with a driving on a suspended license conviction. For instance, if the offense was a felony level offense, it could prevent you from voting, getting certain jobs, running for political or governmental office, getting certain business licenses, and even owning a gun.

There are nuances in the law and certain rules and procedures that need to be followed as you try to get your driver’s license reinstated. An experienced license reinstatement attorney can be a huge help in making sure that you do not make any mistakes that could make your situation worse. Do not take a chance by not having legal representation. Contact a lawyer as soon as you can to help you handle this matter.

Speak with a Driver’s License Reinstatement Lawyer About Getting Your License Back

If you have had your driving privileges suspended by the state of Illinois, then you need to look into getting your driver’s license reinstated. An experienced Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer can help you get everything in order to your driver’s license back as soon as you possibly can.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=062500050K6-303

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