Archive for the ‘Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney’ tag

New Traffic Laws 2017

May 8th, 2017 at 10:09 am

traffic laws 2017, Rolling Meadows Criminal Defense LawyerThere are a number of changes to the traffic laws in Illinois—changes of which to be aware because, unfortunately, ignorance of the law is not a defense. The laws encompass areas including:

  • When you are required to switch lanes or reduce your speed;
  • The distance you have to come to a complete stop in front of a railroad crossing;
  • The kind of lights a motorcycle can display for their rear stop lamps; and
  • Penalties resulting from a conviction for driving without insurance.

The laws take effect this year in 2017, and some have already been implemented and applied. Traffic violations may seem minor; however, violations can carry hefty consequences for an unsuspecting motorist. Moreover, traffic violations can result in the loss or suspension of a license and increased insurance rates. Additionally, depending on the severity, traffic violations can even result in jail time.

Changing Lanes and Decreasing Speed

For a long time it has been a law that when an emergency vehicle approaches drivers with its lights on, drivers are required to changed lanes and pull over to allow the vehicle to pass. HB 6006 now demands that, whenever possible, drivers change lanes when approaching any disabled vehicle on the road with hazard lights flashing. Also, when it is not possible to change lanes, drivers must decrease their speed.

Distance You Have to Stop Before a Railroad Crossing

SB 2806 is a new law that changes the distance you have to stop before approaching a railroad crossing where there is a posted stop sign. As of January 2017, any motorist who fails to stop within 50 feet from the nearest rail will be guilty of a petty offense with a $500 fine, up from the $250 fine it used to be for a first offense. For a second offense the fine is $1000.

Changes to Traffic Laws Involving Motorcycles

HB 4105 now allows for motorcycles to be equipped with blue lights on the rear of the motorcycle in conjunction with the motorcycle’s rear stop lamp. The blue lights increase visibility from longer distances and thus increases motorcycle safety during night time operation.

Penalties for Driving Without Proof of Insurance

Any vehicle that you operate must be insured—being pulled over without proof of insurance can prove costly. However, HB 5723 aims to ease the burden for those unlucky enough to not have proof of insurance at the time they are stopped. It is now a petty offense for first time offenders who are pulled over and do not have proof of insurance. Again, this only applies to first time offenders.

How to Avoid a Traffic Violation

If you find yourself a defendant in a traffic violation matter, speak with the skilled Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney at The Law Office of Christopher M. Cosley. Call 847-394-3200 to schedule your consultation today.

Sources:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/BillStatus.asp?DocTypeID=HB&DocNum=6006&GAID=13&SessionID=88&LegID=95513

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/billstatus.asp?DocNum=2806&GAID=13&GA=99&DocTypeID=SB&LegID=96116&SessionID=88

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/BillStatus.asp?DocTypeID=HB&DocNum=4105&GAID=13&SessionID=88&LegID=90325

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/BillStatus.asp?DocTypeID=HB&DocNum=5723&GAID=13&SessionID=88&LegID=95177

 

Leaving the Scene of a DUI Accident Can Lead to More Charges

April 7th, 2017 at 9:29 am

DUI Accident, Rolling Meadows Criminal Defense AttorneyCountless people in Illinois get behind the wheel while under the influence of alcohol or drugs, despite knowing that driving under the influence is illegal. A driver may think that he or she is sober enough to drive or will not get caught. However, if you are caught, you will quickly find out that Illinois law enforcement does not take DUI very lightly.

Police are often harsh on drivers who are intoxicated behind the wheel and they will often look for ways to stack up as many criminal charges against an intoxicated driver as possible. But in some situations the driver actually gives the police good reason to add on additional criminal charges.

Extra Charges When the DUI Results in An Accident

If you are driving under the influence and you cause an accident, either a single vehicle accident or an accident involving another vehicle, when police arrive at the scene, they will look for every way that they can to charge you with criminal charges in addition to your DUI. For instance, if an accident was the result of your speeding or reckless driving, police will charge you with DUI, in addition to a reckless driving or speeding charge.

Tacking on Charges When Leaving the Scene of An Accident

Sometimes a driver involved in a DUI accident might decide that he or she should leave the scene of the accident in order to protect himself or herself from being arrested. For instance, this is common when a drunk driver hits a parked car. The intoxicated driver might leave the scene of the accident, thinking that because no one saw the accident there will be no liability. This is very far from the truth.

Hitting a parked car and then leaving the scene of the accident is a hit and run. Once the owner of the parked car discovers that his or her vehicle was involved in a hit and run accident, he or she will report the accident to police and the police will investigate. You could very well be identified as the culprit if the police are able to successfully conduct their investigation. You could be charged with DUI, leaving the scene of an accident, and hit and run.

If the accident involved another vehicle and you try to flee the accident scene before the police arrive, you will face additional charges as well. On top of your DUI charge, you will be charged with leaving the scene of the accident, and could be charged with other offenses based on the circumstances of the accident. For instance, if you left someone injured at the accident scene and you did not try to help that person, you could be further charged with failure to render aid.

Contact Us Today for Help

Driving under the influence charges are serious, and your situation can get far worse if you leave the scene of an accident. Even if you know that you are likely to be charged with a DUI if you stay, it is important that you stay until police arrive if you have been involved in an accident. Dealing with the DUI is one thing, but the additional charges that can be tacked on against you if you leave the scene of an accident can make things much worse for you. Furthermore, it is in your best interests to contact a skilled Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney for help with your case.

Sources:

http://ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/documents/062500050K11-403.htm

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=062500050K11-501

What Should You Do if You Are Charged with Burglary in Rolling Meadows?

April 3rd, 2017 at 8:14 am

burglary, Rolling Meadows Criminal Defense AttorneyIf you have been arrested and charged with burglary, you are most likely feeling scared and unsure about what you should do next. A few questions might run through your head, including:

  • What is going to happen to you?
  • Are you going to go to jail?
  • What will court be like?
  • Is there anything that you can do to fight your charges?

Being charged with a crime is overwhelming, and you likely do not have a background in criminal law. That is why you need an experienced burglary criminal defense lawyer to help you fight your charges. Your lawyer understands the criminal justice system and is familiar with what happens in criminal court. You need guidance and advice as you deal with your criminal charges, and a seasoned lawyer can help you.

What Constitutes Burglary and Residential Burglary in Illinois?

Under 720 ILCS 5/19-1, burglary is defined as when a criminal defendant enters property owned by someone else knowingly and without permission, and with the intent to commit a theft or a felony once inside the property. The property can include homes, garages, guest houses, apartments, sheds, and house trailers. However, it can also include vehicles like cars, boats, airplanes, and even railroad cars.

Breaking into someone else’s property to steal something or to commit a felony crime, like a sexual assault, aggravated sexual assault, aggravated battery, aggravated assault, second domestic battery offense, or stalking, most likely constitutes burglary.

Burglary in and of itself is a Class 2 felony, which means that you will face felony level punishment for your felony level offense if you are convicted. But it is important to note that there is a distinction between burglary and residential burglary. Residential burglary involves the same elements as burglary except the property that is burglarized must be a home or dwelling and is codified under 720 ILCS 5/19-3. Residential burglary is a Class 1 felony.

Since burglary and residential burglary are felony offenses, it is critical that you have an experienced criminal defense lawyer to help you fight your charges. A conviction for burglary most likely means significant jail time and a hefty fine, and you will undoubtedly be burdened with a criminal record that can haunt you for years to come. That is why it is so important that you work with a criminal defense lawyer to fight your burglary charges.

What Can Happen if You Are Convicted?

If you are convicted for burglary, you will more than likely face jail time, although it could be possible to be placed under court supervision, which means you will not go to jail. It is critical to work with a criminal defense lawyer to present your strongest possible defense and mitigating circumstances to the court. While the goal is to get the charges dismissed, getting reduced charges or a reduced sentence could also be a good strategy for your criminal defense case.

Reach Out to Us Today for Help

A burglary charge in Illinois is a serious matter. Do not go up against your charges without the help of a lawyer. Please do not hesitate to contact a passionate Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney immediately for help with your case.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs4.asp?ActID=1876&ChapterID=53&SeqStart=62600000&SeqEnd=63400000

What Happens if You Are Charged with the Wrong Crime?

March 13th, 2017 at 9:40 am

charged with the wrong crime-Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyerEvery so often, a criminal defendant will be charged with the wrong crime after being arrested. For instance, the police may arrest an individual for having what they believe to be cocaine in his or her possession. However, after a sample of the drug is sent to a drug lab for testing, the substance might be identified as something else.

Cocaine, heroin, powdered methamphetamine, powdered ecstasy and ketamine all can have the same appearance as a white powder and it is possible for police to make a mistake and charge someone with a crime that is different than the crime that was committed.

Do Not Incriminate Yourself

It is very unlikely for a criminal defendant to speak up and correct law enforcement about the inaccuracy of the charges. Doing so would be incriminating to oneself. Therefore, since you are not talking, the police will charge you with the crime that they think you committed, and the state prosecutor will be given the charges once your criminal drug case makes it to court.  

Prosecutors Can Amend Your Drug Charges

Just because law enforcement charged you with the incorrect crime does not mean that you will not be prosecuted.You might think that the state will never be able to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that you committed the drug crime that you are accused of because the drug was something other than what law enforcement believed it to be. However, this is incorrect.

Once law enforcement and state prosecutors are clear on what drug you had in your possession—there is scientific analysis of the drug compound and the drug has been chemically identified—the prosecution will be able to update the charges that are being levied against you.

Illinois takes drug offenses and all other crimes very seriously. Therefore it is possible for state prosecutors to amend the charges that are pending against you when evidence comes to light that the crime that has been charged is inappropriate for the circumstances.

Does it Make a Difference?

The consequences for possession of many types of controlled substances are often very similar. Hence, you might be wondering: does being charged with the correct crime matter? There are some variations in the law concerning the punishment associated with possession of certain quantities of drugs.

Penalties for drug possession are usually based on the amount of drug that is found by law enforcement and the drug type. As such, it could be possible that you are charged with a drug offense that carries a more serious penalty than if you were charged with the correct crime.  

Drug Charges Require the Help of a Criminal Defense Attorney

Being charged with possession of a controlled substance is a big deal and it is important that you hire an experienced Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney to help you with your defense strategy. The consequences for a drug conviction can be hefty and can mean years of jail time. Your freedom is in jeopardy, so do not delay in getting a lawyer.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs4.asp?ActID=1966&ChapterID=54&SeqStart=19800000&SeqEnd=20700000

Changes to Illinois Traffic Laws For 2017

February 22nd, 2017 at 7:00 am

Illinois traffic laws, Rolling Meadows Criminal Defense Attorney,Every so often traffic laws are changed, and new laws are enacted by the state legislature to better address problems that are being experienced on the roads across Illinois. The year, 2017, is no exception.

A handful of traffic laws have been changed and Illinois drivers need to be aware of these alterations. A violation of these new laws can lead to a traffic citation, even if you did not know that you were breaking the law. Ignorance of the law is no excuse or defense to making a violation of the law. The laws have been changed to help improve driver safety in Illinois.

Scott’s Law Has Been Expanded

Illinois retains a law known as Scott’s law, which requires drivers to move over to the opposite side of the road when they are passing emergency vehicles and law enforcement vehicles that are on the side of the road. The purpose of law is to give law enforcement and emergency personnel the space that they need to safely render aid or do their job while on the side of the road.

In 2017, Scott’s law has been expanded. Now, in addition to moving over for emergency vehicles and law enforcement on the side of the road, Illinois drivers are also required to slow down and move over to the opposite side of the road when there is a vehicle parked on the side of the road with its hazard lights flashing.

Have You Been Caught a Second Time Driving Without Insurance? Now Your Car Will Be Towed

Driving without valid and up-to-date automobile insurance is a problem in Illinois. Another change to Illinois traffic laws in 2017 authorizes law enforcement to tow the vehicle of anyone who is stopped on the side of the road and is found to be driving without automobile insurance after already having a conviction on the books for driving without insurance. This new law only applies to drivers who are caught driving without insurance for the second time in a 12-month period after their earlier conviction.

While 2017 is not a significant year for changes in traffic law, the few changes that have been made will be strictly enforced by the police in Illinois. Therefore, it is important for drivers to be aware of these new changes. If you are issued a traffic citation for a violation of these laws or any other traffic law violation, you need to get in touch with an experienced traffic citation lawyer as soon as possible. Traffic citations need to be dealt with, and you can fight the charges that are being pressed against you by challenging them in traffic court.

Let Us Help You Today

When it comes to handling your traffic violation, you need a strong defense and a tenacious lawyer to fight the charges against you. Please do not hesitate to contact a passionate Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney for help with your case.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=062500050K11-907

Narcotic Drug Laws in Illinois

February 20th, 2017 at 8:37 am

narcotic drug, Rolling Meadows Criminal Defense LawyerSome of the most commonly committed drug offenses in Illinois involve narcotic drugs. Criminal defendants across Illinois are arrested and charged with possession, sale, distribution, or manufacturing of narcotics, but do not fully understand what those charges mean.

Often, people are unclear on what a narcotic drug is, and instead merely know drugs by their street names—heroin, cocaine, opium. For clarification, under Illinois law, narcotic drugs include:

  • Opium and opiates, such as:
    • Oxycodone;
    • Codeine;
    • Hydrocodone;
    • Methadone; and
    • Hydromorphone.
  • Heroin;
  • Cocaine; and
  • Ecgonine (a cocaine-like substance).

Illinois is tough on drug offenses involving narcotic drugs because of their highly addictive nature, and people who use these drugs often form physical and psychological dependencies on these drugs. There is also a risk that a person taking these drugs could overdose.

More Information About the Illinois Controlled Substances Act

The Illinois Controlled Substances Act lays out the law concerning the possession, manufacture and distribution of controlled substances in Illinois. Substances that are considered controlled substances are broken down into five groups, or schedules. The schedules are arranged in descending order concerning risk of potential abuse and whether the substance has practical medical applications.

Schedule I substances have a high risk of abuse, and no accepted medical use. Schedule V substances, on the other hand, have a low risk of potential abuse, and have a high level of medical applicability. Opiates are generally classed as Schedule I substances, while cocaine and cocaine-like substances are classified as Schedule II substances.

If you have been charged with a narcotics offense, an experienced defense lawyer can help you identify the exact charges you are facing and what the possible consequences can be if you are convicted. Your lawyer will review your charging document to properly identify the controlled substance offense with which you are charged. Based on the Schedule of the narcotic your lawyer can identify the portion of the Controlled Substances Act that applies to your offense.

Being caught in possession of a narcotic drug substance is a felony, and the degree of felony depends on how much of the substance is found in your possession. The sale or distribution of a narcotic in Illinois is a felony as well. Similarly, the manufacture of narcotics is also a felony level offense. A felony conviction can have a serious and long-lasting impact on your life. You will need an experienced drug offenses lawyer to help you fight the charges against you.

Call The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley

Criminal charges for possession of a controlled substance, distribution, or manufacturing are serious and they carry significant penalties if you are convicted. It is important for you to work with a skilled Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney who has experience handling drug cases like yours.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs5.asp?ActID=1941&ChapterID=53

Getting a Ticket for Leaving the Scene of an Accident in Illinois

February 15th, 2017 at 9:01 am

leaving the scene of an accident, Rolling Meadows Criminal Defense AttorneyAll too many people find themselves ticketed for leaving the scene of an accident in Illinois, and these drivers fail to understand that leaving the scene of an accident is not just a traffic violation—it is a criminal offense. As such, it is important to consult with an experienced criminal defense attorney if you have been ticketed for leaving the scene of an accident in Illinois. A skilled lawyer will be able to identify any potential defenses you have and will work hard to fight the charges that are pending against you.

There are several reasons why someone might leave the scene of an accident. For instance, you might panic because you do not know what to do. Or, you might leave because you think that there is nothing for you to do about the situation, such as when you accidentally hit a parked car and have no way to leave contact information and have no way to reach the driver of the vehicle you hit.

Sometimes drivers flee the scene of an accident because they are worried about facing other criminal charges in addition to the accident if police show up at the scene, such as driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol or reckless driving charges.

What Are Your Obligations if You Are Involved in a Motor Vehicle Accident?

Under 625 ILCS 5/11-402, leaving the scene of an accident in Illinois is illegal. If you are involved in a motor vehicle accident, you are supposed to stop immediately and remain at the scene until you can provide contact information (including providing your name address vehicle registration number and the name of the owner of the vehicle if it does not belong to you) to the affected parties, and/or until you render the appropriate aid for the given situation. In some situations, this could mean having to remain at the scene until law enforcement and/or emergency personnel arrive at the scene. You are also required to report the motor vehicle accident to the appropriate authorities under 625 ILCS 5/11-403 and you have 10 days to report the accident to the Illinois Secretary of State.

What Are the Consequences of Leaving the Scene of an Accident?

A conviction for leaving the scene of an accident is a misdemeanor, which can leave you with a criminal record, jail time, a fine, and a lengthy probation period. Additionally, a conviction for leaving the scene of an accident can result in long-term consequences as well. For instance, your driving privileges could be suspended or revoked and having a leaving the scene of an accident conviction on your record could prevent you from getting certain types of jobs in the future, especially if those jobs involve driving.

Consult With a Criminal Defense Lawyer Now

You should consult with an experienced criminal defense attorney if you have been charged with leaving the scene of an accident in Illinois. The potential consequences of a conviction are numerous, and you need to do everything that you can to help protect yourself and your rights.  Working with a passionate Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney who has years of experience handling these types of cases would be to your benefit.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=062500050K11-402

Types of Criminal Trespass and Attempted Criminal Trespass in Illinois

January 16th, 2017 at 7:00 am

criminal trespass, Rolling Meadows Criminal Defense AttorneyTrespassing is a serious offense, and many people in Illinois are charged with criminal trespass every year. If you are facing criminal trespassing charges, you should not delay in speaking with an experienced criminal defense attorney. A skilled lawyer can help you assess your legal options and can assist you with building a defense strategy.

Criminal trespassing under Illinois law occurs when a person unlawfully and without authority knowingly enters the property of another or remains on the property of another without permission. Criminal trespass exists in several forms including:

  • Criminal trespass to a residence. Under 720 ILCS 5/19-4, the crime occurs whenever you knowingly and without permission enter the residence of another. Alternatively, it can be criminal trespass to a residence if you enter someone’s residence with permission, but then stay longer than you were authorized to stay. Criminal trespass to a residence might occur if you may have been invited to someone’s home for a party, but then you did not leave when you were asked to leave and you stayed in the home after your permission to be there had expired or been revoked.
  • Criminal trespass to a vehicle. Under 720 ILCS 5/21-2, the crime of criminal trespass to a vehicle occurs when you access a vehicle belonging to someone else. The vehicle could be an automobile, a snowmobile, or a watercraft. It is also criminal trespass to a vehicle to operate someone else’s vehicle without permission. Carjacking or car theft is sometimes reduced to criminal trespass to a vehicle.
  • Criminal trespass to real property. Under 720 ILCS 5/21-3, the crime of criminal trespass to real property happens when you enter property belonging to someone else without permission. It is also criminal trespass to property if you were permitted to be on the property, but are then asked to leave but you do not. This offense is common in situations where bar or restaurant patrons are asked to leave a bar or restaurant for being disruptive or fighting, but they do not leave the premises. It is also common for people to be charged with criminal trespass to real property when there are posted signs prohibiting entry onto someone’s property but the signs are ignored.

When the prosecution is unable to establish every element required to convict you of criminal trespass, of either a residence, vehicle, or real property, it might be possible to reduce the charges against you to attempted criminal trespass. This means that there was evidence to suggest you were trying to commit a criminal trespass but did not successfully complete the trespass.

Criminal Trespassing Charges Need A Defense Lawyer

Criminal trespassing charges can truly affect your future in a negative manner. You need the help of an experienced professional who will be able to help you through the legal system. Do not hesitate and reach out to an experienced Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney as soon as possible.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=072000050K19-4

Charged With Multiple Cocaine Offenses in Illinois

January 11th, 2017 at 8:30 am

cocaine offenses, Rolling Meadows Criminal Defense AttorneyDrug trafficking, and cocaine trafficking in particular, is a serious felony offense in Illinois. The crime of drug trafficking involves knowingly selling, transporting, and importing controlled substances, such as cocaine, with the intent to manufacture or deliver the drugs.

There are two different sets of laws that govern criminal charges associated with cocaine trafficking. When the drug offense is committed within the state of Illinois, generally state law applies to the case. However, if a drug offense is committed across multiple jurisdictions, i.e., the drug offense involved activities occurring in two separate states, then the matter falls under the purview of federal law.

Transporting Cocaine Across State Lines Leads to Federal Drug Charges

One of the most common ways that drug charges go from being a strictly state matter to a federal matter, is when drugs are transported across state lines. Getting drugs like cocaine across state lines can involve:

  • Transporting cocaine across state lines by automobile or bus;
  • Transporting cocaine across state lines by using the rail system;
  • Transporting cocaine across state lines by using a boat across Lake Michigan; or
  • Transporting cocaine across state lines by use of a private plane, jet or commercial airline.

Whether your cocaine drug charges are at the state or federal level, if you are facing drug charges at all you need to speak with an experienced criminal defense attorney serving Rolling Meadows and the surrounding areas. Your criminal defense lawyer will know the intricacies of the law regarding cocaine possession, distribution, and transportation, and your lawyer will help prepare the best defense possible in light of your particular circumstances. You deserve fair treatment under the law and a skilled criminal defense attorney will fight so that you can get the best possible outcome in light of your specific situation.

Charged With Two Crimes: Trafficking and Possession

Generally if you are facing cocaine trafficking charges, you were likely caught in the act by law enforcement or you were implicated in the crime from some other evidence, such as videotape footage, testimony from others involved in the crime, etc. Many times, defendants who are charged with cocaine trafficking are also charged with cocaine possession, since they are usually found by law enforcement to be in actual possession of the cocaine that was being trafficked.

It is common practice for law enforcement in Illinois to charge a defendant with as many crimes as possible at the time of arrest. If the offense even closely resembles a crime, the arresting officer will likely charge the defendant with it. This is referred to as “stacking” or “multiplying” the charges against the defendant and it is to the prosecution’s advantage. By effectively charging you with every possible crime that facts and circumstances surrounding your offense could possibly justify, the prosecution is given the best possible chance to have charges stick in court to turn into a conviction.

For Defense Against Cocaine Charges: Call The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley

If you have been arrested and charged with a cocaine offense, you need to work with a skilled Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney who has years of experience handling drug cases like yours. We are prepared to help you today.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs4.asp?ActID=1941&ChapterID=53&SeqStart=5200000&SeqEnd=7900000

Choosing a DUI Defense Lawyer: What You Should Know

December 23rd, 2016 at 9:20 am

Choosing a DUI Defense Lawyer, Rolling Meadows Criminal Defense AttorneyIf you are arrested for driving under the influence (DUI) of drugs or alcohol in Illinois, it is critically important that you fight the criminal charges that are pending against you. In order to do that, you will need an experienced DUI criminal defense attorney by your side fighting for you the whole way. These are important charges that you need to get reduced or dismissed—the consequences of being convicted for a DUI are life-altering and long-lasting. At worst, a lawyer can simply ensure that you receive fair treatment under the law. Consider the following when looking for a DUI defense attorney.

An Attorney Who is Qualified and Experienced

If you have been charged with a DUI, it is important to hire an attorney who is experienced in handling DUI defenses just like yours. An experienced DUI criminal defense attorney will know the specifics of the law, will understand the criminal court system, and will listen to you as you explain what happened that caused you to get arrested. The outcome of your defense will impact your life in a big way. Do not put your fate into the hands of an inexperienced attorney.

Consider Interviewing Prospective Lawyers

Do not be afraid to request an interview with a few criminal defense attorneys that you are considering hiring. Conducting an interview will give you a chance to meet the attorney in person and have an initial conversation together. Conducting an interview is a great opportunity to determine if the attorney will really listen to you, and can help you determine if he or she is a good communicator.

What is the Cost?

It is a good idea to figure out up front how a criminal defense attorney will be paid for his or her time and what that time will cost you. You will want a lawyer who is appropriately priced for your particular circumstances, and you should get a better understanding about how your lawyer will bill you before he or she begins working on your defense.

Get a Lawyer Who Will Explore All of Your Legal Options

Having options is good.  It is best to work with a criminal defense attorney who will consider all of the legal options that are available to you. It is even better if your attorney can tell you about the pros and cons of each legal option you have, and the likelihood of success that each option offers you.

Call The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley

When you need to hire a passionate Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney to help you with your DUI defense, make sure that you take some time to figure out which attorney is right for you. Criminal defense attorneys are not all alike, and you may find that you can work better with a certain attorney, rather than others.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=062500050K11-501