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Archive for the ‘drug crimes’ tag

A Drug Crime Conviction Could Lead to You Being Deported

April 21st, 2017 at 9:30 am

drug crime conviction, Rolling Meadows Drug Crimes Defense LawyerMany people who live in Rolling Meadows and the surrounding communities do not have United States citizenship. These individuals are living in the U.S. on a visa or as a permanent resident, or because they hold a green card. Immigrants who are in the United States legally, or even illegally, and find themselves in trouble with the law over drug offenses could face deportation or removal from the country if they are convicted.

Non-U.S. citizens who are deported are often prevented from reentering the country again for many years after their deportation. Often times, non-U.S. citizens who are convicted for drug crimes involving controlled substances or methamphetamines are more likely to be deported or removed from the country than someone who is convicted for marijuana possession based on small quantities of marijuana. The harder and more addictive the drug that is involved in the crime, the more serious the consequences may be upon conviction.

The Challenges of Deportation

When a non-U.S. citizen (also known as a foreign national or a legal alien) is convicted for a drug crime in Illinois, deportation from the United States is often one of the most serious consequences for his or her criminal activity. Deportation back to a native country can be a big problem for someone who is convicted for a drug crime, especially if he or she does not know anyone in his or her native country, has no family connections in his or her native country, or does not speak his or her native country’s language. Not only that, but it is very likely that the immigrant has built a life in the United States. He or she most likely has family, friends, a job, and a life here in Illinois and he or she could lose it all if convicted with drug charges.

Fight Your Drug Charges to Avoid Deportation

The best way to avoid being deported is to not be convicted on your drug charges. If you are not convicted, then the federal government does not have grounds to force your deportation or removal from the country. Getting the drug charges against you dropped or dismissed is your best bet.

By working with an experienced drug crimes defense lawyer, you will give yourself your best shot at success for beating your charges. An experienced criminal defense lawyer will review the facts of your case and your arrest and will identify each possible grounds for defense. Together, you and your lawyer will decide on a defense strategy.

Reach Out to Us for Help

More often than not, first time offenders who are convicted of minor drug offenses often avoid being deported. However, there is no guarantee that you will not be deported if you are convicted of a drug related offense in Illinois. Drug charges need to be taken seriously, and especially so if you are not a U.S. citizen. Please do not hesitate to contact a passionate Rolling Meadows drug crimes defense attorney immediately for assistance with your case.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs5.asp?ActID=1941&ChapterID=53

Illinois May Have a Good Samaritan Law for Reporting Overdoses, Yet You Could Still be Charged with Drug Crimes

April 14th, 2016 at 7:00 am

Illinois good samaritan law, overdose, Rolling Meadows Drug Crimes AttorneyIn an effort to help combat the heroin epidemic that has been plaguing the United States in the past few years, in 2012 the Illinois Controlled Substances Act and the Methamphetamine Control and Community Protection Act was amended to include a provision that provides limited immunity from prosecution for those who witness an overdose and call for help. In other words, those who report an overdose can avoid at least some drug charges. The provision is codified in 720 ILCS 570/414, and is sometimes referred to as the Illinois Good Samaritan Overdose Law.

Good Samaritan Overdose Law Limited to Possession of Drugs That Can Cause Overdoses

The overdose law offers protection to those who report an overdose. However, the protection offered by the law is strictly limited to possession and is limited to small quantities of drugs that are capable of causing an overdose. Those who seek medical attention for someone who is overdosing will not be charged with a Class 4 felony for possession of a controlled, counterfeit, or look-alike substance or a controlled substance analog if evidence for a Class 4 charge was acquired as a result of seeking help for the person who is overdosing.

The law is only applicable if a small quantity of drugs are found at the scene of the overdose, such as:

  • Less than three grams of heroin, cocaine, morphine or LSD;
  • Less than six grams of pentazocine (an opioid), quaaludes, PCP or ketamine; or
  • Less than 40 grams of peyote, barbiturates, amphetamines, or any Schedule I or II narcotics.  

But the Law Does Not Protect Against a Lot of Other Potential Charges

The law does not protect against drug charges for other drugs, such as cannabis, methamphetamines or other controlled substances. Nor does the law protect those who report overdose victims from other drug charges, such as possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of cannabis, possession of methamphetamines, and drug delivery.

Those who report the overdose could also face other criminal charges if the circumstances warrant such charges, such as driving with a revoked or suspended license, DUI, or aggravated battery (if the person who reported the overdose is suspected of assisting the victim in injecting him or herself with the drug that caused the overdose).

So while you might be doing the “right thing” by calling for medical assistance if you witness someone overdosing on drugs, you should be aware that the overdose law only offers you limited protection from criminal prosecution. It is very easy in an overdose situation to find evidence of other crimes that you would not be immune to under the overdose law.

Contact Us for Help with Your Case

Just because there is a good samaritan overdose reporting law, it does not mean that you are protected against all criminal charges you might face if the cops show up. There are a number of other drug charges you could face. Please contact a Rolling Meadows drug crimes attorney immediately if you have been arrested after reporting an overdose. Our attorneys are prepared to assist you today.

Sources:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs3.asp?ActID=2733

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=072005700K414

Treatment, Not Jail: A New Approach to Handling Heroin Addiction in Illinois

December 8th, 2015 at 9:13 am

Illinois drug crimes attorney, Illinois defense lawyer, Illinios criminal attorney, Heroin addiction in the United States is running rampant, with some areas of the country so affected by the prevalence of heroin addiction that the media often refers to it as a “heroin epidemic.” Heroin is very addictive and in recent years it has become popular to mix heroin with other high-enhancing drugs, which has led to an unfortunate and sobering number of deaths.

A New Approach: Treatment Programs, Instead of Jail Time

Police in small towns across Illinois are taking steps to try and help heroin addicts beat their addiction by providing assistance rather than punishment when addicts come forward seeking help. By working with addicts who want to get off heroin, police officers are getting these addicted individuals into detox facilities and into rehabilitation programs rather than putting them in jail. Addicts can even bring their drugs and paraphernalia to the police station for disposal, and the police will not press charges for heroin possession or possession of drug paraphernalia.

By targeting the demand for heroin, rather than trying to control the supply, law enforcement could be nipping the heroin problem in the bud. The model employed by Illinois police is modeled after a similar technique recently undertaken by police in Gloucester, Massachusetts.

Areas in Illinois That Are Trying This Approach

After the police officers in Gloucester, Massachusetts were met with so much success when they rolled out their treatment instead of drug charges plan, other law enforcement took notice and began implementing their own version of this program. Some of the towns in Illinois that have adopted some form of this new approach to curbing heroin activity on the streets include:

  • Rolling Meadows. Rolling Meadows police offer the Second Chance-Heroin Amnesty Program, where heroin addicts can go to the Rolling Meadows police station for intervention assistance with opiate addiction.
  • Dixon. According to the Chicago Tribune, law enforcement in Dixon, Illinois has already successfully helped 20 individuals who have come forward seeking treatment for their heroin addiction. Dixon law enforcement was moved to make a change in how they were handling heroin cases when three people died of heroin overdose in February of 2015.

How Do These Programs Work?

The programs all share an overarching approach where an addict can come to a police station and request help with getting off heroin. The addict can bring any heroin, needles or other paraphernalia and turn it over to police, without risking having criminal drug charges raised. The program is explained to the heroin addict, and he or she is escorted to a rehab facility where he or she can get clean.

The system is not perfect. People seeking help must voluntarily show up to the police station and request help; a person cannot get arrested for heroin and then claim to want to participate in the rehabilitation program. Additionally, there are individuals who will voluntarily enter the rehab program who will ultimately relapse. But at least steps are being taken to try and address the core issue of addiction.

Call the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley

To take advantage of these amnesty programs offered by local law enforcement, an individual must approach the police voluntarily. Being caught with drugs will not qualify you for the amnesty under these programs. If you are facing heroin charges, or any other criminal drug charges, please contact a passionate Rolling Meadows defense attorney immediately. Call the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley at (847) 394-3200 for an initial consultation on your case.

 

Sources:

http://www.boston.com/news/local/massachusetts/2015/05/05/gloucester-cops-addicts-ask-for-help-and-won-arrest-you/9nrZEse0deDpPqt1t1VozI/story.html

http://www.ci.rolling-meadows.il.us/612/Second-Chance-Heroin-Amnesty-Program

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-heroin-addiction-police-help-met-20151108-story.html

Probable Cause: When Are Police Allowed to Search a Vehicle without a Warrant?

July 15th, 2015 at 3:45 pm

your rights, Illinois defense lawyer, Illinois criminal attorney,Two of the most common types of criminal charges are drug charges and weapons charges. These two types of cases have something in common. They often involve a police officer searching some area (like a car or a home or a person) and finding an item that is the very basis of the crime, like a gun or drugs. Of course, many people understand that in most situations the police need a warrant to go in and search someone’s home. This is ultimately because of the Fourth Amendment. However what many people do not understand is that, because of some United States Supreme Court decisions, the police usually do not need a warrant to search a vehicle.

Occasionally the Police Need a Warrant to Search a Car

Very often police do not need a warrant to search your vehicle. Certainly, however, there are some exceptions. For example, if your car is being stored in your garage at your home and none of the warrant exceptions apply that would allow the police to search your home without a warrant, then they probably cannot search the car without a warrant (or your permission) either. This is because without your permission or a warrant, they cannot go into the garage. However, if your car were parked on a public street in front of your house, then a warrant likely would not be required.

Most of the Time the Cops Do Not Need a Warrant

Most of the time police officers do not need a warrant to search a car that you are out driving around. This exception to the Fourth Amendment dates back to a case almost as old as automobiles, known as Carroll v. United States. In this case from 1925 the United States Supreme Court ruled that an officer can search an automobile without a warrant so long as the officer has “probable cause” to believe that either evidence or contraband is in the automobile. Probable cause is one of the lowest burdens of proof in our legal system. The reasoning behind this ruling is two-fold.

First of all, since by their very nature cars are movable, there is a real threat of evidence destruction if officers have to wait for a warrant. Secondly, the Court theorized that there is less of an expectation of privacy in a car then there is in a home since cars are operated on public roadways under state regulations. Motor homes that are readily mobile, trailers pulled by trucks, boats, house boats, and airplanes are also covered by this exception.

Call the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley

If you are the suspect in a crime, or if you have already been charged, you will need help. There are many issues to consider beyond just whether or not you are guilty. In many cases there are important constitutional issues at stake like issues regarding the Fourth Amendment. In these cases you need someone on your side who has an in depth understanding of the law. You will need the help of an experienced Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney. Call the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley today at (847)394-3200.

Practical Aspects of Medical Marijuana Law Remain a Challenge

June 24th, 2015 at 4:38 pm

Illinois defense attorney, Illinois criminal lawyer, Illinois drug crimes attorney,In Illinois and in other states around the country, marijuana has being legalized for certain limited purposes, usually for medicinal use when certain requirements are met. The medical marijuana law was passed in January of 2014 in Illinois, but the state has run into several issues in implementing it. One of the most recent hurdles to overcome in the process of establishing medical marijuana dispensaries involves determining from what sources to obtain the seeds necessary to plant the drug.

Getting Started

Those who are interested in getting into the business of legally selling medical marijuana must overcome several hurdles in order to do so. Many requirements and regulations are written into the relevant law, including obtaining licenses, planning for security, and planning for building the facility. Once that is accomplished, growers must then decide where to obtain their first seeds or cuttings, which would enable them to actually grow marijuana for medicinal purposes. Some are arguing that this presents a challenge for legal reasons.

With the medical marijuana industry just emerging in Illinois, sellers and growers have many logistical issues to take into account. When it comes to actually growing the marijuana to be used for medical purposes, the medical marijuana law is reportedly not clear on how to actually begin the process. Some say that regulators are essentially supposed to look the other way at this stage, but the problem is widespread.

“First Seed” Problem

Those getting involved in the industry are considering the problem an odd, albeit likely unintended, consequence of the law. Still, it leaves growers with two options: go underground or travel to another state to obtain seeds, although either action would most likely be a violation of law, either on the state or federal level. Growing permits are expected to be issued in Illinois by the end of the year. At this point, it seems growers will be faced with either obtaining seeds on the black market or possibly ordering them online from companies who advertise discreet shipping practices. The question remains, what legal effect will this have on growers?

Some are supposedly expecting law enforcement to simply turn a blind eye for a limited “don’t ask, don’t tell” period of time. This is usually the case in states where the relevant medical marijuana law is silent on the issue of obtaining seeds, after which the plants are generally required to be registered. In Illinois, officials seemed to offer vague responses when asked directly about the issue, and suggested they would be open to considering plan proposals from applicants on how to get their operation started. However, many maintain that until there is a definitive, government approved guideline on the issue, states will have no choice but to look the other way.

Criminal Defense Attorney

If you or someone you know has been charged with a drug crime in the Chicago area, do not hesitate to contact the experienced Rolling Meadows defense attorneys at the Law Office of Christopher M. Cosley to schedule a consultation. We have offices located in Rolling Meadows and Chicago.

Illinois Considering Decriminalizing Certain Amounts of Marijuana Possession

May 25th, 2015 at 6:20 am

Illinois defense attorney, Illinois criminal lawyer, drug crimes, Illinios drug laws,Drug possession is one of the most prosecuted crimes in the American criminal justice system. Far too many people spend serious time in our jails and prisons for simply possessing a personal use quantity of a controlled substance. In fact, many of the people who are prosecuted possessed only marijuana. Fortunately, some states are taking steps to lessen or eliminate the penalties for marijuana possession. While Illinois has not yet taken steps to legalize marijuana possession, it is taking steps to decriminalize the substance.

Senate Committee Passed Important Marijuana Bill

The State Journal-Register reports that a state senate committee has passed a bill that would treat marijuana possession like a speeding ticket. The bill is called House Bill 218. If the current version of this bill were to become law it would make possession of 15 grams or less of marijuana punishable by a fine of up to $125. People who received one of these tickets would be eligible to have their records expunged after six months. To put this into perspective, 15 grams is roughly a half-ounce of marijuana, or enough to make between 20 and 30 joints. This bill already passed in the House by a vote of 62-53. The next step is for the full Senate to vote on the bill. If it passes there, it would go to the governor. Governor Bruce Rauner has not made any public statements about his position on the law, but he has made public statements supporting the idea of reducing our state’s incarcerated population. Supporting this bill would certainly accomplish that goal.

Bill Would Also Change DUI Standards

House Bill 218 would also change the standards for driving under the influence of marijuana charges. Currently Illinois law is out of touch with science. Under the current law, finding any amount of any marijuana metabolite in a person’s urine is enough for a DUI conviction. This is horribly unscientific because these metabolites can show up for weeks after a person uses marijuana while marijuana only affects a person for a few hours. If the new law were to pass, the standards for a DUI would require certain amounts of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol in either the blood or another bodily substance. Facts do not exist to support that these standards would actually prove intoxication from a scientific perspective, but they are at least less oppressive than the standards under the current law.

Call the Law Office of Christopher M. Cosley

If you have been charged with possession of marijuana or any other drug you will need the help of an experienced Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney. Don’t hesitate to call the Law Office of Christopher M. Cosley. We regularly handle drug cases so we understand both the legal and personal issues involved in these cases. We will steer you in the right direction given your personal circumstances. Call us today at (847)394-3200.

Juvenile Drug Court: An Option for Some Teens

May 4th, 2015 at 5:42 am

Illinois defense attorney, Illinois criminal lawyer, Illinios juvenile crime attorney,Part of being a teenager is testing boundaries and experimenting with new experiences. Unfortunately, some teenagers choose to push the boundaries of the law and experiment with illegal substances. For some of these young people the only real consequences are the consequences of getting caught, but others find themselves with serious drug problems. There are legal steps that can be taken in order to help these juveniles get the drug treatment they need.

The Juvenile Drug Court Treatment Act

The legislature found that a substantial portion of the resources of Illinois’ juvenile justice system went to young people who were using and abusing drugs. In response, it passed the Juvenile Drug Court Treatment Act. Drug courts in the adult system are special court programs designed to get drug offenders the treatment and life skills they need instead of using taxpayer funds just to lock them up for a short period of time and then release them with their drug addiction still in full force. In the adult system these programs are typically run on the local level. They involve drug treatment, programs to help adult drug offenders find employment, and often involve community service aspects. They are usually much more intensive than many other outpatient treatment options. Drug courts can also, when appropriate, order offenders to do inpatient treatment. Often when offenders successfully complete these programs they receive some benefit when it comes to their criminal charges such as a lessened punishment or even in some cases a complete dismissal. The idea of the Juvenile Drug Court Treatment Act was to create a similar sort of program for young people who are having their cases heard in juvenile court and thus normally would not be eligible for adult drug court programs.

What Minors Can Get into Drug Courts?

The important thing about drug court is that neither side can be forced into it. Both the minor charged with a crime and the prosecutor involved must agree to drug court, and the court must approve it as well. Certain juvenile offenders automatically cannot be considered for drug court under Illinois law. These include:

  • Juveniles who are charged with crimes of violence, which include but are not limited to: first or second degree murder, predatory criminal sexual assault of a child, criminal sexual assault, armed robbery, aggravated arson, arson, aggravated kidnapping, kidnapping, aggravated battery resulting in great bodily harm or permanent disability, stalking, aggravated stalking, or any offense involving the discharged of a firearm;
  • Juveniles who deny their use or addiction to drugs;
  • Juveniles who do not demonstrate a willingness to participate in treatment; and
  • Juveniles who have been found delinquent at any point in the last 10 years because of one of the crimes of violence listed above.

What Happens if a Minor Successfully Completes Drug Court

If a minor is admitted into a drug court program and then he or she successfully completes the program, this can benefit his or her juvenile charges. One possible result can be a dismissal of charges. If the juvenile enters the drug court after admitting to the charges and being sentenced, finishing drug court can count as a successful completion of the sentence and the juvenile can be discharged from any further proceedings in the court.

Call the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley Today

When your child is facing drug charges, you need the help of an experienced Rolling Meadows juvenile criminal defense attorney. There are programs for juveniles that can be used to get them the help that they need rather than focusing on punishment alone. Call the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley today at (847)394-3200.

Unlawful Transfer of a Telecommunications Device to a Minor

February 12th, 2015 at 9:11 am

Illinois criminal defense attorney, Illinois defense lawyer, Illinios drug crimes attorney, Most crimes are standalone crimes. However, there are some crimes that act as add-ons of a sort or as ways for the prosecution to try to punish someone not just for committing a crime, but also for the way in which he or she committed the crime. These additional offenses can increase the severity of the possible punishment for a crime, which makes it extremely important that you have the assistance of an experienced criminal defense attorney. One example of this sort of additional offense is a crime many have never heard of: unlawful transfer of a telecommunications device.

What is Unlawful Transfer of a Telecommunications Device?

From the name of this crime, it sounds like it might have something to do with defrauding a cell phone company or giving a kid a cell phone without his or her parents’ permission. While either of those activities can land you in hot water, they are not quite what this law is about. Under Illinois statute you are guilty of this crime if you transfer a telecommunications device (like a cell phone) to someone under the age of 18 with the intent that the device be used to commit a crime under the Illinois criminal code, the Cannabis Control Act, the Illinois Controlled Substances Act, or the Methamphetamine Control and Community Protection Act. This crime is a Class A misdemeanor, which means you could be sentenced to a term in jail not to exceed one year. Property forfeiture is also a possibility. Thus, if one were to participate in a criminal enterprise of some sort with a minor and that person were to give the minor a cell phone or similar device in order to facilitate that criminal offense, the person could be charged both with that underlying crime and with this additional crime.

What Counts as a Telecommunications Device?

The most obvious type of covered device is a cell phone. But many other devices are also covered. Any device that is portable or that can be installed in a mode of transportation and that is capable of transmitting speech, data, signals, or other information is included. This means that pagers or beepers are covered, along with radio transceivers, transmitters, and receivers. It is worth noting that a radio designed to receive only standard AM and FM radio broadcasts is specifically exempted from the law.

Call the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley

When you are charged with a crime you need the help of an experienced Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer. Call the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley. When you call us at (847)394-3200 we will set up an appointment to go over the facts of your case and figure out how we can help.

Congress Says No Funds to go to Medical Marijuana Prosecutions

December 30th, 2014 at 8:18 am

drug possession, Illinois drug crimes attorney, drug dealing, Illinois defense lawyer,After generations of taking a hardline stance on the War on Drugs, Congress finally effectively ended the federal government’s ban on medical marijuana, at least for now. This extraordinary news can provide comfort for those involved in Illinois’ medical marijuana program. Rather than facing potential federal drug charges, nationwide users, growers, and sellers who comply with state laws regulating medical marijuana will finally be able to relax when it comes to the fear of federal prosecution.

Congress Cuts Funding for Medical Marijuana Prosecutions

While Congress did not actually “legalize” medical marijuana on a federal level, it did the next best thing. The Los Angeles Times reports that Congress included language in its massive spending bill that cut funding for prosecuting these crimes. So while operating a medical marijuana dispensary is still technically a violation of federal law, federal agents and prosecutors will not be able to prosecute these crimes because they will not have the money to do so, so long as the so-called criminal is complying with state laws regarding medical marijuana. Congress’ action comes on the coattails of the Obama administration’s efforts to follow a similar policy over the last year, but Congress’ action is the first time that the federal government has actually codified any type of decriminalization of marijuana since criminalizing it in the first place.

What this Means for Illinois Medical Marijuana

It is a little unclear whether Congress’ action will have any immediate practical effect in Illinois. This is because while our legislature has authorized the use of medical marijuana, we currently don’t have any legally authorized medical marijuana dispensaries. Illinois is preparing to authorize the first dispensaries, and state officials are expected to announce who will receive the first licenses in the state to sell medical marijuana some time before the end of the year. Ultimately there will be 21 grow centers and 60 dispensaries spread across the states. Once these businesses are actually licensed and up and running, they will have a much easier road than dispensaries in other states like California faced when they opened for business only to be subjected to raids by the FBI and DEA. But until these businesses actually are up and running, there will be no one lawfully dispensing medical marijuana under Illinois law, so the new federal law will have no effect here.

Criminal Defense Attorney

If you find yourself accused of a drug crime you will need the assistance of an experienced criminal defense lawyer. Contact the experienced Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorneys at the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley and schedule a consultation today.

Drug Court in Illinois

November 20th, 2014 at 2:57 pm

drug addict, drug laws, Illinios criminal defense attorney, Many involved in the criminal justice system as the result of drug charges are battling a serious addiction. But for the drug dependency of these offenders, they most likely would not participate in illegal or criminal activity. In instances such as these, courts and law enforcement usually recognize the unique needs of these defendants and attempt to address them. Often times, this may involve the defendant participating in an alternative program known as drug court.

Drug Court FAQs

A recent news article touting the crime-reducing benefits of drug court in some counties goes on to explain some basic information regarding the program. Many counties in Illinois have formed drug court as a division of the Circuit Court. The eligible participants are ideally nonviolent drug-dependent offenders who are willing to submit to intensive treatment and accountability-based supervision in order to address their criminal charges and get a new chance at life. They are closely monitored by a judge and a larger drug court team.

The benefits of drug court are not limited to treatment. A relatively high percentage of participants who successfully complete the program have remained crime-free two years after completion. Some counties in Illinois boast a higher success rate than the 75 percent national average. Only one-third of similar defendants sentenced to traditional forms of punishment enjoy the same success. In short, well-run drug courts seem to be effective in bringing about higher rates of recovery from addiction as well as lower rates of drug-related crime.

Each drug court may operate under a slightly different set of rules and regulations decided by the chief judge within a particular county. In general, and in addition to the drug court judge, the rest of the team is made up of representatives from the District Attorney’s Office, the Public Defender’s Office, drug counselors, and probation officers. In order to qualify to participate in drug court, an offender must meet certain criteria including the absence of any disqualifying offenses (usually violent crimes), a finding that the offender is drug dependent, and final approval from the drug court team. If approved, the defendant will be required to enter a guilty plea and be placed on probation for a specified amount of time, as well as receive a jail term that is held open in the event the participant violates the rules of the program. If successful in the participation and completion of the program, the offender may be able to avoid a prison term altogether.

Criminal Defense Attorney

Drug court may be a viable alternative for drug-dependent criminal defendants. The experienced Rolling Meadows defense attorneys at the Law Office of Christopher M. Cosley can discuss your case with you and advise you of your rights if you have been charged with a drug offense. Contact us today to schedule a consultation. We serve clients in Cook County and the surrounding areas.

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