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Archive for the ‘Disorderly Conduct’ tag

Illinois’ Disorderly Conduct Law

July 19th, 2017 at 12:50 pm

Disorderly Conduct, felony offense, misdemeanor, Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney, disorderly conduct defenseWhen an individual disturbs the peace in a manner that threatens public safety, it is likely that he or she has committed the crime of disorderly conduct. However, each state defines disorderly conduct a bit differently. Therefore, in order to determine whether a disruptive individual in Illinois can be rightfully convicted of disorderly conduct, one must closely examine our state’s disorderly conduct statute.

Illinois Compiled Statutes Section 26-1: Disorderly Conduct

Under 720 ILCS 5/26-1 a person commits disorderly conduct in Illinois when he or she knowingly:

  • Acts in an unreasonable manner as to alarm or disturb another person and to incite a breach of the peace;
  • Tells, or causes another to tell, the fire department that there is a fire while knowing that it is not reasonable to believe that the fire exists;
  • Reports, or causes another to report, that an explosive device or a container holding a dangerous substance is hidden somewhere where its detonation or release would pose a risk to human life while knowing that it is not reasonable to believe that such a device or container exists;
  • Reports, or causes another to report, a threat of destruction against a school, or a threat of violence, death, or bodily harm aimed at people attending school or a school function;
  • Notifies, or causes another to notify, a police officer that an offense is currently being committed, will be committed, or has been committed while knowing that it is not reasonable to believe that what they are saying is true;
  • Makes a false report, or causes another to make a false report, to a public safety agency while knowing that it is not reasonable to believe that making such a report is necessary for the public welfare and safety;
  • Calls 911 with a false alarm or complaint while knowing that it is not reasonable to make such a call;
  • Transmits, or causes another to transmit, a false report to the Department of Children and Family Services or the Department of Public Health;
  • Issues, or causes another to issue, a false request for emergency medical services or for an ambulance from the police or fire department while knowing that it is not reasonable to believe that such assistance is required;
  • Makes a false report, or causes another to make a false report, under Article II of Public Act 83-1432;
  • Enters the property of another for a lewd or unlawful purpose and deliberately looks into a dwelling through a window or other opening; or
  • While acting as the employee of a collection agency, makes a phone call to an alleged debtor with the purpose of harassing, annoying, or intimidating them.

Penalties

In Illinois, disorderly conduct can be charged as either a misdemeanor or a felony offense. Those convicted of misdemeanor disorderly conduct can face up to 30 days, six months, or one year in jail (depending on whether the offense was charged as a Class C, Class B, or Class A misdemeanor) and a fine of up to $2,500. However, those convicted of felony disorderly conduct can be sentenced to serve up to three or five years in prison (depending on whether the offense was charged as a Class 4 or Class 3 felony) and ordered to pay a fine of up to $10,000. Additionally, violators may also be ordered to perform community service.

Contact a Rolling Meadows Disorderly Conduct Defense Lawyer Today

A disorderly conduct conviction can carry serious consequences in Illinois and should not be taken lightly. If you have been charged with disorderly conduct and would like to discuss your legal options with an experienced Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney, contact the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley today.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=072000050K26-1

Peeping in a Window is a Form of Disorderly Conduct

March 20th, 2017 at 8:42 am

peeping in a window, Rolling Meadows Criminal Defense LawyerThere are several different offenses that constitute disorderly conduct under Illinois law. However, one of the least obvious forms of disorderly conduct is voyeurism, or “peeping,” which is an invasion of privacy of someone else. The victim, or person who is spied upon, has had his or her personal space violated by the peeping act, and the Illinois courts take the invasion of privacy very seriously.

Like many of the other forms of disorderly conduct, the offense of peeping often involves a state of intoxication—but certainly not always. Being drunk is no excuse under the law for invading the privacy of another by spying on him or her in their home. However, it does lend context to how the peeping incident may have come to pass.

Many criminal defendants who are charged with disorderly conduct for peeping on someone did so as a result of exercising poor judgement, while in a state of intoxication, or were acting in response to peer pressure.

Whatever the case may be for you, if you are facing disorderly conduct charges for peeping, it is important that you work with a lawyer to fight the charges that are pending against you. You are facing a conviction on a misdemeanor offense. You could go to jail, pay a fine, get a criminal record, and you could develop a reputation if you are convicted.

What Constitutes “Peeping” Under Illinois Law?

Under 720 ILCS 5/26-1(a)(11), someone who looks into a dwelling through a window or other opening for the purpose of being lewd or for spying is considered a voyeur. The act must be done deliberately and for a lewd or unlawful purpose. There is a difference between accidentally and coincidentally looking into someone’s window and doing so with the deliberate intent of unlawfully watching someone through a window.

Deliberately peeping or spying on someone without his or her knowledge is illegal in Illinois and it is a crime that is taken very seriously. Since the offender must have a lewd or ill intent in order to commit the crime, a possible defense is that there was no lewd intent to the act. It could be that the defendant just happened to look in a window and saw someone, or that it was an accident.

While such a defense may be the truth, it can be difficult to prove intent. Still, an experienced and skilled criminal defense lawyer can help you put your strongest defense forward as you fight your disorderly conduct charges.

Are You Facing Disorderly Conduct Charges?

If you have been arrested for disorderly conduct, such as peeping on another through a window or some other opening to a dwelling, it is important that you get into touch with an experienced Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer as soon as possible. You could be facing a misdemeanor if you are convicted.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs4.asp?ActID=1876&ChapterID=53&SeqStart=73600000&SeqEnd=74600000

Crying Wolf Can Be Grounds For Disorderly Conduct in Illinois

September 13th, 2016 at 2:48 pm

Crying Wolf Can Be Grounds For Disorderly Conduct in IllinoisEveryone has heard the story of the little boy who cried wolf. Repeatedly the little boy made false assertions that a wolf was nearby, alarming everyone else in the town. But in truth, there was no wolf. Finally, others stopped believing the boy, and when the boy saw a wolf that posed a real threat to those in the town, no one would heed his warnings because he had developed a reputation as a liar. The moral of this children’s story is that it is not a good idea to report false threats and place groups of people into a state of alarm unnecessarily. A similar premise underlies Illinois disorderly conduct law.

Falsely alerting groups of people of danger is a serious offense in Illinois. When there is no real threat of danger, there is no need to alert others. Alerting others to a false danger can place these people in a state of panic or distress, and can cause them to act in an alarmed way unnecessarily. In effect, false reports of danger put people on edge, and cause them to do things that they might not normally do because they feel like they are in danger, and these false reports of danger can cause disruptions of the peace. Some examples of offenses that can warrant a disorderly conduct charge include:

  • Crying “fire” in a crowded place where there is no real threat of a fire;
  • Reporting to 911 a false call for help, such as calling police to a scene where there is no crime being committed or calling for an ambulance when none is required;
  • Falsely making a report of a bomb or other dangerous explosive; or
  • Making a false report about an abused or neglected child.

Any one of these instances where someone falsely reports a situation or danger, causes dozens of others to be mobilized into action. For instance, if “fire” is shouted in a club, the club patrons will take steps to exit the building, which is unlikely to occur in a safe and considerate fashion since the patrons are likely going to panic. Patrons might get hurt while trying to exit the club, such as being trampled by the crowd or being struck by someone who is panicking. Not only that but if the alleged fire is called into 911, fire trucks will come to the club where there is no real fire, taking these firefighters away from other calls.

It is important to keep the public safe, and that means protecting the public from false reports of danger. That is why Illinois law takes such a firm stance against acts of disorderly conduct. When police, fire, medical services, and child protection services are falsely called to a situation where there is no real threat of harm to anyone, it is a waste of these people’s time and attention.

Contact Us for Professional Representation

If you have been charged with disorderly conduct for falsely reporting a dangerous situation, you should speak with an experienced disorderly defense lawyer as soon as possible. Please do not hesitate to contact a Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney. Our attorneys are eager to assist you today.

Source:
http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=072000050K26-1

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