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Archive for the ‘aggravated battery’ tag

What Are the Penalties for Battery in Illinois?

November 20th, 2017 at 9:32 am

aggravated battery, aggravated domestic battery, battery, domestic battery, penalties for batteryBattery, unlawfully and knowingly causing physical bodily harm to someone else or making physical contact of a provoking or insulting nature with the person of another, is a serious criminal offense in the state of Illinois. Moreover, battery is punished in a variety of different ways—the severity of which depends on the circumstances surrounding the battery and the type of battery with which the offender is charged. 

Battery & Aggravated Battery

Battery as defined in code section 720 ILCS 5/12-3 is a Class A misdemeanor that is punishable by up to one year in prison and a fine of up to $2,500. However, in some instances, those convicted of battery will instead be sentenced to probation rather than imprisonment and be required to attend counseling and/or engage in a set amount of community service.

Additionally, if the offender is convicted of aggravated battery under code section 720 ILCS 5/12-3.05, then he or she can be punished in any of the following ways, depending on the severity of the aggravating factors present:

  • Class 3 felony: Punishable by up to five years in prison and a $25,000 fine;
  • Class 2 felony: Punishable by up to seven years in prison and a $25,000 fine;
  • Class 1 felony: Punishable by up to 15 years in prison and a $25,000 fine; and
  • Class X felony: Punishable by up to 60 years in prison and a $25,000 fine.

Battery of an Unborn Child & Aggravated Battery of an Unborn Child

An offender who knowingly and without legal justification causes physical harm to an unborn child and is convicted of battery of an unborn child in Illinois under code section 720 ILCS 5/12-3.1, is guilty of a Class A misdemeanor, and can be sentenced to serve up to one year in prison and to pay a fine of up to $2,5000.

However, if the offender knowingly caused great bodily harm to the unborn child, then he/ or she can be convicted of aggravated battery of an unborn child, which is a Class 2 felony, and sentenced to serve up seven years in prison and pay up to $25,000 in fines.

Domestic Battery & Aggravated Domestic Battery

Domestic battery occurs in Illinois when an individual knowingly and without legal justification physically harms or makes physical contact of a provoking or offensive nature with a household or family member and is generally classified as a Class A misdemeanor. Domestic battery is punishable by up to one year in prison and a fine of up to $2,500. 720 ILCS 5/12-3.2.

However, domestic battery can constitute a Class 4 felony under some circumstances—for example, if the offender was previously convicted of domestic battery, violating a protective order, or a serious violent crime such as first degree murder, etc.—and is punishable by imprisonment for up to one year. Additionally, aggravated domestic battery in Illinois is a Class 2 felony that is punishable by up to seven years in prison and a fine of up to $25,000.

Charged with Battery? Contact a Local Criminal Defense Lawyer Today

No matter which type of battery you have been charged with in Illinois, it is important that you take the allegations that have been levied against you seriously and consult with a skilled Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer about your legal options without delay. At The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley, we offer a free initial consultation to prospective clients and would be happy to meet with you.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs4.asp?ActID=1876&ChapterID=53&SeqEnd=23000000&SeqStart=21100000

Assault and Battery Law in Illinois

June 28th, 2014 at 6:49 am

battery, Assault & Battery, Chicago criminal defense attorney, Christopher M. Cosley, Cook County criminal defense lawyer, Rolling Meadows, The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley, Class C misdemeanor, assault crime, aggravated assault, Class 4 felony, aggravated batteryAssault and battery are two serious offenses that are treated as such in criminal courts in the state of Illinois. Those charged with such crimes are advised to immediately seek the help of an experienced criminal defense attorney to protect their rights. Below are some of the basics regarding relevant assault and battery laws in Illinois.

Assault

In the state of Illinois, an assault charge is usually graded as a Class C misdemeanor. The penalties associated with such an offense are a maximum of 30 days incarceration and up to $1,500 in fines. Typically, the facts that give rise to such a charge involve engaging in conduct or acting in a way that places another in fear of harm. It is important to note that the crime of assault does not necessarily involve physical contact with the victim; a verbal threat or threat of physical harm is enough to meet the law’s requirements.

Certain circumstances warrant a charge to be elevated to an aggravated assault. This usually happens when a deadly weapon is involved, the defendant is disguised when committing the crime, or the alleged victim is within a certain class of individuals, including but not limited to teachers, law enforcement officials, and firemen. Aggravated assaults are graded as Class A misdemeanors, which carry a maximum one-year jail sentence and a fine of up to $2,500. If the victim falls within the designated class of individuals, the crime becomes a Class 4 felony and carries a maximum three-year prison term and a maximum $25,000 fine.

Battery

Under Illinois law, it is considered battery if a person causes bodily harm to another or makes insulting or provoking contact with another. Pushing someone could be the basis for a battery charge. Because the crime invokes physical harm, it is generally treated more seriously than assault. Battery is graded as a Class A misdemeanor and can invoke a maximum jail term of one year or a fine of up to $2,500.

Aggravated battery is charged when the victim suffers significant bodily harm or permanent disability. The use of a firearm could also support a charge of aggravated battery. This crime is graded as a Class 3 felony and carries a maximum five-year prison term as well as fines that could reach up to $25,000.

Criminal Defense Attorney

Depending on the circumstances, assault or battery charges could have serious consequences for those accused of them. The attorneys at The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley have successfully defended a number of clients charged with assault and battery. Contact us today for a consultation in our Rolling Meadows office. We can listen to the facts of your specific case, advise you of your options, and protect your rights.

Teens Attack and Rob Vietnam Veteran

July 5th, 2012 at 2:24 pm

According to the Chicago Tribune, two Chicago teens are accused of attacking and robbing a South Side 65-year-old man near Stroger Hospital as he was picking up his cousin from a doctor’s appointment. One of the teens allegedly hit Vietnam veteran Willie Haynes in the head, causing him to fall to the ground. The 18-year-old and 17-year-old teens robbed the victim of $100 and fled. Haynes was unconscious for a brief period of time before he was able to regain consciousness and get up. The two teens have been charged with aggravated robbery and aggravated battery to a senior citizen, and the court set bail for each teen at $100,000.

Each of these teenagers face potentially severe penalties for their alleged crimes. For instance, because the victim in this case was a senior citizen, the crime is a felony of a different class than general aggravated battery under Illinois law. As a result, if convicted, the teens may face jail and even prison time, even though one of the teenagers is still a minor. Given the gravity of these charges, a strong defense by an accomplished criminal defense lawyer will be necessary to minimize the negatives consequences that these charges are likely to bring if a conviction occurs for either teenager.

If you or a family member are accused of committing a serious crime such as aggravated robbery, aggravated battery or another type of crime, you should immediately contact an experienced Rolling Meadows lawyer for legal guidance and advice.

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