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Archive for the ‘aggravated battery’ tag

Assault and Battery Defined

March 2nd, 2018 at 1:48 pm

aggravated battery, assault and battery, battery convictions, Class C misdemeanor, Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorneyWhen people hear the term “assault and battery,” they often think of one crime. Assault and battery, however, are two separate crimes under Illinois law. They are related, but still different.

Assault differs from battery in that it is psychological. It usually happens in anticipation of  battery. Assault refers to a threat that can be verbal or physical in nature. For example, if you threaten to kill someone, that can be considered assault. If you swing a bat at someone to scare him or her, but do not make contact,  you can then be accused of assault, but not battery.

Battery involves some form of physical contact. It is a broad term that can mean anything from an unwanted hug to a punch in the face. It can also involve getting hit by an object or getting harmed by a firearm. Determining whether or not an incident should be considered battery can be confusing, though. The actual physical contact must be intentional, but the harmful nature does not have to be. Even poisoning someone’s food or blowing smoke in someone’s face can be considered battery.

Assault and battery do not have to co-exist. There can be assault without battery, and likewise, there can be battery without assault. However, to convict a person of battery, the prosecutor must prove that the person caused bodily harm to the victim or that he or she engaged in provocative or unwanted physical contact.

Assault and Battery Penalties

Under Illinois law, assault is classified as a Class C misdemeanor. The penalties include a fine of $1,500 and 30 days in jail. Community service may also be ordered.

When the assault results in severe bodily injury, disfigurement, disability, or death, the charge is elevated to aggravated assault. This can result in a Class 4 felony, which is punishable by 1-3 years in prison and a $25,000 fine.

Battery is classified as a Class A misdemeanor. It is punishable by a $2,500 fine and one year in prison. Aggravated battery can result in 2-5 years in prison and a $25,000 fine.

Most misdemeanor assault and battery convictions are punished by probation rather than imprisonment. Probation typically is not an option for felony charges, however.

Contact a Local Criminal Defense Lawyer for Assistance

While assault and battery charges are often misdemeanors, you could face felony charges in extreme cases. A felony can result in fines and prison time, and can additionallyaffect you for the rest of your life.

If you are facing assault and battery charges, seek legal help right away. The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley can defend your case. Skilled Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney Christopher Cosley will do what it takes to help you avoid a conviction.


Home Invasion: An Illinois Crime Commonly Charged in Connection With Burglary

December 19th, 2017 at 9:02 am

burglary, home invasion, Illinois crime, residential burglary, aggravated batteryEarlier this month, a 56-year-old man was sentenced by Illinois Judge Thomas Berglund to serve 30 years in prison in connection with a home invasion that the offender confessed to committing earlier this year, reports The Register-Mail.

Reportedly, the homes invasion took place last spring when the offender entered the home of an 83-year-old man and hit the resident over the head with a metal desk lamp. The elderly victim suffered great bodily harm and was discovered by a neighbor two days after the incident occurred.

After admitting that this was in fact the course of events that took place, a negotiated plea agreement was reached in which two other charges (residential burglary and aggravated battery causing harm to someone over 60 years of age) were dismissed and the prosecution continued ahead with the home invasion charge for which the offender is now serving time.

The Crime of Home Invasion Under Illinois Law

Home invasion is a criminal offense that often goes hand in hand with burglary in Illinois. Under Illinois law, a burglary is committed when an individual remains in or enters a building or a vehicle which he or she does not have permission to enter or remain in with the intent to commit theft or a felony therein. However, if a burglar enters a dwelling and causes injury or threatens the use of force against someone therein, then he or she may have also committed the crime of home invasion.

Under section 720 ILCS 5/19-6 of the Illinois Compiled Statutes, the crime of home invasion is committed when a person (who is not a police officer doing their job) knowingly and without the authority to do so enters or remains in the dwelling of another while knowing, or having reason to know, that someone is in the dwelling and:

  • Has a dangerous weapon (that is not a firearm) that they use or threaten to against any person(s) present in the dwelling,
  • Intentionally injures any person(s) present in the dwelling,
  • Is armed with a firearm, uses or threatens force upon any person(s) present in the dwelling,
  • Uses or threatens to use force upon any person(s) present in the dwelling while personally discharging a firearm,
  • Personally discharges a firearm that causes permanent disability, great bodily harm, permanent disfigurement, or death to someone within the dwelling, or
  • Commits criminal sexual assault or criminal sexual abuse against any person(s) present in the dwelling.

However, it should be noted that under Illinois law anyone charged with the crime of home invasion has an affirmative defense if he or she immediately surrendered or left the premises upon realizing that one or more people were present in the dwelling that the alleged offender unlawfully entered or remained in.

Let Us Help You with Your Case

If you have been charged with home invasion in Illinois be sure to contact the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley today. Under Illinois law home invasion is an extremely serious offense. In fact, home invasion is a Class X felony that carries a mandatory minimum prison sentence of 6 to 30 years. To discuss your legal options with an experienced Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer, contact our office today.


What Are the Penalties for Battery in Illinois?

November 20th, 2017 at 9:32 am

aggravated battery, aggravated domestic battery, battery, domestic battery, penalties for batteryBattery, unlawfully and knowingly causing physical bodily harm to someone else or making physical contact of a provoking or insulting nature with the person of another, is a serious criminal offense in the state of Illinois. Moreover, battery is punished in a variety of different ways—the severity of which depends on the circumstances surrounding the battery and the type of battery with which the offender is charged. 

Battery & Aggravated Battery

Battery as defined in code section 720 ILCS 5/12-3 is a Class A misdemeanor that is punishable by up to one year in prison and a fine of up to $2,500. However, in some instances, those convicted of battery will instead be sentenced to probation rather than imprisonment and be required to attend counseling and/or engage in a set amount of community service.

Additionally, if the offender is convicted of aggravated battery under code section 720 ILCS 5/12-3.05, then he or she can be punished in any of the following ways, depending on the severity of the aggravating factors present:

  • Class 3 felony: Punishable by up to five years in prison and a $25,000 fine;
  • Class 2 felony: Punishable by up to seven years in prison and a $25,000 fine;
  • Class 1 felony: Punishable by up to 15 years in prison and a $25,000 fine; and
  • Class X felony: Punishable by up to 60 years in prison and a $25,000 fine.

Battery of an Unborn Child & Aggravated Battery of an Unborn Child

An offender who knowingly and without legal justification causes physical harm to an unborn child and is convicted of battery of an unborn child in Illinois under code section 720 ILCS 5/12-3.1, is guilty of a Class A misdemeanor, and can be sentenced to serve up to one year in prison and to pay a fine of up to $2,5000.

However, if the offender knowingly caused great bodily harm to the unborn child, then he/ or she can be convicted of aggravated battery of an unborn child, which is a Class 2 felony, and sentenced to serve up seven years in prison and pay up to $25,000 in fines.

Domestic Battery & Aggravated Domestic Battery

Domestic battery occurs in Illinois when an individual knowingly and without legal justification physically harms or makes physical contact of a provoking or offensive nature with a household or family member and is generally classified as a Class A misdemeanor. Domestic battery is punishable by up to one year in prison and a fine of up to $2,500. 720 ILCS 5/12-3.2.

However, domestic battery can constitute a Class 4 felony under some circumstances—for example, if the offender was previously convicted of domestic battery, violating a protective order, or a serious violent crime such as first degree murder, etc.—and is punishable by imprisonment for up to one year. Additionally, aggravated domestic battery in Illinois is a Class 2 felony that is punishable by up to seven years in prison and a fine of up to $25,000.

Charged with Battery? Contact a Local Criminal Defense Lawyer Today

No matter which type of battery you have been charged with in Illinois, it is important that you take the allegations that have been levied against you seriously and consult with a skilled Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer about your legal options without delay. At The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley, we offer a free initial consultation to prospective clients and would be happy to meet with you.


Assault and Battery Law in Illinois

June 28th, 2014 at 6:49 am

battery, Assault & Battery, Chicago criminal defense attorney, Christopher M. Cosley, Cook County criminal defense lawyer, Rolling Meadows, The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley, Class C misdemeanor, assault crime, aggravated assault, Class 4 felony, aggravated batteryAssault and battery are two serious offenses that are treated as such in criminal courts in the state of Illinois. Those charged with such crimes are advised to immediately seek the help of an experienced criminal defense attorney to protect their rights. Below are some of the basics regarding relevant assault and battery laws in Illinois.


In the state of Illinois, an assault charge is usually graded as a Class C misdemeanor. The penalties associated with such an offense are a maximum of 30 days incarceration and up to $1,500 in fines. Typically, the facts that give rise to such a charge involve engaging in conduct or acting in a way that places another in fear of harm. It is important to note that the crime of assault does not necessarily involve physical contact with the victim; a verbal threat or threat of physical harm is enough to meet the law’s requirements.

Certain circumstances warrant a charge to be elevated to an aggravated assault. This usually happens when a deadly weapon is involved, the defendant is disguised when committing the crime, or the alleged victim is within a certain class of individuals, including but not limited to teachers, law enforcement officials, and firemen. Aggravated assaults are graded as Class A misdemeanors, which carry a maximum one-year jail sentence and a fine of up to $2,500. If the victim falls within the designated class of individuals, the crime becomes a Class 4 felony and carries a maximum three-year prison term and a maximum $25,000 fine.


Under Illinois law, it is considered battery if a person causes bodily harm to another or makes insulting or provoking contact with another. Pushing someone could be the basis for a battery charge. Because the crime invokes physical harm, it is generally treated more seriously than assault. Battery is graded as a Class A misdemeanor and can invoke a maximum jail term of one year or a fine of up to $2,500.

Aggravated battery is charged when the victim suffers significant bodily harm or permanent disability. The use of a firearm could also support a charge of aggravated battery. This crime is graded as a Class 3 felony and carries a maximum five-year prison term as well as fines that could reach up to $25,000.

Criminal Defense Attorney

Depending on the circumstances, assault or battery charges could have serious consequences for those accused of them. The attorneys at The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley have successfully defended a number of clients charged with assault and battery. Contact us today for a consultation in our Rolling Meadows office. We can listen to the facts of your specific case, advise you of your options, and protect your rights.

Teens Attack and Rob Vietnam Veteran

July 5th, 2012 at 2:24 pm

According to the Chicago Tribune, two Chicago teens are accused of attacking and robbing a South Side 65-year-old man near Stroger Hospital as he was picking up his cousin from a doctor’s appointment. One of the teens allegedly hit Vietnam veteran Willie Haynes in the head, causing him to fall to the ground. The 18-year-old and 17-year-old teens robbed the victim of $100 and fled. Haynes was unconscious for a brief period of time before he was able to regain consciousness and get up. The two teens have been charged with aggravated robbery and aggravated battery to a senior citizen, and the court set bail for each teen at $100,000.

Each of these teenagers face potentially severe penalties for their alleged crimes. For instance, because the victim in this case was a senior citizen, the crime is a felony of a different class than general aggravated battery under Illinois law. As a result, if convicted, the teens may face jail and even prison time, even though one of the teenagers is still a minor. Given the gravity of these charges, a strong defense by an accomplished criminal defense lawyer will be necessary to minimize the negatives consequences that these charges are likely to bring if a conviction occurs for either teenager.

If you or a family member are accused of committing a serious crime such as aggravated robbery, aggravated battery or another type of crime, you should immediately contact an experienced Rolling Meadows lawyer for legal guidance and advice.

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