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When is Trespassing a Crime?

May 15th, 2017 at 9:04 am

trespassing, Rolling Meadows Criminal Defense LawyerAs a youth , sneaking into a movie theater or a pool after hours may seem like good fun; however, making a choice such as this can turn into a criminal trespassing arrest or conviction.

Illinois law sets out what kind of activity is considered criminally liable trespassing. Those elements include but are not limited to the following:

  • A person knowingly, without lawful authority, enters or remains within or on a building;
  • A person enters land owned by another, and the owner gave notice that entry was forbidden;
  • A person remains upon the land of another after receiving notice that entry was forbidden;
  • A person falsely gains access to premises for which general public entry is forbidden; and
  • A person intentionally removes notice that entry is forbidden.

What Are the Penalties for Criminal Trespassing?

This is a question for your Rolling Meadows, Cook County criminal trespassing defense attorney. The penalties will vary depending on the circumstances of each crime. Generally, criminal trespassing in Illinois is a misdemeanor. Therefore, a conviction will likely encompass a fine; however, it can also land you in jail for up to a year. There are different categories of criminal trespassing, and include:

  • Criminal trespass to vehicles;
  • Criminal trespass to real property;
  • Criminal trespass to state supported land;
  • Criminal trespass to restricted areas;
  • Criminal trespass to a nuclear facility; and
  • Criminal trespass to a place of public amusement.

Each variation of trespassing can give you a varying penalty, or be used in conjunction with another crime which can also affect the sentence handed down. It is important that you speak with a knowledgeable Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney about the potential repercussions you may face as well as map out a strategy for your defense.

What Defenses Are Available?

The type of trespassing you are charged with will drive the defenses that you have available to you. For example, a common defense to the trespass of land is arguing that there was not sufficient notice to forbid entrance. It may also be argued that the land you were trespassing on was open to the public and therefore you did not break the law by being present on it. Ignorance of the law or mistake of fact are typically not defenses to trespass.

Been Arrested for Trespassing?

If you or a loved one has been charged with a trespassing crime, then it is crucial that you get the dedicated and insightful representation you deserve. Attorney Christopher M. Cosley has nearly two decades of standing up for his clients rights and providing criminal defense every step of the way for his clients. Contact our skilled Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer at 847-394-3200, 24 hours a day, to schedule your consultation. Do not face these charges alone.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=072000050K21-3

Is it Burglary, Theft, or Robbery?

May 10th, 2017 at 8:54 am

burglary, theft, robbery, Rolling Meadows Criminal Defense LawyerBurglary, theft, and robbery are serious crimes, and each one has distinctive characteristics. Illinois law is very specific in how it defines these crimes and it takes a knowledgeable Rolling Meadows defense lawyer to explain how the laws differ and what the difference means moving forward in your case.

  • Burglary is defined by Illinois law as entering the property of another, knowingly, and without permission, and with the intent to commit a theft or a felony once inside the property.  It is a common misconception that the property needs to be a home. Boats, cars, railroad cars, even airplanes can be burglarized.
  • Theft, as defined by Illinois law, is the unlawful or unauthorized taking of property from another person with the intent to permanently deprive that person of the property.
  • Robbery is the most serious of these three offenses and generally carries the most severe punishments. The reason for that is the violent nature of the offense. Robbery is basically theft accomplished through the use of force, or the fear of force.

Can a Theft Turn into a Robbery?

This is a question you will want to ask your experienced cook county criminal defense lawyer. Generally, the short answer is yes. Theft can turn into robbery the moment the victim is physically harmed or is put in fear of harm. A common example is a purse snatching incident. If a woman sets her purse down on a table and someone whisks by and takes it, a theft has occurred. However, if that person snatches the purse off of the same woman’s arm, it is likely to be charged as a robbery.

Does a Theft Have to Occur for a Burglary Charge?

The short answer is no. A burglary can occur without the actual theft of property. While most burglaries that are committed involve a theft of some sort, it does not have to happen in order for burglary to have happened in the eyes of the law. For example, if someone breaks into his or her neighbor’s home, sneaks in the kitchen, and makes pot brownies, among other crimes they have also committed a burglary.

Facing Criminal Charges?

If you have been arrested and charged with a crime, the first step you should take is to contact your experienced Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer. Attorney Christopher M. Cosley has years of experience defending his clients rights when they have been charged with crimes. The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley is equipped with the resources necessary to minimize the damage of any criminal conviction and ensure that your rights guaranteed by the constitution are honored by the prosecution. Contact our Rolling Meadows office at 847-394-3200, 24 hours a day, to speak with our dedicated and relentless criminal defense lawyer.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs4.asp?ActID=1876&ChapterID=53&SeqStart=62600000&SeqEnd=63400000

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=072000050K16-1

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs4.asp?ActID=1876&ChapterID=53&SeqStart=61900000&SeqEnd=62600000

New Traffic Laws 2017

May 8th, 2017 at 10:09 am

traffic laws 2017, Rolling Meadows Criminal Defense LawyerThere are a number of changes to the traffic laws in Illinois—changes of which to be aware because, unfortunately, ignorance of the law is not a defense. The laws encompass areas including:

  • When you are required to switch lanes or reduce your speed;
  • The distance you have to come to a complete stop in front of a railroad crossing;
  • The kind of lights a motorcycle can display for their rear stop lamps; and
  • Penalties resulting from a conviction for driving without insurance.

The laws take effect this year in 2017, and some have already been implemented and applied. Traffic violations may seem minor; however, violations can carry hefty consequences for an unsuspecting motorist. Moreover, traffic violations can result in the loss or suspension of a license and increased insurance rates. Additionally, depending on the severity, traffic violations can even result in jail time.

Changing Lanes and Decreasing Speed

For a long time it has been a law that when an emergency vehicle approaches drivers with its lights on, drivers are required to changed lanes and pull over to allow the vehicle to pass. HB 6006 now demands that, whenever possible, drivers change lanes when approaching any disabled vehicle on the road with hazard lights flashing. Also, when it is not possible to change lanes, drivers must decrease their speed.

Distance You Have to Stop Before a Railroad Crossing

SB 2806 is a new law that changes the distance you have to stop before approaching a railroad crossing where there is a posted stop sign. As of January 2017, any motorist who fails to stop within 50 feet from the nearest rail will be guilty of a petty offense with a $500 fine, up from the $250 fine it used to be for a first offense. For a second offense the fine is $1000.

Changes to Traffic Laws Involving Motorcycles

HB 4105 now allows for motorcycles to be equipped with blue lights on the rear of the motorcycle in conjunction with the motorcycle’s rear stop lamp. The blue lights increase visibility from longer distances and thus increases motorcycle safety during night time operation.

Penalties for Driving Without Proof of Insurance

Any vehicle that you operate must be insured—being pulled over without proof of insurance can prove costly. However, HB 5723 aims to ease the burden for those unlucky enough to not have proof of insurance at the time they are stopped. It is now a petty offense for first time offenders who are pulled over and do not have proof of insurance. Again, this only applies to first time offenders.

How to Avoid a Traffic Violation

If you find yourself a defendant in a traffic violation matter, speak with the skilled Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney at The Law Office of Christopher M. Cosley. Call 847-394-3200 to schedule your consultation today.

Sources:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/BillStatus.asp?DocTypeID=HB&DocNum=6006&GAID=13&SessionID=88&LegID=95513

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/billstatus.asp?DocNum=2806&GAID=13&GA=99&DocTypeID=SB&LegID=96116&SessionID=88

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/BillStatus.asp?DocTypeID=HB&DocNum=4105&GAID=13&SessionID=88&LegID=90325

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/BillStatus.asp?DocTypeID=HB&DocNum=5723&GAID=13&SessionID=88&LegID=95177

 

Accused of Burglarizing a Store? Get a Criminal Defense Lawyer

May 3rd, 2017 at 8:10 am

burglarizing a store, Rolling Meadows Criminal Defense LawyerBurglary in Illinois involves someone knowingly entering a building without permission, and with the intent to commit a theft or a felony. One of the most common targets for acts of burglary are stores and shops.

From large retailers to small mom-and-pop type stores, virtually any type of store can be the target of a burglary or an attempted burglary. The main reason why a person commits a burglary of a store is usually to steal some piece of merchandise or to steal money. But what is interesting about the crime of burglary is that a burglar does not actually have to steal anything in order to commit the crime. Simply breaking into the store with the intent to steal something is enough to warrant a conviction for burglary.

Burglary is a Different Charge Than Theft or Shoplifting

Burglary is often charged when a person breaks into a store with the intent to steal something when the store is normally closed. Burglary could also be charged if a person remains in an open store after being asked to leave, or remains in a store in an off-limits area—in either case while having the intent to steal or commit a felony. Still, burglary is a different offense than theft or shoplifting.  

As a general rule, someone who is charged with burglary is not also charged with shoplifting, even if the person steals something during the burglary. Rather, he or she may be charged with burglary and theft, but each situation is unique and the exact charges will depend on the circumstances of the offense.

Shoplifting, on the other hand, is charged when someone steals merchandise from a store, alters the price of the item, or attempts to buy an item for less than its ticket price due to some sort of trickery (e.g., price tag swapping, or trying to trick the self-checkout scanner at the store). Shoplifting is usually associated with theft that occurs during normal business hours of the store’s operation.

Why You Need to Fight Your Criminal Charges

Whether you are facing burglary, theft, of shoplifting charges, it is important that you fight your criminal charges. If you are convicted of burglary, it is a Class 2 felony. If you are convicted of theft, it can be either a misdemeanor or a felony level offense. Similarly, depending on the circumstances surrounding the shoplifting, you could be convicted of a misdemeanor or a felony level offense.

A conviction will leave you with a criminal record, which can follow you around for many years, making it difficult to get some forms of employment or to rent an apartment. Hiring a criminal defense lawyer to fight for you will give you your best chance of defending yourself against the charges.

If you did commit the crime, then it is important to try and get the charges reduced, or dropped, and you will want to have a lawyer on your side to make sure that you receive fair treatment under the law.

Contact an Experienced Criminal Defense Lawyer

Burglary, theft, and shoplifting charges are nothing to be taken lightly. You need the help of an experienced and talented criminal defense lawyer with years of experience to fight the charges that are pending against you. Contact a passionate Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney at our office for assistance with your case.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs4.asp?ActID=1876&ChapterID=53&SeqStart=62600000&SeqEnd=63400000

Burglary of a Vehicle: Is it Considered a Break in if the Car Was Unlocked?

May 1st, 2017 at 8:20 am

burglary of a vehicle, Rolling Meadows Criminal Defense LawyerIt is not unheard of for people to get arrested for breaking into unlocked vehicles in Illinois. In these situations, the individual involved can be charged with a number of different criminal offenses based on the circumstances surrounding their activities.

Anyone who has been arrested and charged with a crime for entering an unlocked vehicle without the owner’s permission needs to consult with an experienced criminal defense lawyer immediately. Your rights are in jeopardy and you need to take steps promptly to protect yourself.

Burglary of a Vehicle

One of the crimes that people who enter an unlocked vehicle without the owner’s permission often face is burglary of a vehicle. When a person knowingly enters a vehicle that he or she does not have permission to enter, and the perpetrator does so with the intent to commit a felony or a theft, it can constitute the offense of burglary of a vehicle. Many times, a vehicle is broken into in order to steal something valuable inside. Sunglasses, music players, cell phones, cash, and airbags are all common items that are stolen from unlocked vehicles. Burglary of a vehicle is a felony.

Regardless of the fact that the vehicle may have been unlocked, if you entered the vehicle without the owner’s permission and removed something from the vehicle with no intention of giving the removed item back to its rightful owner, you will likely face criminal charges of burglary of a vehicle.

  • You could have viable defenses that you could bring up at trial. For instance, perhaps you had permission or believed you had permission from the owner of the vehicle to enter the unlocked vehicle.
  • Perhaps you accidentally opened the vehicle and got inside because it was the same make and model as your own vehicle and you were mistaken that the vehicle was in fact not your own.
  • Maybe you had no intention to commit a felony or to steal anything when you entered the unlocked vehicle belonging to someone else.

You should discuss the facts of your particular situation with your lawyer to determine what defenses you may have available to you.

Criminal Trespass to a Motor Vehicle

You could also be charged with criminal trespass to a motor vehicle. Criminal trespass of a motor vehicle occurs when someone knowingly enters or operates a vehicle belonging to another without permission. It is a misdemeanor offense.

It is not uncommon for criminal defendants to adopt a defense strategy of getting their charges dismissed or reduced to a lesser offense. For someone who is charged with burglary of a motor vehicle, it might be a good strategy to try and get the charges reduced to criminal trespass to a motor vehicle instead. Your specific circumstances should be discussed with your criminal defense lawyer.

Contact an Experienced Criminal Defense Lawyer

You could be charged with a crime if you enter a vehicle without the owner’s permission, even if the vehicle was left unlocked. If you are facing criminal charges for breaking into an unlocked vehicle, you need to consult with an experienced Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer today.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=072000050K21-2

When Juveniles Commit a Theft That Turns Into Residential Burglary

April 28th, 2017 at 1:42 pm

residential burglary, Rolling Meadows Juvenile Crime LawyerAs the weather begins to warm up, many homeowners in the area will open their doors and garages to allow the sunshine in and to air out their homes after a long, cold winter. In suburbia, it is not uncommon for people to leave their garage doors open during the daytime, and to even leave them open without supervision.

While normally such behavior should be safe, open doors can be inviting, especially to juveniles. Take, for example, a group of teenagers who see an open and apparently unguarded garage and enter in search for beer. One teen in the group might dare another to go steal the beer or something else from the open garage. Under pressure from his or her friends, the unfortunate teen will enter the garage and commit the theft.

When Theft Turns Into Residential Burglary

The teen who steals the beer from the garage, however, has done more than merely commit a theft. Because the teen entered the garage of another without permission, and with the intent to steal the beer, the criminal charges the teen can face will likely be upgraded to residential burglary. Why is the upcharge so bad for a teen? Residential burglary is a felony level offense, even if the offender is only a juvenile.

While someone who is under 18 years of age will likely face juvenile charges for his or her theft of the beer from someone’s garage, it is still a serious matter. When it comes to juveniles who commit offenses, the courts have a lot of discretion in terms of how the juvenile offender should be punished. The potential punishments that a convicted juvenile delinquent could face include:

  • Having to pay a fine;
  • Having to pay restitutions to the victim of the residential burglary;
  • Having to attend mandatory counseling sessions or therapy sessions;
  • Being put on probation, which means that the juvenile avoids detention (the juvenile equivalent of jail), but is required to comply with a number of terms, i.e., rules, that are part of his or her probation;
  • Being placed in juvenile detention, weekend detentions, or mandatory community service-type work programs.

Juveniles sometimes make poor decisions and exercise bad judgement. They also can make mistakes about the criminality of the things they do. First time juvenile delinquents are often treated with more leniency by the court than repeat offenders. Any young person facing theft of burglary charges needs to consult with a juvenile offenses lawyer immediately.

Juvenile Delinquents Need an Experienced Criminal Defense Lawyer

A juvenile charged with a crime needs a strong criminal defense lawyer fighting for his or her rights. Contact an experienced Rolling Meadows juvenile crime lawyer for assistance with your case.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=072000050K19-3

Strangling is Aggravated Domestic Battery in Illinois

April 24th, 2017 at 7:00 am

strangling-Rolling Meadows Domestic Violence Defense Lawyer Many people live in some sort of domestic relationship at home. You might live with a significant other or even with a family member. Of course, sometimes tensions can rise between people who live together or lived together in a domestic relationship, and things can get out of hand.

When one person physically hits or strikes the other, it can constitute domestic battery, which is a crime in Illinois. When actions escalate and the violence is extreme, or strangling is involved, the battery is considered aggravated domestic battery.

What is Domestic Battery in Illinois?

In Illinois, domestic battery is defined as when an individual causes bodily harm or makes physical contact of an insulting or provoking nature against a family member or household member without legal justification to do so. Physically hitting, biting, violently threatening, etc. are all acts of violence. When you commit these acts against a family member or a household member, you could face domestic battery criminal charges. A first time offense is a Class A misdemeanor, while a second or repeat offense (after a domestic violence conviction) can be a Class 4 felony.

There is a second tier for domestic battery, referred to as aggravated domestic battery, which covers physically harmful conduct that is committed against a family or household member that is more severe than simple domestic battery.

What is Aggravated Domestic Battery in Illinois?

When the physical violence committed against a family or household member is more serious, then you can be charged with aggravated domestic battery. Specifically, engaging in physical contact with a household or family member with full knowledge that your physical contact will cause great bodily harm, disfigurement, or permanent disability is aggravated domestic battery.

Similarly, strangling a household or family member also constitutes aggravated domestic battery. Strangling involves deliberately impeding the normal breathing of the victim and/or preventing circulation of blood to the brain of the victim by applying pressure to the neck or throat of the victim. It does not matter if the act of strangling was for just a second or for several seconds. Moreover, even just one instance of strangling can be enough to support a conviction. Aggravated domestic battery is a Class 2 felony.

Domestic battery allegations are fairly common in Illinois, and when someone is falsely accused of domestic battery it can be problematic for the individual who stands accused. An angry ex or your current significant other, roommate, or family member might lodge false or exaggerated allegations to the authorities that you engaged in domestic violence against them. It is unfair when these things happen and if you are charged with domestic battery in Illinois, you need to contact an experienced criminal defense lawyer immediately.

Get a Criminal Defense Lawyer on Your Side Now

Please contact a passionate Rolling Meadows domestic violence defense lawyer as soon as you can if you are facing domestic battery or aggravated domestic battery criminal charges. We can help craft a solid defense in your case.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=072000050K12-3.2

A Drug Crime Conviction Could Lead to You Being Deported

April 21st, 2017 at 9:30 am

drug crime conviction, Rolling Meadows Drug Crimes Defense LawyerMany people who live in Rolling Meadows and the surrounding communities do not have United States citizenship. These individuals are living in the U.S. on a visa or as a permanent resident, or because they hold a green card. Immigrants who are in the United States legally, or even illegally, and find themselves in trouble with the law over drug offenses could face deportation or removal from the country if they are convicted.

Non-U.S. citizens who are deported are often prevented from reentering the country again for many years after their deportation. Often times, non-U.S. citizens who are convicted for drug crimes involving controlled substances or methamphetamines are more likely to be deported or removed from the country than someone who is convicted for marijuana possession based on small quantities of marijuana. The harder and more addictive the drug that is involved in the crime, the more serious the consequences may be upon conviction.

The Challenges of Deportation

When a non-U.S. citizen (also known as a foreign national or a legal alien) is convicted for a drug crime in Illinois, deportation from the United States is often one of the most serious consequences for his or her criminal activity. Deportation back to a native country can be a big problem for someone who is convicted for a drug crime, especially if he or she does not know anyone in his or her native country, has no family connections in his or her native country, or does not speak his or her native country’s language. Not only that, but it is very likely that the immigrant has built a life in the United States. He or she most likely has family, friends, a job, and a life here in Illinois and he or she could lose it all if convicted with drug charges.

Fight Your Drug Charges to Avoid Deportation

The best way to avoid being deported is to not be convicted on your drug charges. If you are not convicted, then the federal government does not have grounds to force your deportation or removal from the country. Getting the drug charges against you dropped or dismissed is your best bet.

By working with an experienced drug crimes defense lawyer, you will give yourself your best shot at success for beating your charges. An experienced criminal defense lawyer will review the facts of your case and your arrest and will identify each possible grounds for defense. Together, you and your lawyer will decide on a defense strategy.

Reach Out to Us for Help

More often than not, first time offenders who are convicted of minor drug offenses often avoid being deported. However, there is no guarantee that you will not be deported if you are convicted of a drug related offense in Illinois. Drug charges need to be taken seriously, and especially so if you are not a U.S. citizen. Please do not hesitate to contact a passionate Rolling Meadows drug crimes defense attorney immediately for assistance with your case.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs5.asp?ActID=1941&ChapterID=53

Facing Life in Jail for a Drug Crime

April 17th, 2017 at 9:16 am

drug crime, Rolling Meadows Criminal AttorneyWhen many people think about drug charges, they incorrectly assume that a conviction is not a serious matter. For instance, most minor marijuana-related offenses are only punishable by a civil fine, and most low-level drug offenses are misdemeanors. With the stakes so low, people are often not worried if they get caught by the police. However, it is possible for you to go away to jail for life over a drug offense, which is not something that should be taken lightly.

Circumstances Where You Could Face Life in Prison for a Drug Conviction

There are several circumstances when it comes to drug-related crimes that could land you in jail for the rest of your life if you are convicted. Not only could you be facing state drug laws, but you could also be facing federal drug laws, which are often more strict and carry tougher penalties.

Being Caught in Possession of Large Amounts of Cocaine

If you are caught with more than 100 grams of cocaine in your possession, even if you are a first time drug offender, then you could be sentenced to the rest of your life in jail (you could be sentenced from anywhere between 30 to 50 years in jail, which reasonably could be the rest of your lifetime). What seems patently unfair about being sent to jail for the rest of your life over a drug possession charge is that typically no one gets hurt during the commission of a drug possession crime.

Conversely, if you are caught by Illinois law enforcement with a large quantity of a cocaine mixture in your possession, and someone has died or suffered serious bodily injury as a result of your drug activities, you could face up to life in prison.

Caught Trafficking a Large Quantity of a Drug

Under federal drug laws, you can be sentenced to life behind bars if you are caught trafficking a large quantity of any of the following:

  • Cocaine mixture (500 or more grams);
  • Cocaine base (28 or more grams);
  • Fentanyl (40 or more grams);
  • Fentanyl analogue (10 grams or more);
  • Heroin (100 grams or more);
  • LSD (1 gram or more);
  • Methamphetamine (5 grams or more of pure methamphetamine, or 50 or more grams of a methamphetamine mixture); and
  • PCP (10 grams or more of pure PCP, or 100 or more grams of a PCP mixture).

Discharged Firearm Causes Death or Injury During a Drug Crime

If you are responsible for using and discharging a firearm during the commission of a drug-related offense, and someone is injured or killed as a result, you can be punished for your crimes by being given a sentence of life behind bars.

Drug Charges Are Serious. Call Us

If you are arrested for drug offenses, depending on what you allegedly did, you may face charges under state and federal law. You will need help fighting the drug charges that are levied against you. Make sure to contact a skilled Rolling Meadows criminal attorney for assistance.

Source:

https://www.dea.gov/druginfo/ftp3.shtml

Illinois Marijuana DUI Law: What Happens If I Am Charged?

April 14th, 2017 at 7:00 am

marijuana DUI law, Rolling Meadows DUI lawyerOperating a vehicle under the influence of any drug or combination of drugs is illegal in Illinois. Even though medical marijuana is legal with a valid medical card in Illinois, the state previously had a zero-tolerance policy regarding the presence of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in one’s system.

Governor Rauner signed SB 2228 into law which made changes to the Illinois DUI statute. Instead of investigating whether there are trace amounts of THC in a defendant’s blood, this new law creates a tiered system for impairment.

The new law dictates that it is now illegal to drive or be in actual control of a vehicle with more than 5ng of THC per ml of a person’s blood or bodily substance. Officials have determined this level is close in proximity to the .08 blood alcohol content (BAC) level for driving under the influence.

While this change in the law leaves some uncertainty in the community, it corrected a legal paradox where a person could be charged with a DUI for cannabis that he or she may have smoked or consumed over a month prior. 

I Have My Medical Marijuana Card

Illinois is an implied consent state, which means that when you applied for a medical marijuana card and were approved, you thus automatically consented to a field sobriety test. If a driver with a medical marijuana card refuses a field sobriety test after being pulled for reckless driving, he or she may have his or her license suspended or revoked.  If the arresting officer suspects that the reason for the reckless driving was the medical marijuana, the officer may testify at trial as to the defendant’s appearance of impairment.

Are the Penalties the Same?

If you are arrested for an offense while being legally impaired by THC and driving a vehicle, Illinois traffic laws apply. For example, a reckless driving citation is not less reckless even though the THC that caused the reckless driving was legal under Illinois state law for medicinal purposes. The penalties for driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol vary depending on the circumstances surrounding each case. Most DUI penalties carry hefty fines and usually involve the suspension of one’s license. After a DUI arrest, a driver’s license is automatically suspended for 180 days.

I Have Been Arrested for a DUI. What is My First Step?

A DUI arrest for drugs or alcohol is a serious charge that no one should face alone. Contact an experienced Rolling Meadows DUI lawyer at the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley at 847-394-3200.  Take advantage of our 24-hour answering service.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/99/SB/09900SB2228enr.htm

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