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Archive for the ‘Traffic Offenses’ Category

The Consequences of Speeding in a Construction Zone

February 23rd, 2018 at 8:22 am

Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney, speeding, traffic offenses, construction zone speeding, traffic violationsSpeeding in any area is an offense punishable by hefty fines. This is especially true in construction zones. Workers are in these areas performing road maintenance and it is important to slow down and watch for them. Plus, heavy equipment is often in use and these vehicles can cause serious damage to you and your vehicle.

Statistics show, however, the motorists are more likely to be injured or killed in construction zone accidents than workers. Between 2010 and 2014, there were an average of 27 fatalities each year. Only an average of  two of those involved workers.

Traffic violations in construction zones are no laughing matter. While most violations involve speeding, using your cell phone, or failing to yield can also get you a ticket. The speed limit in a construction zone is 45 mph. If you are given a ticket for exceeding this speed limit, you will face a $375 fine and be ordered to appear in court. The penalties get much steeper on subsequent offenses. If you are caught a second time, the fine goes up to $1,000 and you will have your license suspended for 90 days.

If you pay the ticket, you will be convicted of the crime. The conviction will go on your driving record. You will be assessed points, which will make your car insurance premiums go up. If you have too many points on your driving record, your license could be suspended.

As you can see, something as simple as going too fast in a construction zone can wreak havoc on your driving record, and your wallet. That is why it’s important to know the laws and find out what you can do if you are given a ticket.

What the Law Says

Under Illinois Law 625 ILCS 5/11-605.1, a motorist may not exceed the speed limit in a construction zone (45 mph), whether or not workers are present. Electronic speed-detecting devices may be used in construction zones.

Construction zones are defined as areas in which a government agency has posted signage advising motorists that they are approaching a construction or maintenance speed zone and that a special speed limit sign must be posted because the preexisting established speed limit is considered unsafe. The signs must be of a pre-approved design, but no flashing lights are required. The signs must adequately warn drivers that they are approaching a construction zone. They must also indicate the maximum speed limit as well as the amount of the minimum fine if the speed limit is violated.

Contact Us Today for Help

Sometimes motorists are not aware of speed limits in special areas. Maybe a construction zone is not properly marked. Perhaps no workers were present and the driver assumed that the speed limit did not apply.

Speed limit laws can be confusing. If you have received a ticket for speeding in a construction zone, The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley can help. Passionate Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney Christopher Cosley can help provide an effective defense. Reach out to us today for more information.


Aggravated Speeding: What You Need to Know

February 12th, 2018 at 9:21 am

aggravated speeding, aggravated speeding conviction, Illinois traffic offenses, speeding charges, Class A misdemeanorMany people drive a little fast every now and then. For instance, the car in front of you may be going too fast and you simply keep up with the flow of traffic. Or, perhaps you are running late for work and you need to speed up to get there on time. Perhaps you have a sports car and enjoy going fast.

Drivers can be pulled over for going 10, 15 and 20 mph over the speed limit. In these cases, the only punishment is a speeding ticket. You will have to pay the fine as well as take traffic school if you want to avoid insurance premium increases.

However, if you are caught going 26 mph or more above the speed limit, you will face hefty penalties. Going a few miles above the speed limit is one thing, but driving at an excessive speed is considered reckless. This is called aggravated speeding.

What is Aggravated Speeding?

Under 625 ILCS 5/11-601.5, aggravated speeding occurs when a person drives a vehicle at a speed that exceeds the speed limit by 26 mph or more. A person who drives 26-34 mph above the speed limit will face a Class B misdemeanor, while a person exceeding the speed limit by 35 mph or more will face a Class A misdemeanor. This is the most serious type of misdemeanor, and it is one step away from a felony.

Penalties for Aggravated Speeding

A Class B misdemeanor is punishable by six months in jail and a $1,500 fine. A Class A misdemeanor means up to one year in jail and a fine of up to $2,500. The penalties increase when the speeding occurs in a school or construction zone.

An aggravated speeding conviction stays on your record for seven years. Unless you have your record sealed, such a charge will stay on your criminal record for the rest of your life.

Court supervision may be an option for those facing aggravated speeding charges. If you have never faced such a charge previously, you may be able to complete court supervision and keep the charge from appearing on your driving record. The terms of your supervision may include fines, community service, and traffic school.

Let Us Help You with Your Case

Speeding is typically an infraction that involves a ticket, fines, and traffic school. However, excessive speeding can result in a criminal record. Do not let a single speeding incident affect your life.

If you are facing misdemeanor charges for a speeding ticket, you need solid legal defense to avoid fines and jail time. Get help from the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley. Talented Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney Christopher Cosley has helped many clients who have been accused of driving at a speed exceeding the speed limit by 26 mph or more. Contact us today for professional help.


Illinois Drag Racing Laws and Consequences

February 9th, 2018 at 8:56 am

Class 4 felony, drag racing, Illinois license revocation, Illinois traffic offenses, street racingTV shows such as “Street Outlaws” make drag racing seem like fun and games. Two tricked-out cars go head to head in a race to see which one is faster. The drivers often bet money and whoever loses pays the winner.

Drag racers take their cars to the limit. They may travel at speeds exceeding 100 mph on city streets. Other drivers and pedestrians can end up seriously injured or even killed by the negligence of drag racers.

Not only is drag racing dangerous, it is also illegal. Drag racing is typically charged as a misdemeanor, but it can be a felony in some instances. 

Illinois Drag Racing Laws

Drag racing, also known as street racing, is considered illegal on all streets and highways in Illinois under Illinois law 625 ILCS 5/11-506. Drag racing is defined as the operation of at least two vehicles side by side traveling at high speeds that are trying to outdistance each other. It also involves one or more vehicles attempting to outdistance another, reach a destination before another, or prevent another vehicle from passing. Drag racing may also be referred to as a test of a driver’s stamina or physical endurance. The race may also occur over a common course.

Drag racing is considered a Class A misdemeanor, which is punishable by a $2,500 fine and up to one year in jail. It is also against the law to allow another person to use your vehicle for street racing. This is considered a Class B misdemeanor, which is punishable by a $1,500 fine and 180 days in jail.

There are situations in which drag racing can be a felony. Aggravated drag racing is defined as drag racing that causes a motor vehicle accident that leads to serious injury, disfigurement, or death. This is classified as a Class 4 felony, with punishment of 1-12 years in prison. A second offense of drag racing will also become a felony charge.

All drag racing convictions will also lead to license revocation or suspension for at least one year. To get your license reinstated, you will need to appear before a hearing office.

Contact Us Today for Professional Help

Drag racing may seem like an innocent act, especially late at night when the roads are deserted. However, drag racing can lead to crashes, serious injury, and even death. At the very least, you could face fines, jail time, and license loss.

If you are facing misdemeanor charges for drag racing or some other speeding offense, you could face jail time and fines. The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley can help reduce your charges. Skilled Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney Christopher Cosley can help you avoid serious penalties.


How is Reckless Driving Proven in Illinois?

December 28th, 2017 at 5:38 pm

reckless driving charges, reckless driving citations, Rolling Meadows reckless driving lawyer, traffic offenses, traffic violationsReckless driving, as defined under section 625 ILCS 5/11-503 of the Illinois Code, is committed in Illinois when a driver (a) drives with a willful or wanton disregard for the safety of people or property, or (b) knowingly uses an incline, bridge approach, railway crossing, or hill to make their vehicle go airborne. Furthermore, any person who drives recklessly and as a result causes permanent disability/disfigurement or great bodily harm to another can be convicted of aggravated reckless driving. But how can it be proven that someone drove recklessly? Reckless driving cases differ from case to case; however, consider the following various approaches that are commonly used to prove acts of reckless driving in Illinois.

Approaches Commonly Used to Prove Reckless Driving

If you choose to fight a reckless driving ticket in Illinois the opposition will be forced to present evidence in court establishing that you either drove with a willful or wanton disregard for safety or that you intentionally made your vehicle go airborne. This can be proven in a variety of different ways, but before discussing these various approaches let us take a quick look at what constitutes “willful or wanton” conduct.

Willful and wanton conduct is one of those legal phrases that can be a bit hard to pin a precise definition to, but in the context of reckless driving cases it is best to think of it as conduct that is engaged in with a conscious disregard for, or a with a reckless indifference to, the potential consequences of such an action.

Proving that a driver acted with willful or wanton disregard for safety is often accomplished in reckless driving cases via one or more of the following types evidence:

  • Eyewitness Evidence: Generally the police officer who issued the reckless driving citation at issue will testify to the manner in which he or she personally witnessed the accused driving. Other eyewitnesses, perhaps someone who got into an accident with the accused, may also be called forward to testify about what they saw.
  • Video Evidence: Nowadays, many police cruisers are equipped with dashboard cams and if such a camera captured the manner in which you were driving prior to being pulled over then this video may be presented as evidence against you. Additionally, footage captured on a cell phone by a witness may also be available as people frequently film the unusual behavior of others on their smartphones these days.
  • Radar Evidence: Many reckless driving citations issued in Illinois are based solely on a driver’s speed. When this is the case the issuing police officer will have likely captured evidence of your speed on their radar gun and will present such evidence, along with proof that his or her radar gun was properly calibrated, in court.

Charged with Reckless Driving in Illinois?

If you have been charged with reckless driving in Illinois, experienced Rolling Meadows reckless driving lawyer Christopher Cosley is here to help. Mr. Cosley has extensive experience providing legal assistance to clients who have been charged with a wide array of different traffic violations and would be happy to assist you. While each case is different, Mr. Cosley is often able to help clients keep traffic offenses off the public record, avoid increased insurance rates, prevent having their driver’s license suspended, and reduce or eliminate the other various consequences commonly associated with traffic violations. To find out what The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley can do for you schedule an initial consultation at our Rolling Meadows office today.


How Illinois’ DMV Point System Works

December 21st, 2017 at 8:19 am

DMV point system, driving record, penalty points, Rolling Meadows traffic violations lawyer, traffic violationsUnder Illinois’ DMV point system, Illinois drivers are assigned penalty points for a wide array of traffic violations. The more serious the violation the more points that the DMV will add to the driver’s record. For example, a driver who fails to obey a traffic sign will generally have 20 points added to his or her driver’s license while, on the other hand, a driver who is caught driving recklessly will often be assigned 55 points.

If you have recently accumulated a few minor traffic citations, or if you have broken a serious rule of the road, then it is important to be aware of how many points you currently have and the impact that these points can have on your ability to retain your driving privileges in Illinois.

The Impact of Points on Your Driving Record

Under Illinois’ DMV point system, a driver who receives three or more traffic citations within a 12-month period will generally have accumulated enough points on his or her record to be penalized with an administrative revocation or suspension of his or her driver’s license.

Furthermore, if your license is suspended due to having added too many points to your record during a 12-month period, then the length of the suspension is determined in part by how many points you currently have on your record and in part by whether or not the DMV has revoked or suspended your driver’s license within the past seven years.

Is it Possible to Reduce the Number of Points that I Have?

In other states a qualifying driver can reduce the number of points that have accumulated on his or her license by completing a driving safety course. Unfortunately, however, this option is not currently available to drivers in Illinois.

The only way to have points removed from your Illinois driver’s license is to wait the prescribed time period. Still, under some circumstances, Illinois drivers may be able to avoid adding points to their records in the first place by enrolling in a defensive driving course. This is because some courts in Illinois will allow a driver to take such a course in order to prevent additional points from being added to their record. Also, a local traffic violations lawyer may be able to help limit the number of points that will be added to your record by negotiating a reduced offense on your behalf.

Need Legal Advice? Contact Rolling Meadows Traffic Violations Lawyer Chris Cosley

If you have received a traffic ticket in Illinois and would like to learn more about how such a citation may impact the number of points on your record, contact dedicated Rolling Meadows traffic violations lawyer Chris Cosley today to schedule a free initial consultation. At The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley we are often able to successfully negotiate reduced offenses for our traffic violations clients. Call 847-394-3200 today.


Hit and Run Accidents in Illinois

September 25th, 2017 at 7:47 pm

hit and run accidents, property damage, accident scene, car accident, traffic offensesAccording to the Daily Herald, the Illinois State Police are searching for a semi truck driver who fled after hitting a 48-year-old tollway maintenance worker recently. The victim was picking up trash on the shoulder of the southbound Tri-State Tollway when the trucker allegedly hit him and sideswiped his parked vehicle. The driver did not stop and, sadly, the worker passed away from his injuries.

Fleeing the scene of an accident is illegal in Illinois and if the driver is found by the authorities, then he or she will undoubtedly find himself or herself in a world of legal trouble.

Fleeing the Scene of an Accident

Under code section 625 ILCS 5/11-401 of the Illinois Compiled Statutes, any driver who is involved in a motor vehicle accident involving personal injuries or death is legally obligated to immediately stop his or her vehicle.

Drivers are required to remain at the scene of the accident until they have fulfilled the exchange of information and rendering aid requirements outlined in code section 625 ILCS 5/11-403. Any driver who fails to abide by these requirements because they fled the scene of the accident is guilty of a “hit and run.”

Additionally, it should be noted that that is also illegal to flee the scene of an accident that results only in property damage. In other words, even if no one was injured in the accident you are still generally required to stay at the scene of the accident if the accident caused property damage. For example, code section 625 ILCS 5/11-402 states that any driver involved in an accident resulting in damage to a vehicle which is attended must immediately pull over and exchange information.


Anyone who is arrested for a hit and run in Illinois which resulted in personal injuries or death can be subjected to chemical testing for drugs and/or alcohol and can be charged with a Class 4 felony, which is punishable by imprisonment for up to three years and a fine of up to $25,000.

However, a hit and run offender can instead by charged with a Class 2 felony (which is punishable by imprisonment for up to seven years and a fine of up to $25,000) if aggravating circumstances are present, or a Class 1 felony (punishable by imprisonment for up to 15 years and a fine of up to $25,000) if the hit and run resulted in the death of another person.

Additionally, anyone who flees the scene of an accident that resulted only in property damage to an attended vehicle can be charged with a Class A misdemeanor, which is punishable by up to one year in jail and a fine of up to $2,500.

Charged With a Traffic Offense? Contact a Local Traffic Violations Defense Lawyer

Attorney Christopher Cosley, sole attorney at The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley, is a well respected Rolling Meadows traffic violations defense attorney who has extensive experience defending clients charged with hit and runs, as well as a wide variety of other traffic offenses. Contact our office today for assistance.


The Consequences of Driving Without Insurance in Illinois

September 18th, 2017 at 9:32 am

Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney, driving without insurance, traffic offenses, Illinois traffic offense, suspended driver's licenseIn Illinois, drivers are required by the Illinois State Legislature Vehicle Code to carry at least a minimum amount of auto insurance. Currently, in order to meet our state’s auto insurance requirements, Illinois drivers must carry at least the following amounts of liability insurance:

  • $25,000 for bodily injury per person,
  • $50,000 for bodily injury coverage per accident,
  • $20,000 for property damage,
  • $25,000 for uninsured motorist bodily injury coverage per person, and
  • $50,000 for uninsured motorist bodily injury coverage per accident.

Some people mistakenly believe that driving without adequate auto insurance in Illinois is not a big deal; however, in reality, drivers who are caught failing to meet our state’s insurance requirements suffer a number of different consequences, the most severe of which are outlined below.

Fines for Driving Without Adequate Insurance

Under code section 625 ILCS 5/3-707 of the Illinois Compiled Statutes, fines for a first offense of driving without adequate auto insurance in Illinois range from $500 to $1,000 while repeat offenders are required to pay a $1,000 fine for an ordinary violation and a $2,500 fine if they were caught after causing an accident in which someone else was injured.

Additionally, Illinois residents who are convicted of driving without adequate insurance also have to pay an additional $100 reinstatement fee to get their driving privileges back if their driver’s license is suspended because they drove without adequate insurance.

Other Consequences

Illinois residents who are caught driving without adequate insurance can also have their driver’s licenses suspended. Generally speaking, a first time offender will have his or her driver’s license suspended for three months, at the end of which the license will be reinstated if the offender is able to show proof of insurance and pay the reinstatement fee.

However, each license suspension comes with certain provisions that must be abided by or else the suspension will be extended for an additional six months. Furthermore, it should be noted that driving on a suspended licenses in Illinois is a Class A misdemeanor that is punishable by up to one year in prison and a fine of up to $2,500.

Additionally, a driver who has been caught driving without adequate auto insurance may find that when he or she is able to obtain insurance, he or she will be required to pay higher insurance rates than drivers who do not have such a blemish on their record.

Consult With a Local Attorney

If you have been caught driving without adequate insurance in Illinois, then you are likely facing fines, having your driver’s license suspended, and perhaps other additional penalties. However, the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley may be able to help.

Attorney Chris Cosley is an experienced Rolling Meadows criminal defense attorney who tirelessly fights for his clients’ rights and driving privileges and helps them avoid criminal convictions whenever possible. Contact the office today.


Petty Traffic Offenses & Misdemeanors

July 3rd, 2017 at 7:00 am

petty traffic offenses, Rolling Meadows traffic violations defense lawyer, moving violations, Class C misdemeanor, suspended licenseIt is not uncommon for people to treat moving violations as inconsequential or somehow beneath notice, therefore paying the requested fine quickly and proceeding on their merry way. However, many will then receive a rude awakening as their driving privileges are affected, especially if they have a history of multiple speeding tickets or other moving violations. Therefore, it is important for Illinois drivers to be aware of the potentially punitive consequences that may result if too many tickets or citations are incurred.

Classification Differences

The significant majority of traffic offenses are characterized as either petty or as misdemeanors under Illinois law. Petty offenses are punishable with merely a fine, usually no more than $1,000, though there are always exceptions depending on the egregious nature of the conduct. Examples include driving without auto insurance and failing to wear a seat belt while driving or riding in an automobile. While a petty offense is still something to take seriously, it is the lightest type of offense that can appear on one’s record, and is the classification for which it is most likely to receive supervision or probation as a sentence instead of a particularly heavy fine.

Misdemeanors, comparatively, are more serious and may carry jail time as part or all of the sentence handed down at conviction—there are three classes of misdemeanor, A through C, with A being the most severe.

An example of a Class C misdemeanor would be drag racing, while a Class A misdemeanor would be driving without a license or on a suspended license. Class A misdemeanors are held to be more likely to injure participants or bystanders, as well as to possess an exaggerated degree of recklessness or negligence compared to petty offenses.

Misdemeanor traffic offenses may sometimes receive a sentence of court supervision, but it is decidedly less common than with those convicted of petty offenses.

Minor Offenses Can Add Up

While the relative consequences for petty and misdemeanor traffic offenses are much less significant than those associated with felonies, this does not mean that minor traffic offenses may simply be ignored, or paid and forgotten. For example, if an Illinois driver accrues three moving violations (whether petty or misdemeanor offenses) in one 12-month span, it results in an automatic, mandatory license suspension. That suspension will expire on a specific calendar date, but only if the driver’s record has been clean for that period of time.

It is also possible to receive a license suspension over failure to pay fines associated with petty offenses and misdemeanors of any class. If a driver fails to pay the costs associated with five or more automatic traffic violations, then his or her license will be automatically suspended in much the same manner as it would be with multiple moving violations on one’s record. The driver will not be able to reinstate his or her license without presenting proof that any remaining fines or penalties have been paid, and any attempt to drive without reinstating his or her license may result in a re-suspension (as driving on a suspended license is in itself a suspendable offense).

Consult a Knowledgeable Illinois Criminal Defense Attorney

Because traffic offenses are seen as such relatively inconsequential affairs, it can be a momentous shock when your license is suspended over the amount of these minor offenses. Consulting an attorney with experience in such matters can greatly ease one’s mind, or at least articulate exactly what one faces in the near future.

The dedicated Rolling Meadows traffic violations defense lawyer at The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley is well versed in this specific area of law, and is happy to try and assist you with your case. Contact the office today to set up an initial consultation.


City Admits Wrongdoing When Trying to Fix Previous Error on Red Light Tickets

June 26th, 2017 at 7:00 am

red light tickets, Rolling Meadows traffic ticket lawyer, speeding tickets, traffic offenses, traffic violationsThe city of Chicago had inaccuracies on 1.9 million red light and speed-camera tickets. In an attempt to correct this mistake, it appears that Mayor Rahm Emanuel may have exacerbated the issue.

City Hall sent mail to recipients of the red light and speed camera tickets. The letters received attempted to offer another chance to appeal the tickets in court. The measure is widely identified as an effort to ward off a class-action lawsuit, pleading that the city failed to provide ticket holders enough time or notice to challenge their tickets.

One Cook County resident received five red light camera tickets for which she could only make out two of the videos. She was quoted as saying, “It’s alarming that they would do something like this.”

An official spokesman, Michael Claffey, indicated that the process to correct the fault in the system denying people adequate notice to contest their tickets would take considerable time to rectify.

Cook County offered no explanation for the issue, but opined that the malfunction might have been a result of the high traffic on the city’s website. The offer from the city to allow ticket holders another opportunity to appeal their tickets comes after a Cook County Circuit Judge denied a motion from the city to dismiss a class-action suit alleging the city violated due process by failing to provide adequate notice.

A Chicago attorney stated, “the Emanuel administration’s effort to force people to relitigate the city’s illegal behavior is a sham.” That same attorney explained that out of the 37 cases related to these red light cameras, 18 had no photographs or videos.

Need to Contest a Red Light Camera Ticket?

If you or a loved one has received a ticket in the mail from a red light camera or speed camera, you may have an opportunity to fight it. Rolling Meadows traffic ticket lawyer Christopher M. Cosley is an experienced and proven defense lawyer who represents his clients in a litany of issues relating to traffic violations.

Do not blindly accept that you have no options when you receive a ticket. Call The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley at 847-394-3200 to schedule your initial consultation. Or, visit our website Our 24-hour answering service is designed to get you the advice you need when you need it.


Traffic Citations and Your Driving Record in Illinois

May 24th, 2017 at 7:13 am

traffic citations, Rolling MeadowsStandard moving violations will usually stay on your driving record for up to five years from the time you are convicted, according to the Illinois Secretary of state. Standard moving violations include:

  • Speeding;
  • Disobeying a stop sign;
  • Disobeying a traffic light; and
  • Improper lane usage.

However, traffic violations whose penalties result in a suspension or revocation can stay on your driving record for at least seven years. That timeline will not start until the date you get your license reinstated.  The caveat to that general rule are traffic violations that include alcohol or drugs, like a DUI for example. Those kinds of convictions may stay on your Illinois driving record for the rest of your life.

Is There Any Way I Can Keep a Traffic Ticket Off My Driving Record?

That is a question for your Cook County traffic violation attorney. Generally, the only way to accomplish that is to receive court supervision as a punishment for your traffic violation or getting the charge dropped or dismissed.

Traffic violation convictions not only cause your insurance rates to increase but they also count as points towards getting your license suspended. When faced with a traffic violation, it is important that you speak with an experienced and knowledgeable traffic violation defense lawyer to give you the best shot at keeping traffic infractions off of your record.

Understand Your Rights

It is important that you understand what rights you have at a traffic stop. When a police officer stops you and begins asking questions, it is usually not polite conversation. He or she is beginning their investigation into whether or not you have committed a moving violation or a more serious offense.

The majority of convictions in Illinois occur as a result of an arrestee giving more incriminating evidence than was necessary to the police.  Questions that are appropriate to answer include but are not limited to the following:

  • What is your name?
  • Where are you going?
  • Do you have your driver’s license?
  • Do you have proof of insurance?
  • Do you know why I have stopped you? (simple yes or no)

Questions and request intended to incriminate you include:

  • Can I search your car?
  • Have you been drinking?
  • Do you have anything illegal in the car?

When You Need a Lawyer

The criminal justice system is a complex terrain that requires a knowledgeable and experienced Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer. Attorney Christopher M. Cosley is a respected and proven attorney. At The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley, you will receive dedicated and compassionate representation. Contact us at 847-394-3200, 24 hours a day, to schedule your consultation and get the representation you deserve.


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