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Archive for the ‘Domestic Violence’ Category

Domestic Violence and Protective Orders in Illinois: A General Overview

October 9th, 2017 at 9:32 am

domestic violence, protective order, restraining orders, Rolling Meadows domestic violence lawyer, domestic batteryProtective orders (also commonly referred to as restraining orders) are civil orders designed to protect alleged domestic violence victims (and sometimes their family members as well) against future abuse. Under the Illinois Domestic Violence Act courts in Illinois are permitted to issue a protective order if any of the following types of domestic violence has likely been perpetrated against the requesting petitioner, or their minor child, by a family or household member:

  • Physical abuse,
  • Harassment,
  • Intimidation of a dependent,
  • Interference with personal liberty, or
  • Willful deprivation.

Who Qualifies as a “Family or Household Member?”

It is important to note that in Illinois a domestic violence protective order can only be issued if the alleged abuser is a family or household member of the petitioner. Code section 750 ILCS 60/103(6) defines “family or household member” as:

  • A former or current spouse,
  • A parent,
  • A child or stepchild,
  • Someone related to the petitioner by blood or marriage (either present or prior),
  • Someone whom the petitioner currently (or formerly) lives with,
  • Someone the petitioner allegedly shares a child in common with,
  • Someone the petitioner shares (or allegedly shares) a blood relationship with through a child,
  • A former or current boyfriend, girlfriend, or fiance, or
  • A disabled petitioner’s personal assistant or caretaker.

What am I Prohibited From Doing if a Protective Order is Issued Against Me?

In Illinois we have three different types of domestic violence protective orders. These include emergency protective orders, interim protective order, and plenary protective orders. The key difference between these orders is the duration for which they can be in effect. Yet while in effect they can all prohibit alleged abusers from engaging in the same actions. It is up to the issuing judge to determine the provisions of a particular protective order but some commonly included provisions are:

  • No harassing, stalking, abusing, or intimidating the petitioner,
  • No contacting the petitioner,
  • No coming within a specified distance of the petitioner, the petitioner’s home, or the petitioner’s place of work, and
  • No possessing firearms.

How Can I Fight a Protective Order?

If you have been served with a protective order, then the first step that you need to take is to stay calm. Do not lash out at the person who served you and definitely do not contact the person who requested a restraining order against you.

What you should do is read through the order and make sure to fully abide by every provision contained in it. Now you are ready to fight the order, if you wish to do so. This can most effectively be accomplished by consulting with a local domestic violence lawyer, although you can technically oppose the order on your own if you like.

In either instance, fighting a protective order generally involves filing a response with the court, gathering evidence in your defense, and appearing in court in order to tell your side of the story.

Consult With a Local Domestic Violence Lawyer

If you have been accused of committing domestic battery or have had a protective order issued against you in Illinois contact The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley straight away.

Christopher Cosley is a very well respected Rolling Meadows domestic violence lawyer who has extensive experience defending clients throughout the greater Chicago area. Don’t hesitate to contact the office today for help.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs3.asp?ActID=2100&ChapterID=59

The Three Types of Protective Orders Available in Illinois

July 17th, 2017 at 12:13 pm

protective orders, Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer, Illinois criminal defense, Illinois protective order, protective order violationIn Illinois, there are three different types of protective orders (also referred to as restraining orders); emergency protective orders, interim protective orders, and plenary protective orders. If a protective order has been filed against you it is important that you understand which type of order you are facing so that you can take the necessary steps to protect your legal rights. Read on to learn about the three types of protective orders available in Illinois and then contact a local order of protection criminal defense lawyer to discuss your legal options.

Emergency Protective Orders

An emergency protective order offers short-term protection to the accuser and can be issued solely based on his or her testimony. Furthermore, under some circumstances an emergency protective order can be issued ex parte, i.e. against you without prior notice. Emergency protective orders are temporary in nature and are designed to be in effect until a full hearing for a more long-term protective order can be held (this usually takes place within 14-21 days).

Interim Protective Orders

In some cases it takes awhile before a full restraining order hearing can be held. When this happens, the court may issue an interim protective order to be in effect from the date on which the accuser’s emergency protective order expires until the full court hearing takes place. Interim protective orders can be in effect for up to 30 days. However, an interim protective order can only be issued against you in Illinois if you have had a chance to make an initial appearance in court and have been properly notified of the date on which your full restraining order hearing will take place.

Plenary Protective Orders

Plenary protective orders are unique because unlike the other types of protective orders that are available in Illinois plenary orders offer long-term protection. Plenary protective orders may last up to two years and, under 750 ILCS 60/220(e), may be renewed an unlimited number of times. However, a court will not issue a plenary protective order until after holding a hearing in which both the accuser and the accused have had a chance to present their cases.

A Protective Order Has Been Filed Against Me, What Should I Do Now?

The circumstances surrounding each protective order are different, so the best thing that you can do is consult with a local criminal defense attorney about the specifics of your case. However, it is generally also advisable to avoid all contact with your accuser (this includes calling or texting them!), attend every hearing that has been scheduled, and fully comply with every provision of the order against you.

Reach Out to Us for Assistance

If you need help opposing an Illinois protective order, or defending yourself against an alleged protective order violation, the experienced Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyers of The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley are here to help. Our firm is located in Rolling Meadows but we are dedicated to defending adults and juveniles throughout the greater Chicago area.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=075000600K220

Strangling is Aggravated Domestic Battery in Illinois

April 24th, 2017 at 7:00 am

strangling-Rolling Meadows Domestic Violence Defense Lawyer Many people live in some sort of domestic relationship at home. You might live with a significant other or even with a family member. Of course, sometimes tensions can rise between people who live together or lived together in a domestic relationship, and things can get out of hand.

When one person physically hits or strikes the other, it can constitute domestic battery, which is a crime in Illinois. When actions escalate and the violence is extreme, or strangling is involved, the battery is considered aggravated domestic battery.

What is Domestic Battery in Illinois?

In Illinois, domestic battery is defined as when an individual causes bodily harm or makes physical contact of an insulting or provoking nature against a family member or household member without legal justification to do so. Physically hitting, biting, violently threatening, etc. are all acts of violence. When you commit these acts against a family member or a household member, you could face domestic battery criminal charges. A first time offense is a Class A misdemeanor, while a second or repeat offense (after a domestic violence conviction) can be a Class 4 felony.

There is a second tier for domestic battery, referred to as aggravated domestic battery, which covers physically harmful conduct that is committed against a family or household member that is more severe than simple domestic battery.

What is Aggravated Domestic Battery in Illinois?

When the physical violence committed against a family or household member is more serious, then you can be charged with aggravated domestic battery. Specifically, engaging in physical contact with a household or family member with full knowledge that your physical contact will cause great bodily harm, disfigurement, or permanent disability is aggravated domestic battery.

Similarly, strangling a household or family member also constitutes aggravated domestic battery. Strangling involves deliberately impeding the normal breathing of the victim and/or preventing circulation of blood to the brain of the victim by applying pressure to the neck or throat of the victim. It does not matter if the act of strangling was for just a second or for several seconds. Moreover, even just one instance of strangling can be enough to support a conviction. Aggravated domestic battery is a Class 2 felony.

Domestic battery allegations are fairly common in Illinois, and when someone is falsely accused of domestic battery it can be problematic for the individual who stands accused. An angry ex or your current significant other, roommate, or family member might lodge false or exaggerated allegations to the authorities that you engaged in domestic violence against them. It is unfair when these things happen and if you are charged with domestic battery in Illinois, you need to contact an experienced criminal defense lawyer immediately.

Get a Criminal Defense Lawyer on Your Side Now

Please contact a passionate Rolling Meadows domestic violence defense lawyer as soon as you can if you are facing domestic battery or aggravated domestic battery criminal charges. We can help craft a solid defense in your case.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=072000050K12-3.2

Domestic Battery Requires a Certain Relationship Between the Accused and the Accuser

February 27th, 2017 at 12:16 pm

domestic battery, Rolling Meadows Criminal Defense LawyerIn Illinois, domestic battery charges are taken very seriously. Just a first time conviction can result in a number of consequences. Possible jail time, a fine, and a criminal record are a few of the more obvious consequences of a domestic battery conviction. However, a conviction can also cause you problems in a child custody battle or when you apply for certain types of employment. Anyone who is facing criminal domestic battery charges needs to seek the help of an experienced criminal defense lawyer as soon as possible.

Victim and Abuser Relations That Warrant Domestic Battery Charges

Domestic battery charges are reserved for alleged abusers and victims that are in a specific domestic relationship with one another. The abuser and the victim must be in a familial relationship or the two must be members of the same household. For instance, battery that occurs between two people in the following relationships constitutes domestic battery:

  • Husband and wife;
  • Boyfriend and girlfriend;
  • Ex spouses;
  • Ex significant others;
  • Two people who share a child;
  • Siblings;
  • A parent and a child or stepchild;
  • An adult grandchild and a grandparent;
  • Anyone related by blood or marriage;
  • Two people living together, such as roommates;
  • Two people who formerly lived together; or
  • People who have disabilities and their caretakers or personal assistance.

Knowingly causing physical harm to someone with whom you share a domestic relationship without legal justification for your actions is domestic battery under Illinois law if you cause the other person bodily harm. It is also considered domestic battery to make physical contact with someone you share a domestic relationship with in a provoking or insulting way. Unjustified pushing, shoving, hitting, or controlling behavior are all types of domestic battery.

Why it is Important to Fight Domestic Battery Charges?

A domestic battery conviction is a serious matter. Generally speaking, you cannot get a domestic battery conviction expunged from your criminal record—government entities and prospective employers and landlords could view your criminal history and learn that you are a convicted domestic batterer. In limited circumstances can you qualify to have your domestic battery conviction expunged, and after it has been on your record for five years.

Only a skilled and experienced domestic battery criminal defense lawyer will be able to help you fight the charges that are pending against you. Even if you were acting out of self defense, or you believe that the physical contact was an accident, you need to discuss your potential defenses with a lawyer.

Contact The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley

False allegations of domestic battery happen all the time, and someone could be wrongly accused and prosecuted for a domestic battery that did not occur. An experienced Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer will work with you to establish the facts and determine what defense strategy is best for you.

Sources:

https://www.illinois.gov/osad/Expungement/Documents/Crinminal%20Exp%20Guide/ExpungementSealingOverview.pdf

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=072000050K12-3.2

Charged With Domestic Violence When You Acted in Self-Defense?

November 18th, 2016 at 9:39 am

domestic violence, self-defense, Rolling MeadowsDomestic disputes occur between significant others and family members frequently in Illinois. Sometimes these  get out of hand and rise to the level of domestic violence.  

Under Illinois law, domestic violence generally involves acts of violence or threatening behavior between two people who share a domestic relationship, or used to share a domestic relationship. Domestic violence disputes arise between spouses, exes, significant others, family members who are related by blood or marriage, and people who share a living space, such as roommates.

Even the most minor physical contact can be construed as a battery. If you are concerned that someone is likely to make a false claim of domestic violence against you, you should avoid making physical contact with that person at all costs. But just because you deliberately refrain from physical contact does not mean that someone will not make an attack on you.

Charged with Domestic Violence When You Acted in Self-Defense

There are many cases of domestic assault and battery where the accused is charged with domestic violence when he or she was merely acting in self-defense. While it is unfortunate that charges are being pressed against you for domestic violence, it is fortunate that self-defense could be a potential defense to these charges.

Under Illinois law, a person is justified to use force against another when he or she believes that the use of force is necessary to defend him or herself from imminent harm from another’s use of force. A skilled Illinois criminal defense lawyer can examine the specifics of your case and help ensure the charges are dropped against you if you were acting in self defense.

Defense of Others Might Also be a Defense to Domestic Violence Charges

Not only can you act in self defense, but you can also act in the defense of others. Another common scenario where domestic violence charges are filed involves one person acting violently or threateningly against someone else, where a third party steps in to aid in the defense of the victim. If this occurred in your case, it is imperative that you speak to an attorney as soon as possible to ensure your rights are protected.

Let Us Help With Your Domestic Violence Defense

If you are faced with allegations of domestic violence, but you believe that your actions were justified as an act of self defense or the defense of others, you should contact a dedicated Rolling Meadows domestic violence defense lawyer as soon as possible. Our attorneys can examine the specifics of your criminal charges in Illinois, and utilize our knowledge and experience to help craft a solid defense. Reach out to us today for a consultation and to learn how we can be of assistance.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs3.asp?ChapterID=59&ActID=2100

Three Reasons Why You Need To Fight Your Domestic Battery Charges

September 30th, 2016 at 3:05 pm

Fight Your Domestic Battery ChargesThe Illinois courts and law enforcement do not take kindly to those who are accused of committing domestic battery. Causing bodily harm to a family or household member, or insulting, provoking, or threatening them, is a serious criminal matter in Illinois. When a person is accused of domestic battery, it is critically important that they fight the charges that are lodged against them because even a first-time conviction carries severe and long-lasting consequences. An experienced criminal defense attorney can help.

Below are three reasons why you need to fight your domestic battery charges.

  1. A domestic battery conviction means you will have a criminal record. Even if your fight with a family or household member was just a minor dispute that got out of hand, the court will look at the altercation as a serious crime. Even a first-time offense for domestic battery is typically a misdemeanor level offense. But a domestic battery charge can be upgraded to a felony-level offense in certain situations, such as when a protection order was violated, when you have a record of prior domestic battery convictions, or when other aggravating factors were involved.
  2. A domestic battery conviction generally cannot be sealed or expunged from your criminal record. Once you have been convicted of a criminal battery against a family or household member, as a general rule, the conviction will go on your criminal record, and it cannot be expunged or sealed under Illinois law. This means that your domestic battery conviction will follow you for many years to come. There are very limited circumstances in which a domestic battery conviction may be expunged. An experienced criminal defense attorney can help you determine if you may be eligible.
  3. A domestic battery conviction has unintended consequences. The effect of a domestic battery conviction is far-reaching. For instance:
    • You can lose your right to own or carry a firearm;
    • You could lose out on job opportunities due to the fact an employer can view your criminal record;
    • You could be denied an apartment or a credit card;
    • You could lose your child visitation privileges, or have restrictions placed on your visitation rights.

Contact The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley

Being charged with a domestic battery comes with severe consequences, and you need to fight the charges. If you are facing domestic battery charges, a conviction can have a serious impact on your life and can affect you in ways that you may not foresee. You need the help of an experienced criminal defense lawyer who has helped defendants facing domestic battery charges. A dedicated Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyer can assist you every step of the way.

Source:
http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=072000050K12-3.2

Falsely Accused of Domestic Battery: What Is, and Is Not Domestic Violence?

July 22nd, 2016 at 7:34 am

Illinois domestic violence case, Rolling Meadows Domestic Violence Defense LawyerMany Illinois families and couples find themselves in disagreements. They might yell at each other, act aggressively, or maybe behave in a crazy manner. Sometimes things get out of control and the police are called. One of the people involved in the fight might make the call, or a concerned neighbor could do it. When the police are called to investigate an alleged domestic dispute, they can make an arrest if they believe that a crime, such as domestic abuse, has been committed. Because the situation is often tense when the police show up, and those involved in the fight are often emotional, things are said, exaggerations might be made, and the police might haul off one party, even though his or her actions during the fight did not really rise to the level of domestic violence.

False allegations of domestic violence are made all too frequently, and it can be a major inconvenience, and even a problem, for the accused abuser. As a criminal defendant charged with domestic violence, you are facing serious consequences if you are convicted. That is why it is so important to work with an experienced criminal defense lawyer who understands domestic violence defense to fight the charges that have been levied against you.

Acts That Constitutes Domestic Violence

It is likely an act of domestic violence if the aggression takes the form of:

  • Hitting, punching, pushing, kicking or otherwise striking;
  • Choking or strangling;
  • Threatening to harm or kill;
  • Harassing;
  • Intimidation;
  • Forced sex; and/or
  • Preventing the other person from leaving, calling the police, or otherwise interfering with their personal liberty.

Other acts toe the line when it comes to whether or not they rise to the level of domestic violence. For instance, yelling – in its own right – would not necessarily be enough for domestic violence charges to stick, unless the yelling involves threats. Throwing or slamming objects in the home might not rise to the level of domestic violence unless the item is thrown at a victim, or if the throwing or slamming is done is a threatening way.

Defenses to Domestic Violence Allegations

There are a limited number of defenses that make sense in a domestic violence case, but any one of them can be raised against false accusations of domestic violence. Some of the most common defenses include:

  • The victim is lying or exaggerating. There are plenty of instances where an alleged victim might lie or exaggerate what happened, which can prompt police to make an arrest for domestic violence.
  • The physical harm suffered by the victim was the result of an accident. Sometimes an act of domestic violence is the result of an accident (e.g., the couple was fighting, she threw a plate, and when it shattered, fragments got into his eyes).
  • The alleged abuser was acting in self-defense. The victim might have started the domestic dispute, and the alleged abuser might have struck the victim as a means of self-defense.

Contact The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley

If you are faced with false allegations of domestic violence, contact a Rolling Meadows domestic violence defense lawyer as soon as possible. We can help you throughout each step of your case.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs4.asp?DocName=075000600HArt%2E+III&ActID=2100&ChapterID=59&SeqStart=4200000&SeqEnd=5000000

Domestic Battery Convictions Are Tough to Expunge From Your Illinois Criminal Record

June 15th, 2016 at 8:53 am

Illinois domestic battery convictions, Rolling Meadows Domestic Violence Defense LawyerThere are certain criminal convictions that just stick with you, and a conviction for an act of domestic violence is one of the crimes that cannot be easily expunged from a convicted individual’s record. Your criminal record is viewable by police officers, potential employers (in certain circumstances), the military, and potential landlords. If you have a criminal record, you may also be required to disclose it if you want to apply for professional school and to certain jobs. A conviction for domestic battery can also negatively impact your child custody or child visitation situation, if you have one.  

With such an extensive list of long-term consequences riding on your domestic battery conviction, it is important that you work closely with a skilled and diligent criminal defense lawyer to fight the charges that are pending against you.

Domestic Violence Convictions Can be Expunged

Domestic violence convictions can be expunged from your criminal record, but it takes a lot of work and time. There are certain criteria that must be satisfied in order to be eligible for expungement of a domestic violence conviction. These criteria include:

  • The domestic violence conviction must be the only conviction you have on your criminal record;
  • Your sentence must be served through court supervision, i.e., your sentence does not require you to spend time in jail; and
  • Your conviction must have been more than five years ago if you want to seek expungement of the conviction from your criminal record.

If you are eligible for expungement of your domestic battery conviction, you still have a long way to go before getting a clean record. There are forms to complete and file with the court, and you may possibly have to go to court and defend why your domestic battery conviction should be expunged. You may even have to fight for you expungement if the state’s attorney thinks that your expungement is unjust, and objects to it. An experienced expungement lawyer can be useful at a time like this so that you can present your strongest possible case in support of your criminal conviction for domestic battery being expunged.

Charges Dropped or Dismissed

Domestic violence charges that are dropped or dismissed do not result in a criminal conviction. As such, you will not generate a criminal record with a domestic battery conviction on it, so there is no need to expunge your record. It is often best to attempt to get the domestic violence charges you are facing either dropped or dismissed in the first place, since it can help you not have to go through a trial, conviction or sentencing.

Reach Out to an Attorney for Help

Getting a conviction for a domestic battery can have serious consequences on your life, especially since there is no chance that the conviction will be expunged from your criminal record. It is important to fight domestic battery charges so that they are dismissed or reduced. A Rolling Meadows domestic violence defense lawyer can help. Let us assist you today.

Source:

https://www.illinois.gov/osad/Expungement/Pages/default.aspx

Defense Strategies in an Illinois Domestic Violence Case

April 6th, 2016 at 7:25 am

Illinois domestic violence case, Rolling Meadows Domestic Violence Defense LawyerThere are a number of individuals who face domestic violence charges in Illinois and do not know what to do about the charges that are pending against them. Criminal charges can be scary and serious, as a conviction can have a long-term impact on a person’s life.

A domestic violence conviction can impact a person’s ability to go near the alleged victim, stay in their own home, or could impact their child custody or visitation rights. An experienced domestic violence criminal defense lawyer can help with domestic assault and battery charges and any other domestic violence-related legal assistance you might need, such as dealing with charges concerning a violation of a protection order or charges of domestic battery. Criminal defense can be technical and confusing, but those who stand accused should have an understanding of their legal options.

Strategies for Fighting Domestic Violence Charges

Below is a general overview of a few typical legal options that defendants facing domestic violence criminal charges might have, depending on the specific facts of their case. Each domestic violence case is unique, and as such, not all of the below strategies might work in any given situation. Consult with a domestic violence lawyer about your case and what options are relevant to your situation.

  1. Dismissal of Charges. The first and foremost strategy is to try and get the charges against you dismissed. This can happen in a number of ways, and your lawyer will review your case carefully to see which options you have. There might be a procedural error in your case, or some other reason why the domestic violence charges against you should be dropped by the court (i.e., insufficient evidence, an error in the charging documents, etc.). Your lawyer can use a pretrial motion to get your case dismissed if there are circumstances that warrant dismissal.  
  2. When Charges Are Based on False Allegations. When the domestic violence allegations pending against you are false, your case could be won by proving that the allegations are false. There might be evidence to support your position that the allegations were made up by the alleged victim, and if so, this evidence could get your charges dropped if presented to the court. Your lawyer will help you determine if there is strong evidence in your case, and whether the evidence will be useable in court, to support your case.
  3. When An Incident Was Not Domestic Violence. There may be facts or circumstances that support a defense that no domestic violence took place. The police might have been called to a “situation” at a domicile, but there may not ever have been allegations of domestic violence made by anyone in the domicile. Instead, the police might have jumped to conclusions and made an arrest when they should not have.

Reach Out to Us for Help

Domestic violence charges are serious. Having an experienced criminal defense lawyer will go a long way towards getting your charges dropped or reduced, and will help ensure that you receive fair treatment under the law as a criminal defendant. Please contact a dedicated Rolling Meadows domestic violence defense lawyer as soon as you are able. We can help you throughout each step of your case.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs5.asp?ActID=2100&ChapterID=59

Interfering with the Reporting of Instances of Illinois Domestic Violence

April 4th, 2016 at 8:21 am

Illinois domestic violence, Rolling Meadows Defense LawyerSometimes domestic situations get out of hand. One person in a relationship or family situation, often a male, might lose his temper or act out angrily at his partner, ex, or family member. The other party, often a woman, is the alleged victim, and she might feel threatened, fearful, or vindictive and could over-react to the situation. She might want to call the police and report the incident as an instance of domestic violence.

Calling the police for a domestic violence situation is a serious matter, since the cops are most likely leaving the scene with someone in custody, usually the alleged abuser. Many people know this and do not want to be arrested. Threats made by the alleged victim to call the police can prompt the alleged abuser to interfere with the victim making the call to the authorities. The alleged abuser might:

  • Try to physically prevent the victim from placing a call to the police;
  • Threaten the victim further;
  • Break, destroy, or disable the phone;
  • Attempt to make it difficult for the victim to speak to the police on the phone;
  • Attempt to make it difficult for the police to hear the victim on the phone; and/or
  • Try to prevent the victim from telling the police something if the police arrive at the scene.

Any of the above examples are attempts to interfere with the reporting of domestic violence, which is prohibited by law under 720 ILCS 5/12-3.5. If you are facing domestic violence allegations, and allegations that you interfered with the reporting of domestic violence, you need to speak with an experienced Illinois criminal defense lawyer as soon as possible. You face serious charges, and a lawyer can help you defend yourself and your rights.

Interfering with the Reporting of Domestic Violence

Specifically, the statute on interfering with the reporting of domestic violence prohibits a person from preventing, or attempting to prevent a victim or a witness from reporting an instance of domestic violence. It can also be considered interfering with the reporting of domestic violence if a person prevents a victim from getting the medical attention or care that he 0r she needs after an instance of domestic violence. The resulting criminal charges are a Class A misdemeanor.  

Charges of interfering with the reporting of domestic violence are often accompanied by domestic violence charges, such as domestic battery, aggravated domestic battery, and violation of a protection order. Defendants are often charged with both, but sometimes one or both of the charges can be dropped if the facts do not support a conviction.

Let Us Assist You Today

When you are facing domestic violence charges, or charges for interfering with the reporting of domestic violence, there is a lot at stake and you need to consult with an experienced criminal defense lawyer. Please contact a passionate Rolling Meadows defense lawyer at our firm immediately. Our skilled advocates are prepared to help you today.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs4.asp?ActID=1876&ChapterID=53&SeqStart=21100000&SeqEnd=23000000

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