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Domestic Violence and Protective Orders in Illinois: A General Overview

October 9th, 2017 at 9:32 am

domestic violence, protective order, restraining orders, Rolling Meadows domestic violence lawyer, domestic batteryProtective orders (also commonly referred to as restraining orders) are civil orders designed to protect alleged domestic violence victims (and sometimes their family members as well) against future abuse. Under the Illinois Domestic Violence Act courts in Illinois are permitted to issue a protective order if any of the following types of domestic violence has likely been perpetrated against the requesting petitioner, or their minor child, by a family or household member:

  • Physical abuse,
  • Harassment,
  • Intimidation of a dependent,
  • Interference with personal liberty, or
  • Willful deprivation.

Who Qualifies as a “Family or Household Member?”

It is important to note that in Illinois a domestic violence protective order can only be issued if the alleged abuser is a family or household member of the petitioner. Code section 750 ILCS 60/103(6) defines “family or household member” as:

  • A former or current spouse,
  • A parent,
  • A child or stepchild,
  • Someone related to the petitioner by blood or marriage (either present or prior),
  • Someone whom the petitioner currently (or formerly) lives with,
  • Someone the petitioner allegedly shares a child in common with,
  • Someone the petitioner shares (or allegedly shares) a blood relationship with through a child,
  • A former or current boyfriend, girlfriend, or fiance, or
  • A disabled petitioner’s personal assistant or caretaker.

What am I Prohibited From Doing if a Protective Order is Issued Against Me?

In Illinois we have three different types of domestic violence protective orders. These include emergency protective orders, interim protective order, and plenary protective orders. The key difference between these orders is the duration for which they can be in effect. Yet while in effect they can all prohibit alleged abusers from engaging in the same actions. It is up to the issuing judge to determine the provisions of a particular protective order but some commonly included provisions are:

  • No harassing, stalking, abusing, or intimidating the petitioner,
  • No contacting the petitioner,
  • No coming within a specified distance of the petitioner, the petitioner’s home, or the petitioner’s place of work, and
  • No possessing firearms.

How Can I Fight a Protective Order?

If you have been served with a protective order, then the first step that you need to take is to stay calm. Do not lash out at the person who served you and definitely do not contact the person who requested a restraining order against you.

What you should do is read through the order and make sure to fully abide by every provision contained in it. Now you are ready to fight the order, if you wish to do so. This can most effectively be accomplished by consulting with a local domestic violence lawyer, although you can technically oppose the order on your own if you like.

In either instance, fighting a protective order generally involves filing a response with the court, gathering evidence in your defense, and appearing in court in order to tell your side of the story.

Consult With a Local Domestic Violence Lawyer

If you have been accused of committing domestic battery or have had a protective order issued against you in Illinois contact The Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley straight away.

Christopher Cosley is a very well respected Rolling Meadows domestic violence lawyer who has extensive experience defending clients throughout the greater Chicago area. Don’t hesitate to contact the office today for help.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs3.asp?ActID=2100&ChapterID=59

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Written by Staff Writer

October 9th, 2017 at 9:32 am

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