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Criminal Trespass in Illinois: The Basics

August 14th, 2017 at 7:00 am

criminal trespass, private property, Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyers, trespassing, vehicle trespassLandowners and occupants in Illinois have the right to exclude people from trespassing on their property. Therefore, entering onto someone else’s private property without permission to do so can constitute a civil trespass as the trespasser violated the owner/occupant’s exclusive possession of the land.

However, in Illinois a trespasser can also be charged with criminal trespass under some circumstances. Three of the most commonly charged forms of criminal trespass in Illinois are outlined below.

Criminal Trespass to Real Property: Code Section 720 ILCS 5/21-3

Here in Illinois the crime of criminal trespass to real property is defined in section 720 ILCS 5/21-3 of the Illinois Compiled Statutes and states that an individual is guilty of criminal trespass when he or she:

  • Enters or remains in a building knowingly and without the lawful authority to do so;
  • Enters the property of another after receiving notice from the owner or occupants forbidding entry;
  • Remains on another person’s land after being told by the owner or occupant to depart;
  • Presents false documents or misrepresents his/her identity in order to falsely obtain permission to enter or remain on another person’s property;
  • Intentionally removes a posted notice from residential real estate early; or
  • Enters or remains in a field that could be used to grow crops, a fenced area or building that contains livestock, or an orchard in a motor vehicle after being told by the owner or occupant that doing so is forbidden.

Criminal trespass to real property is generally charged as a Class B misdemeanor in Illinois and is punishable by up to six months in jail and a fine of up to $500.

Criminal Trespass to a Residence: Code Section 720 ILCS 5/19-4

Additionally, the Illinois Compiled Statutes also contains a more specific statute that criminalizes trespass to a residence. Under section 720 ILCS 5/19-4 an individual commits criminal trespass to a residence when he/she (1) knowingly enters or remains in a residence without the authority to do so, or (2) knowingly enters or remains in someone else’s residence without the authority to do so while knowing (or having reason to know) that at least one person is home.

Criminal trespass to a residence can be charged as either a Class A misdemeanor or as a Class 4 felony.

Criminal Trespass to Vehicles: Code Section 720 ILCS 5/21-2

Under section 720 ILCS 5/21-2 of the Illinois Compiled Statutes an individual commits criminal trespass to vehicles when he/she knowingly enters a vehicle, watercraft, aircraft, or snowmobile without the authority to do so.

Criminal trespass to vehicles is a Class A misdemeanor in Illinois.

Contact Us for Help Today

If you have been accused of criminal trespass in Illinois contact the Law Offices of Christopher M. Cosley without delay. Our team of experienced Rolling Meadows criminal defense lawyers defend both adults and minors against criminal trespass charges as well as a wide array of other criminal allegations across Illinois.

Source:

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/fulltext.asp?DocName=072000050K21-3

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Written by Staff Writer

August 14th, 2017 at 7:00 am

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